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Author Topic: Peach leaf curl  (Read 391 times)

spaugh

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Peach leaf curl
« on: December 11, 2019, 11:49:33 AM »
Is copper the only thing that controls it or is there something less toxic to use?
Brad Spaugh

K-Rimes

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Re: Peach leaf curl
« Reply #1 on: December 11, 2019, 01:27:13 PM »
My plum and pluot suffered this all year, so I am interested in this too.

forumfool

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Re: Peach leaf curl
« Reply #2 on: December 11, 2019, 04:39:18 PM »
Have you tried just leaving it alone? When I was in San Jose all my peaches got curl but the trees were so vigorous they would just drop those leaves and grow more right away. Fruit was always excellent just a cosmetic issue to me.

Anolis

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Re: Peach leaf curl
« Reply #3 on: December 13, 2019, 12:51:23 PM »
It would probably be easier to just plant/graft resistant varieties. One green world sells some trees that are known to be resistant to peach leaf curl.

spaugh

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Re: Peach leaf curl
« Reply #4 on: December 13, 2019, 04:40:30 PM »
Have you tried just leaving it alone? When I was in San Jose all my peaches got curl but the trees were so vigorous they would just drop those leaves and grow more right away. Fruit was always excellent just a cosmetic issue to me.

I have been leaving it alone but last winter was very wet and the trees suffered badly.  Normally they can grow out of it quickly and shed it off by mid summer but it never fully recovered last year.  I would like to go ahead and kill it off this winter and then maybe leave it alone again for a few years and see if its better. 

As far as switching varieties, not going to happen.  I have all the good tasting low chill ones that can fruit here.
« Last Edit: December 13, 2019, 04:46:39 PM by spaugh »
Brad Spaugh

usirius

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Re: Peach leaf curl
« Reply #5 on: December 15, 2019, 02:53:22 PM »
qspaugh: There is also a biological control method: Spraying the trunk, all branches and all twigs and buds from all sides with 10% acetic acid. This should happen during the rest period, i.e. from now until mid-January at the latest on a day when it is between 5°C and 10°C and does not rain. The background is that the fungus lives on the bark and infects the buds and the young shoots when the buds swell. Once the fungus is in the green parts of the plant, it is difficult to control it. The best time for very successful control is, as I said, the resting period, which also applies when chemical pesticides are used. For the use of acetic acid as a pesticide, the pump syringe must be suitable (the sealing rings must be made of silicone or EPDM).
„May your choices reflect your hopes, not your fears.“ N. Mandela

spaugh

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Re: Peach leaf curl
« Reply #6 on: December 15, 2019, 09:34:03 PM »
Thanks, it looks like venagar contains the acid you mentioned.  I will try using it on some trees and use copper on others.

Brad Spaugh

spaugh

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Re: Peach leaf curl
« Reply #7 on: December 15, 2019, 09:36:42 PM »
Brad Spaugh

usirius

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Re: Peach leaf curl
« Reply #8 on: December 17, 2019, 03:14:03 PM »
@Spaugh - Yes vinegar contains the acid I mentioned. The method you mentioned is somewhat different as I have mentioned and have been practicing for many years. In the method you found, they take besides (only!) 5% wine vinegar other substances that are also organic. In the method I mentioned, which I have been practicing for many years, acetic acid is used exclusively, but it is twice as concentrated as in commercial vinegar, namely 10%. In Europe one can buy acetic acid in 20% to 60% concentration quite inexpensively canister-wise.  Look, concentrated acetic acid is so easily available in your country. If yes, I would recommend my method to you. It has only one disadvantage: Anything that gets overspray other than the peach tree can be damaged, this can be weeds, lawns, evergreen plants of any kind. Deciduous woody shrubs usually have no problem with acetic acid. If you like, I can refer you in the next few weeks to a publication in German by the University of Hohenheim (Germany) on the treatment of peach ripple disease with acetic acid.
„May your choices reflect your hopes, not your fears.“ N. Mandela

 

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