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Author Topic: Mango Tree Issues  (Read 610 times)

SanDiegoCherimoya

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Mango Tree Issues
« on: January 03, 2020, 07:03:38 PM »
New growth on some branches dries up. Some of the leaves are curled and deformed. Can anyone identify the issue and solution. Tree is in San Diego 2 miles from the coast. Lots of fungal issues in the area.

Thanks so much.
 





« Last Edit: January 03, 2020, 07:06:50 PM by SanDiegoCherimoya »

K-Rimes

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Re: Mango Tree Issues
« Reply #1 on: January 03, 2020, 07:47:54 PM »
I had many trees which I put the free local mulch on (with eucalyptus). All the trees which had this mulch had the same curl issues, and they vanished when I removed it.

Dunno if it's of any help, but it seemed to fix my curl issues.

SanDiegoCherimoya

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Re: Mango Tree Issues
« Reply #2 on: January 03, 2020, 08:01:07 PM »
I had many trees which I put the free local mulch on (with eucalyptus). All the trees which had this mulch had the same curl issues, and they vanished when I removed it.

Dunno if it's of any help, but it seemed to fix my curl issues.

Good idea. There could be fungus from the mulch causing issues.

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Tree Issues
« Reply #3 on: January 04, 2020, 10:21:10 AM »
Yes, there can be root infections by fungus or bacteria, promoted by overly soggy soil.  This reduces nutrient uptake.

Also likely is nutrient tie-up, by overly fresh mulch in heavy quantity, or by plant-suppressive substances in the leaves in the mulch.  Some trees, such as Black Walnuts, are very successful at preventing other kinds of plants from growing in the Black Walnut's leaf litter.

Your plants' leaves are showing multiple deficiencies including not enough Copper and Zinc and Boron.  Manganese and Iron are also probably inadequate.

If your tree was planted in a hole filled with compost or potting soil, the tree should be dug out and replanted in native soil.
Har

SanDiegoCherimoya

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Re: Mango Tree Issues
« Reply #4 on: January 04, 2020, 04:14:20 PM »
Yes, there can be root infections by fungus or bacteria, promoted by overly soggy soil.  This reduces nutrient uptake.

Also likely is nutrient tie-up, by overly fresh mulch in heavy quantity, or by plant-suppressive substances in the leaves in the mulch.  Some trees, such as Black Walnuts, are very successful at preventing other kinds of plants from growing in the Black Walnut's leaf litter.

Your plants' leaves are showing multiple deficiencies including not enough Copper and Zinc and Boron.  Manganese and Iron are also probably inadequate.

If your tree was planted in a hole filled with compost or potting soil, the tree should be dug out and replanted in native soil.

Thank you 🙏

beachybryan18

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Re: Mango Tree Issues
« Reply #5 on: January 08, 2020, 04:51:18 PM »
This is interesting. I've been having the same problems. I never knew that mangos don't like mulch but this could explain why I've always struggled with them, even when it seems I can keep any other tree alive. All my trees always have lots of mulch and I also often put heavy compost in the holes when planting, as it usually seems the more compost and mulch the better for trees.

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Tree Issues
« Reply #6 on: January 08, 2020, 05:55:10 PM »
One or two inches of mulch spread on the soil's surface around mango trees (but not touching the trunk), is usually beneficial.  But there is a possibility, not at all well studied, that mulch made from a particular kind of tree, could retard growth.

Mulch, compost, and highly organic-matter potting soils, when placed down in the planting hole are usually harmful.  They gather and retain too much water, even with well-drained sandy soil around the planting hole.
Har

beicadad

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Re: Mango Tree Issues
« Reply #7 on: January 09, 2020, 02:13:18 PM »
New growth on some branches dries up. Some of the leaves are curled and deformed. Can anyone identify the issue and solution. Tree is in San Diego 2 miles from the coast. Lots of fungal issues in the area.

Thanks so much.
 






I think it could just be lack of heat in San Diego winter. I have the same issue on winter flushes but the summer growth had been fine.

simon_grow

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Re: Mango Tree Issues
« Reply #8 on: January 10, 2020, 07:39:59 PM »
I agree that lack of heat can contribute to the yellowing and crinkly leaves. I believe itís actually a combination of the cold weather and fungal diseases. In the Winter, I always have some trees that yellow a bit and have some fungal damage.

It is usually the mango trees that had a late vegetative growth or that didnít harden its growth flush before the cold weather that gets the yellow leaves with burnt edges that are often crinkly.

Foliar sprays with micro/trace nutrients have not helped in my yard during cold weather. I usually just leave the tree alone until it warms up. Around June-August, sometimes beginning a little earlier and ending a bit later, we get our best vegetative flushes and you should time your fertilization regimen to maximize growth during those months.

Simon

SanDiegoCherimoya

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Re: Mango Tree Issues
« Reply #9 on: January 12, 2020, 04:03:47 AM »
I agree that lack of heat can contribute to the yellowing and crinkly leaves. I believe itís actually a combination of the cold weather and fungal diseases. In the Winter, I always have some trees that yellow a bit and have some fungal damage.

It is usually the mango trees that had a late vegetative growth or that didnít harden its growth flush before the cold weather that gets the yellow leaves with burnt edges that are often crinkly.

Foliar sprays with micro/trace nutrients have not helped in my yard during cold weather. I usually just leave the tree alone until it warms up. Around June-August, sometimes beginning a little earlier and ending a bit later, we get our best vegetative flushes and you should time your fertilization regimen to maximize growth during those months.

Simon

Thank you Simon

 

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