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Author Topic: 2020 Mango Season (Florida)  (Read 10407 times)

Jani

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Re: 2020 Mango Season (Florida)
« Reply #150 on: February 25, 2020, 09:14:58 AM »
Looks like next Thursday to Sunday we may get 4 pretty chilly nights esp for late feb/early March ...upper 40s. What are the chances of 3rd bloom a few weeks after the cool stretch?

I'm also on second bloom for my trees like many here, and for one well established NDM tree in particular, I hoping for a 3rd as the first two blooms only covered about a 3rd of the tree.

Decent possibility there will be some bloom response on stems that werenít aged enough for the first two waves. The more nights under 60F, the more greater the response.

Weíre seeing plenty of what youíre describing as well: partial blooms rather than full on some varieties. Weíre even seeing vegetative growth on a number of things that took too long to initiate.

Alex what is the reason for partial blooms ? My Maha is doing that .
Thanks Ed

Inadequate cold stimulus from our failing winters.

Gonna be interesting to see what will come from  this upcoming late season genuine cold spell
always longing for a JA Julie

mangokothiyan

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Re: 2020 Mango Season (Florida)
« Reply #151 on: February 25, 2020, 10:43:23 PM »



I will be spraying sulfur on all my trees tomorrow. Cold weather is ideal for powdery mildew and sulfur keeps that in check. 

Jani

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Re: 2020 Mango Season (Florida)
« Reply #152 on: February 29, 2020, 10:07:24 AM »
Seeing a lot of new blooms driving around s. FL
always longing for a JA Julie

saltyreefer

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Re: 2020 Mango Season (Florida)
« Reply #153 on: February 29, 2020, 07:03:31 PM »
2nd bloom in full force

Oncorhynchus

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Re: 2020 Mango Season (Florida)
« Reply #154 on: March 23, 2020, 11:04:47 PM »
I picked the last of my early season Rosigolds yesterday and should have a second small crop in a couple months.  This is the first year Iíve let it hold fruit and the fruit has ranged from mediocre to pretty good and surprisingly sweet. It reminds me of the little yellow champagne mangos you get at the grocery store but much prettier!  So far Iíve been really happy with this tree and since I know the first couple crops can be subpar, Iím really excited to see what this tree can do!  Is anyone else picking mangoes or have some ready to pick in the near future?

Squam256

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Re: 2020 Mango Season (Florida)
« Reply #155 on: March 23, 2020, 11:08:42 PM »
I picked the last of my early season Rosigolds yesterday and should have a second small crop in a couple months.  This is the first year Iíve let it hold fruit and the fruit has ranged from mediocre to pretty good and surprisingly sweet. It reminds me of the little yellow champagne mangos you get at the grocery store but much prettier!  So far Iíve been really happy with this tree and since I know the first couple crops can be subpar, Iím really excited to see what this tree can do!  Is anyone else picking mangoes or have some ready to pick in the near future?

Found a couple ripe Edward fruit today:




Wesley

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Re: 2020 Mango Season (Florida)
« Reply #156 on: March 24, 2020, 04:36:42 AM »
I don't like mango very much, but I like dried mango. It's very delicious!
Great hope makes great man.

johnb51

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Re: 2020 Mango Season (Florida)
« Reply #157 on: March 24, 2020, 08:41:44 AM »
I don't like mango very much, but I like dried mango. It's very delicious!
Dude, I think this forum is the wrong place for you!
John

roblack

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Re: 2020 Mango Season (Florida)
« Reply #158 on: March 24, 2020, 09:14:36 AM »
I picked the last of my early season Rosigolds yesterday and should have a second small crop in a couple months.  This is the first year Iíve let it hold fruit and the fruit has ranged from mediocre to pretty good and surprisingly sweet. It reminds me of the little yellow champagne mangos you get at the grocery store but much prettier!  So far Iíve been really happy with this tree and since I know the first couple crops can be subpar, Iím really excited to see what this tree can do!  Is anyone else picking mangoes or have some ready to pick in the near future?

Found a couple ripe Edward fruit today:

wonder what these would go for on auction right now? lol! have been waiting over 6 months for decent mangoes...




shot

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Re: 2020 Mango Season (Florida)
« Reply #159 on: March 24, 2020, 09:31:05 AM »
Picked ripe beverly ,late is early?1.6 lbs

skhan

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Re: 2020 Mango Season (Florida)
« Reply #160 on: March 24, 2020, 09:40:43 AM »
Crazy year, you guys are picking mangos while I'm getting a partial 3rd bloom on my some of my trees
Khan's Edible Oasis
Yard as of Jan 2019

Squam256

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Re: 2020 Mango Season (Florida)
« Reply #161 on: March 24, 2020, 09:58:40 AM »
Crazy year, you guys are picking mangos while I'm getting a partial 3rd bloom on my some of my trees

Seeing this too, on White Piri, Sugarloaf, O-15, M-4, Dwarf Hawaiian, Dot And several others. Wouldnít call it huge but itís certainly better than nothing.

skhan

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Re: 2020 Mango Season (Florida)
« Reply #162 on: March 24, 2020, 10:09:48 AM »
Crazy year, you guys are picking mangos while I'm getting a partial 3rd bloom on my some of my trees

Seeing this too, on White Piri, Sugarloaf, O-15, M-4, Dwarf Hawaiian, Dot And several others. Wouldnít call it huge but itís certainly better than nothing.

The second bloom was great but I'm hardly getting any fruit set off it.

Makes spraying hard when you have some fruitlets and new flowers on the same tree

I wonder if rapid changes in temp changes affect the male/female ratio
Khan's Edible Oasis
Yard as of Jan 2019

shot

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Re: 2020 Mango Season (Florida)
« Reply #163 on: March 24, 2020, 10:11:22 AM »
Has not been a great bloom overall , yes second bloom but not great.White piri not very good year.

Squam256

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Re: 2020 Mango Season (Florida)
« Reply #164 on: March 24, 2020, 12:26:55 PM »
Has not been a great bloom overall , yes second bloom but not great.White piri not very good year.

Thatís unfortunate. Hereís our White Piri set on second bloom:






palmcity

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Re: 2020 Mango Season (Florida)
« Reply #165 on: March 24, 2020, 04:28:01 PM »
Seeing this too, on  O-15,

I could not find a description of O-15 taste. What mango does it taste like or between what two mango variety tastes ?

Oolie

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Re: 2020 Mango Season (Florida)
« Reply #166 on: March 24, 2020, 08:02:06 PM »
Seeing this too, on  O-15,

I could not find a description of O-15 taste. What mango does it taste like or between what two mango variety tastes ?
https://www.tropicalacresfarms.com/product-page/zill-o-15

FMfruitforest

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Re: 2020 Mango Season (Florida)
« Reply #167 on: March 25, 2020, 06:07:16 AM »
It seems watering during flowering and fruitset is key for a great crop.

Frog Valley Farm

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Re: 2020 Mango Season (Florida)
« Reply #168 on: March 25, 2020, 07:03:54 AM »
It seems watering during flowering and fruitset is key for a great crop.
For us organic matter and our soils health is key to a great crop as we do not water.  A whole lot of fruit set from first bloom, lots of fruitlets set from 2nd bloom and 3rd bloom starting now on some trees. 

Pickering
« Last Edit: March 25, 2020, 07:57:22 AM by Frog Valley Farm »

johnb51

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Re: 2020 Mango Season (Florida)
« Reply #169 on: March 25, 2020, 09:05:37 AM »
It seems watering during flowering and fruitset is key for a great crop.
For us organic matter and our soils health is key to a great crop as we do not water.  A whole lot of fruit set from first bloom, lots of fruitlets set from 2nd bloom and 3rd bloom starting now on some trees. 

Pickering
Nice little Pickering.  How tall and how old?
John

FMfruitforest

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Re: 2020 Mango Season (Florida)
« Reply #170 on: March 25, 2020, 04:40:45 PM »

For us organic matter and our soils health is key to a great crop as we do not water.  A whole lot of fruit set from first bloom, lots of fruitlets set from 2nd bloom and 3rd bloom starting now on some trees. 

Pickering
[/quote]

I think you have the right approach to build the soil, and i agree with allowing the grass long too but I think for those who have bare ground or short cut grass  around their mangoes here in Florida would see benefits in  additional watering during flowering and fruitset.

Frog Valley Farm

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Re: 2020 Mango Season (Florida)
« Reply #171 on: March 26, 2020, 05:42:45 AM »
Iím all for watering as needed but with Mangos at our place it is not needed.  Grafted Black Sapote and grafted Sapodilla are a different story unless the soil is perfect, which on a larger scale takes time.  Seed grown trees of BS and Sapodilla donít require watering, for this reason we are growing replacements for BS and Sapodillas out now.  We plan on not selling our Mango fruit for the next  2 years and we are planting out all our Mango fruit seeds.  A major difference between organic and those using chemical fertilizers is you have to water if you use chemicals, whereas if you are organic watering isnít always required especially for Mangos here.  Grafted trees just donít have the vigor of seed grown trees.

The Pickering is a 5x5 mound in ground two years never been watered.
« Last Edit: March 26, 2020, 06:10:05 AM by Frog Valley Farm »

Cookie Monster

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Re: 2020 Mango Season (Florida)
« Reply #172 on: March 26, 2020, 11:30:16 AM »
Watering is always required if one wants the trees to uptake nutrients (it's the action of the water evaporating through the leaves that pulls nutrients up). In times of drought, water is going to be absorbed from deeper portions of the soil, which is typically less nutrient dense. Also, conventional fertilizers come in slow release form, which would act similarly to organic.

Water isn't required for mangoes (here in FL) if one is only interested in keeping the trees alive. For bountiful crops of quality fruit, moist soil is important. In places where rainfall isn't as plentiful as FL, only the most drought tolerant species will survive without supplemental irrigation (eg, eucalyptus).

In life, optimal outcome is generally achieved via finding a "sweet spot" or middle ground between two extremes. A mix of organic and conventional practices works very well. The extent to which one can move to one side or another of the spectrum depends heavily upon what natural amenities the growing location provides (eg, natural soil quality, rainfall, temperatures, disease pressure, wind, etc).

Iím all for watering as needed but with Mangos at our place it is not needed.  Grafted Black Sapote and grafted Sapodilla are a different story unless the soil is perfect, which on a larger scale takes time.  Seed grown trees of BS and Sapodilla donít require watering, for this reason we are growing replacements for BS and Sapodillas out now.  We plan on not selling our Mango fruit for the next  2 years and we are planting out all our Mango fruit seeds.  A major difference between organic and those using chemical fertilizers is you have to water if you use chemicals, whereas if you are organic watering isnít always required especially for Mangos here.  Grafted trees just donít have the vigor of seed grown trees.

The Pickering is a 5x5 mound in ground two years never been watered.
Jeff  :-)

Squam256

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Re: 2020 Mango Season (Florida)
« Reply #173 on: March 26, 2020, 03:55:56 PM »
Harvested the first regular season Rosigold today. Close to 10 days later than normal:


Frog Valley Farm

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Re: 2020 Mango Season (Florida)
« Reply #174 on: March 27, 2020, 05:29:06 AM »
Watering is always required if one wants the trees to uptake nutrients (it's the action of the water evaporating through the leaves that pulls nutrients up). In times of drought, water is going to be absorbed from deeper portions of the soil, which is typically less nutrient dense. Also, conventional fertilizers come in slow release form, which would act similarly to organic.

Water isn't required for mangoes (here in FL) if one is only interested in keeping the trees alive. For bountiful crops of quality fruit, moist soil is important. In places where rainfall isn't as plentiful as FL, only the most drought tolerant species will survive without supplemental irrigation (eg, eucalyptus).

In life, optimal outcome is generally achieved via finding a "sweet spot" or middle ground between two extremes. A mix of organic and conventional practices works very well. The extent to which one can move to one side or another of the spectrum depends heavily upon what natural amenities the growing location provides (eg, natural soil quality, rainfall, temperatures, disease pressure, wind, etc).

Iím all for watering as needed but with Mangos at our place it is not needed.  Grafted Black Sapote and grafted Sapodilla are a different story unless the soil is perfect, which on a larger scale takes time.  Seed grown trees of BS and Sapodilla donít require watering, for this reason we are growing replacements for BS and Sapodillas out now.  We plan on not selling our Mango fruit for the next  2 years and we are planting out all our Mango fruit seeds.  A major difference between organic and those using chemical fertilizers is you have to water if you use chemicals, whereas if you are organic watering isnít always required especially for Mangos here.  Grafted trees just donít have the vigor of seed grown trees.

The Pickering is a 5x5 mound in ground two years never been watered.

Okay Jeff.   I know from previous experience regarding watering that we are not supposed to disagree with you or risk harassment and being run off this site, I have no problem with leaving here..  íThis place has been a valuable source of ideas for many.  Since before I came along there was no information for Organic Growers.  According to you, your way is the only way to grow Mangos if you want fruit.  Funny how we can grow over 300 great disease free Mango trees that produce bountiful healthy fruit without ever being watered.  Disease free fruit is something you admittedly have been unable to accomplish without spraying toxic fungicides.  Unlike you, our fruit from the first bloom did not drop and we do not spray fungicides or water.  I know of plenty of other growers in Florida who produce plentiful mango fruit without ever watering their trees.  We have different philosophies and management styles.  Sorry but using slow release fertilizer is not ďsimilar to organic. ď  All the other crap and misinformation I consistently read on here from all of the  ďmango expertsĒ like yourself and a couple others,  ďdonít use compostĒ,  ďyou must water your trees to produce fruitĒ ďspray fungicidesĒ every other week, is mostly a bunch of misinformation that can be found on the back of any fertilizer bag for backyard growers seeking knowledge.  We make  biodynamic compost and start our Mango seeds in 100% pure compost without any problems.  Our Mangos that have been given the most compost do the best and produce by far the most fruit.   We use compost on our Mangos and they love it no disease no problems.  We donít have fungal issues and we do not spray.  We do not water Mangos and we have a whole lot of fruit.  Dry farmed fruit is more flavorful and can demand a higher price.  Thankfully we know what we are doing therefore we donít farm like you, this works for us, Floridaís waterways and our Mangos.   Do what makes you and your trees happy, water if you want.  Donít kill frogs, donít pollute your neighbors.  :-)🐸
« Last Edit: March 27, 2020, 07:21:58 AM by Frog Valley Farm »

 

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