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Author Topic: 2020 Mango Season (Florida)  (Read 7191 times)

strkpr00

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Re: 2020 Mango Season (Florida)
« Reply #100 on: February 03, 2020, 08:49:21 PM »
Ice cream is my biggest disappointment, maybe 1% fruit set at this time, loads of dead flowers.

mangokothiyan

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Re: 2020 Mango Season (Florida)
« Reply #101 on: February 04, 2020, 12:25:37 AM »
Bloom has been OK but spotty. Fruit set has been good. The bad news is that I'm already seeing MBBS, along with anthracnose. We had too much rain this winter. Could be a bad year, high disease pressure -- the opposite of last winter.

Curious to hear @Squam256's report on disease issues this season.

We need to find something that's effective against MBBS. I was going to try that Phyton 35, but the instructions require posting of signs if one is using it within 300 feet of a residential area and carries the Warning signal word. I might give copper oxide + agri mycin a shot.

There's a new product on the market called Revysol, which received EPA "Reduced Risk" status. Not labeled for mango, but would be interesting to try on MBBS.

I am seeing the same in my yard. Better than usual fruit set but have been seeing MBBS and anthracnose over the last week. Seeing it on Himasagar, Keitt, Bailey's Marvel, Kesar, Angie and even Edgar. Mallika, Cotton Candy, Florigon, NDM #4, Valcarrie and Lemon Meringue seem to have some resistance.


mangokothiyan

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Re: 2020 Mango Season (Florida)
« Reply #102 on: February 04, 2020, 12:27:11 AM »
My Carrie blooms failed woefully as well.

It was a heavy flowering, not sure if it was the rain and cold or just a lot of males.  Carries are reported to make a lot of male flowers sometimes.

Carrie has a reputation for flowering heavily the first time and then disappointing big time. It is the same thing every year; more male flowers than almost every other variety. This is the fourth year that has happened to me, and my friends have reported the same issue as well. It usually flowers again, not nearly as much as the first time, but the fruit set is usually better. Another variety that does the same thing is Ugly Betty; it is the first to flower in my yard and sometimes flowers three times during a season, but I end up getting less than 10 mangoes.

skhan

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Re: 2020 Mango Season (Florida)
« Reply #103 on: February 04, 2020, 08:40:09 AM »
Can you guys post some picks so I know what to look for?
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skhan

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Re: 2020 Mango Season (Florida)
« Reply #104 on: February 04, 2020, 08:55:35 AM »
I was looking at the weather history for my location and noticed 11/16/19-11/21/19 we had lows below 61F.
3 weeks after I started seeing my first blooms.

From 1/20/20 -1/27/20 we had similar lows so I'm hoping to see the rest of the trees bloom around the 17th.

We have a similar post each year so maybe someone can dig those up and compare historical weather data.

I know the bloom triggers are well documented, but I'm always guessing as to when the flowers will emerge after.
Hopefully, i can spray before now.


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Squam256

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Re: 2020 Mango Season (Florida)
« Reply #105 on: February 04, 2020, 10:56:45 AM »
We did “ok” on the first bloom all things considered. Edward trees had a full bloom, along with most “bloom sensitive stuff”, with plenty of trees with partial/incomplete blooms and too many with zero, to be expected with such weak winters. Spotty is a good description for most of south Florida. Larger, older trees saw majority blooms but most younger mangos saw incomplete blooms or no blooms at all depending on variety and tree condition.

The rain in December was so heavy and frequent that we were unable to protect the earliest opening blooms from fungal damage and so the early crops on Rosigold and Jean Ellen will be reduced compared to last year.

Male flower ratio is a huge problem with a number of varieties and will be a major reason why the early crop will be a bust for many in south Florida. The flowers that opened first on Edwards, Carrie, Julie, Dwarf Hawaiian and some others were almost exclusively male. Flowers that opened a week or so later had better female flower ratio and consequently set well. I’ll try to remember to take some pics later.

MBBS incidence is indeed likely to be increased over 2019. That it is showing up on small fruit already is a strong indicator, as these lesions will stay on the fruit, expand and spread rapidly to other fruit once rainy season begins again. The amount of spraying and sanitation removal to attempt to limit it exceeds what most backyard growers are willing to commit.

If the season was going to be based solely on what is on the trees now, then we would be looking at the worst south Florida mango crop in at least a decade. Fortunately, we are very likely to see a secondary bloom occur in the later part of this month. Already we are seeing some new bloom activity on Carries, Dots, Okrung, Rosas and others stemming from minor cool weather in the first half of January. We have had 15C and below nights on 11 of the last 16 days, which is what will trigger the larger bloom we’ll be seeing in a few weeks. The question will be how extensive it’s going to actually be given all the late vegetative flushes that occurred at the end of 2019 because of the ridiculously hot October we had. With the lows climbing up into the upper 60s/low 70sF the next few weeks, I wouldn’t be surprised to see a good amount of mixed panicles, morphing to vegetative growth in stuff that Takes too long to initiate following the relative cool of the end of January. Will also be interested to see how much “re-bloom” we see , vs new bloom on stems that did not flower in January.

A great crop is pretty much out of the question. But we could still have an “acceptable” crop (or at least what has become acceptable over the last 10 years in south Florida).

edzone9

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Re: 2020 Mango Season (Florida)
« Reply #106 on: February 04, 2020, 01:41:26 PM »
My Pickering lots of blooms , my M4 half the tree is in bloom.

I had more blooms last year, but I’m great-full for any fruit I get this season .

Ed

Ps I’m totally hooked on growing medicinal mushrooms!
Lots of fun! 
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Cookie Monster

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Re: 2020 Mango Season (Florida)
« Reply #107 on: February 04, 2020, 03:45:23 PM »
Thanks for the update. Sounds similar to what I'm seeing here. Low bloom plus bad MBBS outbreak could mean a bad harvest. And, yah, seeing very little in the way of 2nd bloom starting, even though we've had a good deal of cold over the past several weeks.

We did “ok” on the first bloom all things considered. Edward trees had a full bloom, along with most “bloom sensitive stuff”, with plenty of trees with partial/incomplete blooms and too many with zero, to be expected with such weak winters. Spotty is a good description for most of south Florida. Larger, older trees saw majority blooms but most younger mangos saw incomplete blooms or no blooms at all depending on variety and tree condition.

The rain in December was so heavy and frequent that we were unable to protect the earliest opening blooms from fungal damage and so the early crops on Rosigold and Jean Ellen will be reduced compared to last year.

Male flower ratio is a huge problem with a number of varieties and will be a major reason why the early crop will be a bust for many in south Florida. The flowers that opened first on Edwards, Carrie, Julie, Dwarf Hawaiian and some others were almost exclusively male. Flowers that opened a week or so later had better female flower ratio and consequently set well. I’ll try to remember to take some pics later.

MBBS incidence is indeed likely to be increased over 2019. That it is showing up on small fruit already is a strong indicator, as these lesions will stay on the fruit, expand and spread rapidly to other fruit once rainy season begins again. The amount of spraying and sanitation removal to attempt to limit it exceeds what most backyard growers are willing to commit.

If the season was going to be based solely on what is on the trees now, then we would be looking at the worst south Florida mango crop in at least a decade. Fortunately, we are very likely to see a secondary bloom occur in the later part of this month. Already we are seeing some new bloom activity on Carries, Dots, Okrung, Rosas and others stemming from minor cool weather in the first half of January. We have had 15C and below nights on 11 of the last 16 days, which is what will trigger the larger bloom we’ll be seeing in a few weeks. The question will be how extensive it’s going to actually be given all the late vegetative flushes that occurred at the end of 2019 because of the ridiculously hot October we had. With the lows climbing up into the upper 60s/low 70sF the next few weeks, I wouldn’t be surprised to see a good amount of mixed panicles, morphing to vegetative growth in stuff that Takes too long to initiate following the relative cool of the end of January. Will also be interested to see how much “re-bloom” we see , vs new bloom on stems that did not flower in January.

A great crop is pretty much out of the question. But we could still have an “acceptable” crop (or at least what has become acceptable over the last 10 years in south Florida).
Jeff  :-)

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Re: 2020 Mango Season (Florida)
« Reply #108 on: February 04, 2020, 09:40:04 PM »
Thus far, things are looking pretty good down this way. Nice fruit set on Glenn, better than last year. Increases on ndm4, coco cream, and first fruits on Kesar, kasturi and sweet tart. OS dropped all fruits. Hoping for a second bloom.

Will take a close look tomorrow for any problems/disease, but haven't noticed anything out of the ordinary.


savemejebus

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Re: 2020 Mango Season (Florida)
« Reply #109 on: February 05, 2020, 08:16:32 AM »
Fairly awful year for my yard. Last year we had a great bloom and that might explain the disappointing bloom this year. My Glenn which for 9 years straight has consistently been wonderful this year has maybe 1 flower on it. Of 15 trees, maybe 2 have a semi-decent bloom.

Tropheus76

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Re: 2020 Mango Season (Florida)
« Reply #110 on: February 05, 2020, 08:58:22 AM »
Its still early for blooms in my opinion since Feb is traditionally our coldest month. But I have them on several of my trees. Like I said elsewhere, early blooms and the warm winter is bringing out the weevils who love mango and some citrus trees. Spray your trees after the blooms finish to try and put a check on the voracious little bastards. Provided you don't have chickens happy to fly up into your tree to eat them.

Cookie Monster

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Re: 2020 Mango Season (Florida)
« Reply #111 on: February 13, 2020, 09:58:20 PM »
Lots of bloom happening here. Looks like it might be a good year after all. Just need to keep an eye on the MBBS.
Jeff  :-)

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Re: 2020 Mango Season (Florida)
« Reply #112 on: February 13, 2020, 10:44:21 PM »
some kesars and ndm fruit appear to have anthracnose, a few have dropped. cc, st, glenn, and kasturi fruits all look good.

better fruit set on glenn than last year, and new flowers are popping.

EddieF

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Re: 2020 Mango Season (Florida)
« Reply #113 on: February 14, 2020, 08:34:15 AM »
Here in psl, my few flowers that became bb size mangos disappeared.
90% of the rest of the tree is paused at bud stage for over a month.
Anthracnose back with vengence, cloudy today so a dose of copper's on my to-do list.
When i plant a few trees next month, i'll want varieties tolerant to warmer & humid weather if this is new norm.

brian

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Re: 2020 Mango Season (Florida)
« Reply #114 on: February 14, 2020, 11:15:59 AM »
2020 Mango Season (Pennsylvania)   :P

mangokothiyan

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Re: 2020 Mango Season (Florida)
« Reply #115 on: February 14, 2020, 12:37:41 PM »
some kesars and ndm fruit appear to have anthracnose, a few have dropped. cc, st, glenn, and kasturi fruits all look good.

better fruit set on glenn than last year, and new flowers are popping.

Same here.. first time I am seeing these varieties being hit by anthracnose. I see open skin and bleeding on some fruits as well.

On the brighter side, most of the trees are blooming for the second time.

Cookie Monster

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Re: 2020 Mango Season (Florida)
« Reply #116 on: February 14, 2020, 05:41:11 PM »
Might need to step up your spray regimen. This time of year, you really need to spray at least once every 2 weeks. And it helps to apply curative products (eg, the strobilurins) as well as preventative (copper).

some kesars and ndm fruit appear to have anthracnose, a few have dropped. cc, st, glenn, and kasturi fruits all look good.

better fruit set on glenn than last year, and new flowers are popping.

Same here.. first time I am seeing these varieties being hit by anthracnose. I see open skin and bleeding on some fruits as well.

On the brighter side, most of the trees are blooming for the second time.
Jeff  :-)

Squam256

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Re: 2020 Mango Season (Florida)
« Reply #117 on: February 14, 2020, 07:02:23 PM »
We’re getting more and more aggressive strains of anthracnose in south Florida.

MangoCountry

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Re: 2020 Mango Season (Florida)
« Reply #118 on: February 17, 2020, 01:08:48 PM »
Blooms emerging now on M-4, Fruit Punch, Guava and Lemon Zest. Peach Cobbler, Sweet Tart, and Buttercream aren’t far behind. Venus and Sugarloaf don’t look very promising. Hoping for the best







« Last Edit: February 17, 2020, 01:18:15 PM by MangoCountry »

edzone9

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Re: 2020 Mango Season (Florida)
« Reply #119 on: February 17, 2020, 01:45:55 PM »
I jumped the gun guys !

M4- Heavy Blooms
Maha - Heavy Blooms
Pickering- Heavy Blooms
Cotton Candy - Heavy Blooms
Mauritius lychee- Heavy Bloom
Guava Mango - Heavy Blooms
Pin-apple Pleasure ( Recently Planted )
Holiday Avocado - Super Heavy Blooms

Ed


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skhan

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Re: 2020 Mango Season (Florida)
« Reply #120 on: February 18, 2020, 10:23:12 AM »
I'm seeing a finally seeing the second bloom panicles emerging.
A lot of buds haven't even begun to push, so at least for me it might not be a complete bloom (this current summer-like weather might not help)
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skhan

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Re: 2020 Mango Season (Florida)
« Reply #121 on: February 18, 2020, 10:38:37 AM »
@Alex

LMK if you need help compiling a list of bloom sensitive stuff.
I can make a google spreadsheet with mango cultivars with the goal of people filtering things down based on different attributes like MBBS resistance, bloom sensitivity etc.
Don't think there's a convenient resource for this yet.

A lot of people's biggest resource when starting out is PINs viewer and Fairchilds list. (That's what i planted, then began to top work years later)
They're gonna have to decide whether to "top-rated" varieties like "Tebow" or Cogshall   :P
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palmcity

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Re: 2020 Mango Season (Florida)
« Reply #122 on: February 18, 2020, 10:48:41 AM »
We did “ok” on the first bloom all things considered. Edward trees had a full bloom, along with most “bloom sensitive stuff”, with plenty of trees with partial/incomplete blooms and too many with zero, to be expected with such weak winters. Spotty is a good description for most of south Florida. Larger, older trees saw majority blooms but most younger mangos saw incomplete blooms or no blooms at all depending on variety and tree condition.

The rain in December was so heavy and frequent that we were unable to protect the earliest opening blooms from fungal damage and so the early crops on Rosigold and Jean Ellen will be reduced compared to last year.

Male flower ratio is a huge problem with a number of varieties and will be a major reason why the early crop will be a bust for many in south Florida. The flowers that opened first on Edwards, Carrie, Julie, Dwarf Hawaiian and some others were almost exclusively male. Flowers that opened a week or so later had better female flower ratio and consequently set well. I’ll try to remember to take some pics later.

MBBS incidence is indeed likely to be increased over 2019. That it is showing up on small fruit already is a strong indicator, as these lesions will stay on the fruit, expand and spread rapidly to other fruit once rainy season begins again. The amount of spraying and sanitation removal to attempt to limit it exceeds what most backyard growers are willing to commit.

If the season was going to be based solely on what is on the trees now, then we would be looking at the worst south Florida mango crop in at least a decade. Fortunately, we are very likely to see a secondary bloom occur in the later part of this month. Already we are seeing some new bloom activity on Carries, Dots, Okrung, Rosas and others stemming from minor cool weather in the first half of January. We have had 15C and below nights on 11 of the last 16 days, which is what will trigger the larger bloom we’ll be seeing in a few weeks. The question will be how extensive it’s going to actually be given all the late vegetative flushes that occurred at the end of 2019 because of the ridiculously hot October we had. With the lows climbing up into the upper 60s/low 70sF the next few weeks, I wouldn’t be surprised to see a good amount of mixed panicles, morphing to vegetative growth in stuff that Takes too long to initiate following the relative cool of the end of January. Will also be interested to see how much “re-bloom” we see , vs new bloom on stems that did not flower in January.

A great crop is pretty much out of the question. But we could still have an “acceptable” crop (or at least what has become acceptable over the last 10 years in south Florida).

Any Pics Yet.............
"Male flower ratio is a huge problem with a number of varieties......... vs. female flower ratio.......................... I’ll try to remember to take some pics later. "


Squam256

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Re: 2020 Mango Season (Florida)
« Reply #123 on: February 18, 2020, 11:31:45 AM »
We did “ok” on the first bloom all things considered. Edward trees had a full bloom, along with most “bloom sensitive stuff”, with plenty of trees with partial/incomplete blooms and too many with zero, to be expected with such weak winters. Spotty is a good description for most of south Florida. Larger, older trees saw majority blooms but most younger mangos saw incomplete blooms or no blooms at all depending on variety and tree condition.

The rain in December was so heavy and frequent that we were unable to protect the earliest opening blooms from fungal damage and so the early crops on Rosigold and Jean Ellen will be reduced compared to last year.

Male flower ratio is a huge problem with a number of varieties and will be a major reason why the early crop will be a bust for many in south Florida. The flowers that opened first on Edwards, Carrie, Julie, Dwarf Hawaiian and some others were almost exclusively male. Flowers that opened a week or so later had better female flower ratio and consequently set well. I’ll try to remember to take some pics later.

MBBS incidence is indeed likely to be increased over 2019. That it is showing up on small fruit already is a strong indicator, as these lesions will stay on the fruit, expand and spread rapidly to other fruit once rainy season begins again. The amount of spraying and sanitation removal to attempt to limit it exceeds what most backyard growers are willing to commit.

If the season was going to be based solely on what is on the trees now, then we would be looking at the worst south Florida mango crop in at least a decade. Fortunately, we are very likely to see a secondary bloom occur in the later part of this month. Already we are seeing some new bloom activity on Carries, Dots, Okrung, Rosas and others stemming from minor cool weather in the first half of January. We have had 15C and below nights on 11 of the last 16 days, which is what will trigger the larger bloom we’ll be seeing in a few weeks. The question will be how extensive it’s going to actually be given all the late vegetative flushes that occurred at the end of 2019 because of the ridiculously hot October we had. With the lows climbing up into the upper 60s/low 70sF the next few weeks, I wouldn’t be surprised to see a good amount of mixed panicles, morphing to vegetative growth in stuff that Takes too long to initiate following the relative cool of the end of January. Will also be interested to see how much “re-bloom” we see , vs new bloom on stems that did not flower in January.

A great crop is pretty much out of the question. But we could still have an “acceptable” crop (or at least what has become acceptable over the last 10 years in south Florida).

Any Pics Yet.............
"Male flower ratio is a huge problem with a number of varieties......... vs. female flower ratio.......................... I’ll try to remember to take some pics later. "

No, but we shot some video where I talk about it comparing varieties . Needs to get edited and uploaded.

Das Bhut

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Re: 2020 Mango Season (Florida)
« Reply #124 on: February 19, 2020, 05:46:44 AM »
My sugar loaf is pretty small but has a few blooms on it, no diseases.

orange essence which is 4 years old has no blooms just a moderate amount of bacterial leaf spots.

honey kiss shouldn't have blooms yet, but the tree looks great and this will be it's second year fruiting so I'm not worried.

 

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