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Author Topic: Root Production Method  (Read 607 times)

lebmung

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Root Production Method
« on: January 20, 2020, 03:59:38 PM »
Root Production Method by Wayne Lovelace is a patented technique used to grow bigger and faster trees. Patent will expire soon if not renewed. The method is complex and is vague (perhaps intentionally).

The growing media is interesting.
"Our standard growing medium consists of 40% composted rice hulls, 40% pine bark, sand plus slow release fertilizer, micronutrients, and a wetting agent.  Air space is of utmost importance in this step. This media mix provides between 35%  has taught 40% air space."

-->Millet here you were looking for an application for rice hulls

It seems like he did an experiment with Carrizo and Citrumelo and had double sized trees.

Quote
After two years, the Carrizo Citrange that was grown traditionally had an average height of 24 inches, while RPM-grown Carrizo Citrange has reached heights over 48 inches. Results were similar with Swingle Citrumelo, with heights above three feet, while the non-RPM grown material averaged heights that did not exceed 22 inches.


http://www.science-infographics.org/scijourner2/2013/10/02/naturally-faster-growing-citrus/

I aspect the use of mycorrhiza and a certain type or fertilizer which is not divulged I suspect which type is used.

I used a similar method for papaya, avocados and mangoes so they can fruit and grow well in small containers, because they all have a very long and hard tap root which makes container cultivation almost impossible.
I did't try for citrus because I usually used cutting which don't have a tap root. But this is interesting and it's worth experimenting.


brian

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Re: Root Production Method
« Reply #1 on: January 20, 2020, 04:14:14 PM »
“the RPM system is composed of three applications that all lead to the enhanced root-mass of a plant. The first is a 12-step air-pruning process. During this process, the taproot of a plant is exposed to air, and eventually dies off. Then, several lateral roots take the place of the single taproot.

The next application to the RPM process is the bacterial fungi mycorrhizae. Mycorrhizae is a symbiotic fungi that helps the root system of a plant absorb the nutrients of a plant.

The third application of the RPM process is the soil-less media found in the containers of the plants. Pine bark, rice hulls, sand, and a wetting agent, are all used in place of soil. This allows more airspace in the container, said Lovelace, which allows for the development of a larger root system.“

This doesn’t sound significantly different from what many people on this forum are doing: air root pruning containers and soilless free draining medium.  I dont know about the specific species of fungus used here but I know my soil has fungus in it because I see mushrooms in the pots sometimes, and my recycled soil that I mix in is clearly moldy

lebmung

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Re: Root Production Method
« Reply #2 on: January 20, 2020, 04:32:57 PM »
This doesn’t sound significantly different from what many people on this forum are doing: air root pruning containers and soilless free draining medium.  I dont know about the specific species of fungus used here but I know my soil has fungus in it because I see mushrooms in the pots sometimes, and my recycled soil that I mix in is clearly moldy

Well yes people here use something similar, such as 511 mix (which I don't use and not a big fan of it), but I don't see them growing the seedlings so fast in two year. Some mycorrhizae colonize the roots and make them grow fast,  but in the same time the wrong fertilizer kills all the colonies.

brian

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Re: Root Production Method
« Reply #3 on: January 20, 2020, 04:56:46 PM »
I dont understand how the fungal symbiosis works for these kinds of trees.  With legumes you can clearly see the nodules formed on the roots.  I have never seen anything like this on fruit trees.  I wonder if there is more information on this, I haven’t tried searching

Millet

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Re: Root Production Method
« Reply #4 on: January 20, 2020, 06:10:55 PM »
As for mycorrhizae, ALL hearty/healthy citrus trees already have mycorrhizae, otherwise they'd not be healthy.  Mycorrhizae is ubiquitous, their spores are in the air.  For long term plants like citrus, even if you planted sterilized seed in sterilized soil, as long as the plant was grown in open air, it would become reinfected with mycorrhizae within a week.  Are 48 inch tall root stocks needed or even desired?  I don't believe I have ever seen a rootstock that tall.
« Last Edit: January 20, 2020, 06:13:16 PM by Millet »

lebmung

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Re: Root Production Method
« Reply #5 on: January 20, 2020, 07:38:34 PM »
I dont understand how the fungal symbiosis works for these kinds of trees.  With legumes you can clearly see the nodules formed on the roots.  I have never seen anything like this on fruit trees.  I wonder if there is more information on this, I haven’t tried searching

The nodules can be seen only with a microscope. Some of the most important are Glomus intraradices
and Trichoderma atroviride.
They are not always available in air or rainwater.

Are 48 inch tall root stocks needed or even desired?  I don't believe I have ever seen a rootstock that tall.

No, but grow them faster it helps.

brian

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Re: Root Production Method
« Reply #6 on: January 21, 2020, 10:46:28 AM »
Thanks.  I will have to check out some citrus roots under my microscope

lebmung

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Re: Root Production Method
« Reply #7 on: January 21, 2020, 11:14:07 AM »
Thanks.  I will have to check out some citrus roots under my microscope

not so easy to see them, you need contrast dye

here is how to do it:
https://www2.dijon.inrae.fr/mychintec/Protocole/protoframe.html

brian

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Re: Root Production Method
« Reply #8 on: January 21, 2020, 01:04:02 PM »
I have that too :)

Thanks

tve

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Re: Root Production Method
« Reply #9 on: March 03, 2020, 01:19:13 PM »
Is it just me or do others also find the "traditionally grown" tree in the photo better looking? Yeah, the other one is taller but it's just a slanky stick. The "traditional" one is bushier and seems to have more mass.
« Last Edit: March 03, 2020, 04:39:14 PM by tve »

Millet

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Re: Root Production Method
« Reply #10 on: March 03, 2020, 03:01:08 PM »
I agree with tve 100 percent.  The RPM tree looks horrible.  I'll stick with the traditional method.

containerman

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Re: Root Production Method
« Reply #11 on: March 09, 2020, 09:07:48 AM »
Is it just me or do others also find the "traditionally grown" tree in the photo better looking? Yeah, the other one is taller but it's just a slanky stick. The "traditional" one is bushier and seems to have more mass.

Agreed and I use a variation of the 511 mix with air pruning pots and in my wine barrels with lots of extra drainage holes. My citrus grow fast enough and are bushy with lots of new growth on them. The great thing about this medium is you cant over-water because of the mix.

I just took my Eureka lemon out of its wine barrel yesterday and that medium is over 2 years old and still looked great with no sludge/mud looking soil on the bottom. I replanted the tree in my 8x4x3foot deep raised bed along with my meyer lemon in the same bed. I also have a pinkerton and mexicola avocado in the same bed. I have the avocados on opposite corners and the same with the lemons.

 

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