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Author Topic: durian seedlings  (Read 1238 times)

noochka1

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Re: durian seedlings
« Reply #25 on: December 12, 2019, 04:24:23 PM »
Mike T, are you using a fungicide?  My plants often succumb this time of year to what appears to be leaf anthracnose.  I've tried Bayer Advanced and copper but it doesn't seem to make much difference.  New leaves are still infected, and young shoots still die off.  If it wasn't for the anthracnose, I think the plants would actually be OK.

Mike T

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Re: durian seedlings
« Reply #26 on: December 12, 2019, 05:56:15 PM »
http://dev.territorystories.nt.gov.au/jspui/bitstream/10070/230332/1/Durian.pdf
Oscar I assume with such small fruit with scant flesh there is every chance it is no prize. Lim/Kostermans Table 5 in the attachment did not list it as one of the 9 edible species and Lim is perhaps the world authority on Durio. This was based on Kostermans observations. I have not tried it myself.
I don't use fungicide on my durians and have no problems with disease just insects.

Finca La Isla

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Re: durian seedlings
« Reply #27 on: December 12, 2019, 10:00:01 PM »
Interesting observation.  With Jakfruit Iím convinced that seedlings can fruit even faster than grafted trees.  But with durian the grafted trees can develop rapidly.  They might fruit quickest without pruning but it seems worthwhile to shape the grafted trees, create an efficient scaffold for fruit production
In very traditional farms like in Balik Pulau on Penang pruning to shape is unusual while planting of grafted trees is pretty much what everyone is doing.  Everyone agrees that grafted trees produce quicker but more important is the fruit quality that comes from the clone selections.
Peter

Mike T

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Re: durian seedlings
« Reply #28 on: December 12, 2019, 10:34:46 PM »















Mike T

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Re: durian seedlings
« Reply #29 on: December 12, 2019, 10:45:46 PM »
I just went out in the midday sun to take some pics.
Jackfruit seedlings can fruit quickly in some varieties. The leaning J33 seedling below fruited at 2 years old but so did the grafted amber in the second pic.
The durians posted below are:
Marcotted limberlost -fruited at 4 years
grafted penang 88- fruited at 6 years
grafted Red Prawn - fruited at 7 years
grafted gumpun- fruited at 5 years
grafted luang -fruited at 6 years.
These are a little quicker than usual to produce fruit.I have seen many seedlings at 10 to 12 years old that have not yet flowered and I wouldn't be surprised if the average for first flowering is over 10 yo.

noochka1

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Re: durian seedlings
« Reply #30 on: December 13, 2019, 05:49:07 AM »
Shot,

you're just "up the street" from me.  Are you experiencing any issues with leaf anthracnose?  If so, what are you using?

Finca La Isla

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Re: durian seedlings
« Reply #31 on: December 13, 2019, 11:35:25 AM »
Nice work,Mike.
On Penang they always insist that the trees have to be old to produce good quality durian.  Iím wondering what you think about that and how the Penang varieties that you guys are growing in Oz differ from the durians produced in Malaysia.
Thanks, Peter

fruitlovers

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Re: durian seedlings
« Reply #32 on: December 13, 2019, 10:11:25 PM »
http://dev.territorystories.nt.gov.au/jspui/bitstream/10070/230332/1/Durian.pdf
Oscar I assume with such small fruit with scant flesh there is every chance it is no prize. Lim/Kostermans Table 5 in the attachment did not list it as one of the 9 edible species and Lim is perhaps the world authority on Durio. This was based on Kostermans observations. I have not tried it myself.
I don't use fungicide on my durians and have no problems with disease just insects.

Mike, it's definitely very edible and it's definitely a prize, especially given its cold hardiness. This is based on a group of friends that went to Mt. Kinabaluensis and ate a whole bunch of them. Micah is one of those people and is on this forum, so i'll try to get him to post about his first hand experience with Durio kinabaluensis.
Oscar

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Re: durian seedlings
« Reply #33 on: December 14, 2019, 01:13:47 AM »
I don't use fungicide on my durians and have no problems with disease just insects.

That's good to know.  What's your annual rainfall, and is it supplemented by irrigation for your durian trees?

Here's a write up from Year of The Durian that is favorable for Durio "K".   https://www.yearofthedurian.com/2014/10/mount-kinabalu-and-its-durian-durio.html

micah

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Re: durian seedlings
« Reply #34 on: December 14, 2019, 01:20:41 AM »
Aloha fruit friends and fiends! :)
Went on an amazing durio tour in Borneo with Lindsay Gasik aka durianwriter.  I highly recommend taking a trip with her.   We gots to try many types of species and with each there was lots of variation.
Durio Kinabaluensis was a small fruit with kinda scant pulp...sort of like Durio graveolens ....but the flavor was delicious.  I preferred them more than the different graveolens, kura kura, the small oxylanus, and dulcis. They were sweet, and exquisite.
Worthy to grow for sure, but one fruit wonít get one person full.  Nothing like the copious amount of flesh a Durio zib has.  Hard to beat zibithinus in flavor too.  Some of the lowianus was close second favorite, then large oxylanus, then Kinabalu for flavor.
Heres a couple pics of Kinabaluensis











Mike T

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Re: durian seedlings
« Reply #35 on: December 14, 2019, 01:38:24 AM »
Fair enough Micah it looks as though my assumption was wrong.It may be a contender to try and cross with a more cold hardy D,zib variety and try and get the best of all worlds.

fruitlovers

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Re: durian seedlings
« Reply #36 on: December 14, 2019, 05:59:39 AM »
Fair enough Micah it looks as though my assumption was wrong.It may be a contender to try and cross with a more cold hardy D,zib variety and try and get the best of all worlds.
Mike, it seems to me that you jump to too many conclusions based on old Australian publications. This species is worthwhile on its own, and also as possible candidate as rootstock to possibly increase hardiness. Ofcourse hybridizing is also another possible angle. I would be surprised if it's not already been done somewhere in Borneo.
Oscar

fruitlovers

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Re: durian seedlings
« Reply #37 on: December 14, 2019, 06:18:01 AM »
Here are some taste reports of another fellow that was on same trip with Lindsey and Micah to Mount Kinabaluensis.
Here is what he said on the spot during texting me while eating Durio kinabaluensis.
"Oh man, it is so delicious! It was my favorite of all of them so far. Didn't even really taste like durian. No funk or fuel. Tasted like the most delicious floral candy imaginable.
Later towards the end of the same trip i asked him what his favorites were of the non zybethinus durio species he tried.
"Favorites were kinabaluensis and graveolens. Kutejensis are not so unique... Kura kura (testudinarum) and dulcis...  bizarre, wouldn't want to eat too often...
Oxyleanus I liked a lot but they're intense... fuely"
Oscar

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Re: durian seedlings
« Reply #38 on: December 14, 2019, 11:40:34 AM »
"Fuely" Does that mean rich, caloric?

Thank you, Micah for sharing your impressions.  What a great experience, sampling several unusual durio species straight from the source.

Finca La Isla

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Re: durian seedlings
« Reply #39 on: December 14, 2019, 01:28:49 PM »
Thereís a lot of variation and it is so subjective.  We had oxyleanus on the peninsula and then on the Bay of Brunei, very different.  The Borneo oxyleanus was one of our best experiences.  The kutejensis from the agro park of Tenom was phenomenal. We ate a lot of graveleons and there is a lot of variety there too.
The point is that none of these should be dismissed on the basis of one persons experience or limited sampling.
Peter

fruitlovers

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Re: durian seedlings
« Reply #40 on: December 14, 2019, 04:21:02 PM »
Thereís a lot of variation and it is so subjective.  We had oxyleanus on the peninsula and then on the Bay of Brunei, very different.  The Borneo oxyleanus was one of our best experiences.  The kutejensis from the agro park of Tenom was phenomenal. We ate a lot of graveleons and there is a lot of variety there too.
The point is that none of these should be dismissed on the basis of one persons experience or limited sampling.
Peter
Agreed, lots of diversity inside each durio species. That's why it's best to plant a lot more than one, if you have the room. I have fruiting oxleyanus and mine are quite good in my opinion. But it's different when you can taste them all in one big fell swoop side by side.
Oscar

fruitlovers

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Re: durian seedlings
« Reply #41 on: December 14, 2019, 10:49:26 PM »
"Fuely" Does that mean rich, caloric?

Thank you, Micah for sharing your impressions.  What a great experience, sampling several unusual durio species straight from the source.
No, he didn't mean rich or caloric. I just asked him and his reply:
"Not quite solvent and not quite kerosene but just something Feuly"
I think he means a bit of a turpentine taste.
Oscar

micah

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Re: durian seedlings
« Reply #42 on: December 14, 2019, 11:51:12 PM »
It was quite a durio extravaganza.  Awesome to do a trip with a bunch of peeps, that way we could sample so many types in a sitting without wasting or going broke.
Yes ,there was so much diversity in each species. Just when I thought red graveolens wasnít that good ,we tried some that were savory ...more like avocado...and good

I think he meant durio dulcis when he said FUELY.   Alll one can do when describing a flavor is say ďlikeĒ something else...but once u try dulcis...then itís hard to forget.  Itís got a menthol like taste strong Vickís menthol/paint thinner smell. Sweet and good, but very pungent powerful.   Too powerful of a smell to be kept in a hot van for too long...even for durio lovers.
Maybe some of graveolens had similar flavor/smell
Dulcis Pics


 
"Fuely" Does that mean rich, caloric?

Thank you, Micah for sharing your impressions.  What a great experience, sampling several unusual durio species straight from the source.
No, he didn't mean rich or caloric. I just asked him and his reply:
"Not quite solvent and not quite kerosene but just something Feuly"
I think he means a bit of a turpentine taste.




brian

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Re: durian seedlings
« Reply #43 on: February 14, 2020, 08:06:40 AM »
over two months later, the first durian seedling pulled its way out of the seed coat and put out leaves.   They were growing so slowly I thought they were dead.


SeaWalnut

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Re: durian seedlings
« Reply #44 on: February 14, 2020, 06:40:57 PM »
over two months later, the first durian seedling pulled its way out of the seed coat and put out leaves.   They were growing so slowly I thought they were dead.


Pit them in a bigger pot with acid soil ( maybe see my thread about iron pan soil) and keep them wet and fertilise it strong.
Use rain water or not verry alkaline water.

 

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