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Author Topic: Question on mango tree grafting  (Read 316 times)

Clayton

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Question on mango tree grafting
« on: December 28, 2019, 01:16:22 PM »
If I graft a white pirie mango scion onto a dwarf  Julie mango tree branch, will the white pirie branch be less vigorous than a branch on a regular pirie tree?

« Last Edit: December 28, 2019, 02:18:11 PM by Clayton »

FloridaBoy

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Re: Question on mango tree grafting
« Reply #1 on: December 28, 2019, 04:27:53 PM »
100% from my experience.  But once you cut all the branches from the dwarf variety itís almost as if it gives up and the much more vigorous cultivar takes over and goes back to its original vigorous growth pattern. 

Clayton

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Re: Question on mango tree grafting
« Reply #2 on: December 28, 2019, 04:56:33 PM »
Thanks, I have been practicing grafting, so far only the top cleft graft has been working for me. I was just wondering what would happen.

I was watching chris on you tube do a Side veneer graft.. She cuts a wedge on the scion, this does not make sense to me, anyway I tried it and it failed. I will try slicing just one side of the scion on my next attempt.

« Last Edit: December 28, 2019, 05:00:14 PM by Clayton »

Orkine

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Re: Question on mango tree grafting
« Reply #3 on: December 29, 2019, 01:25:22 AM »
If we are talking about the same video, she did a side cleft.  A slight variant on the cleft in that it is not a straight down cut on the root stock.  It is different from a veneer in that it it cuts deeper and has a chance of making the union on both sides of the wedge. 

There are a couple of subtle differences.  The veneer is a thin cut straight down the rootstock while the side cleft cuts into the rootstock at a slight angle.  The scion for the veneer involves a long thin cut to match the rootstock with a tiny wedge to sit in the flap (if you leave one on the rootstock).  The side cleft on the other hand has an unbalanced wedge cut, longer on the one side than the other.
Watch the video again and don't give up on that graft.  It, like the regular cleft has worked well for me

Clayton

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Re: Question on mango tree grafting
« Reply #4 on: December 29, 2019, 02:16:35 AM »
Now that you mentioned it, the side cleft graft look different from the side veneer graft. I tried the side veneer graft today, but I did not start from the top of the scion, I used a 6 inch scion and cut out  2 inch from the bottom and notched the back end. When I attached it to the tree branch, I accidently broke the bark flap off, so the notch end was visible. I taped it all up anyway, I think my white pirie tree is getting mad.

simon_grow

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Re: Question on mango tree grafting
« Reply #5 on: December 29, 2019, 01:22:59 PM »
There are scion to rootstock and rootstock to scion affects based on both the scion and the rootstock. One variety may be dwarfed on Julie rootstock and another may grow normally.

Based on my limited experience with Julie, my grafts were dwarfed on Julie as an interstock with Florida Turpentine as the main rootstock. My Julie tree eventually died, dwarf and slow growing varieties donít do well in my marginal climate.

Iím pretty sure I posted an article regarding scion rootstock interactions but I canít find it at this moment.

Simon


simon_grow

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Re: Question on mango tree grafting
« Reply #6 on: December 29, 2019, 01:26:15 PM »

 

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