Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers



Author Topic: Local invasive species most concerning to you?  (Read 2348 times)

knlim000

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 767
    • redwood city,ca
    • View Profile
Re: Local invasive species most concerning to you?
« Reply #25 on: January 26, 2020, 03:30:45 PM »
Bovine421-
anyone hunt them for food?  Looks like you can BBQ it or chop it up and make it into a pot of hot  delicious pho soup.

[/quote]

Wild Hogs in Florida wreak havoc on land in just about every area of the state.


[/quote]

SeaWalnut

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1369
    • Romania zone 6
    • View Profile
Re: Local invasive species most concerning to you?
« Reply #26 on: January 26, 2020, 05:39:32 PM »
Bovine421-
anyone hunt them for food?  Looks like you can BBQ it or chop it up and make it into a pot of hot  delicious pho soup.


Wild Hogs in Florida wreak havoc on land in just about every area of the state.


[/quote]
[/quote]
This is what they done to my small stretch of land,big holes.
Funny that they ignored the neighbours land and digged only mein but thats my fault because ive didnt cut the weeds on my land and they grew tall enough so that the wild porks could hide in it.
Picture from 2 days ago and they are native animals here but people consider them big pests altough they cant do anything to them since they are protected and if you kill one even on your land you get a vacation in jail here.
In childhood when i was hunting a lot ,ive dreamed to to hunt one but they were soo rare and soo skared by the hunters that i could never get close enough.
Now as the old generation hunters have died of old age or got too old to hunt ,they did a comeback.
I like to eat them verry much but it needs a lot of skill to prepare the meat,needs to be prepared with a special treatment and aged for at least 2 weeks after soaking it in a special spice and herbs juice, or else its too tough to eat .
If its a male then it will have a certain taste wich manny people dislike.
Wealthy people hunt them only for their tusks here and we atempted to ban sports hunting since this is not a sport.
Hunting for food its ok.
In USA ,because manny hunters dont know how to prepare the meat they just shot them and then throw them away without eating them.

bovine421

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 112
    • Half Hop Fl 9b
    • View Profile
Re: Local invasive species most concerning to you?
« Reply #27 on: January 26, 2020, 05:55:22 PM »
Bovine421-
anyone hunt them for food?  Looks like you can BBQ it or chop it up and make it into a pot of hot  delicious pho soup.



Wild Hogs in Florida wreak havoc on land in just about every area of the state.


[/quote] They trap them and feed corn for a short spell to get the gamey taste out
[/quote] These may have came from :)
 








If you would like to sample  swine here is an opportunity
http://battleatnarcoosseemill.com/

« Last Edit: January 26, 2020, 06:55:51 PM by bovine421 »
Tete Nene Julie Pickering Dot Sonpari Mallika PPK E-4 OS   Fruit Punch SweetTart Honey Kiss M-4 Neelam

EddieF

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 58
  • mangos & bananas
    • South East, Florida
    • View Profile
Re: Local invasive species most concerning to you?
« Reply #28 on: January 26, 2020, 06:04:48 PM »
Cats.  Their predator (dogs) get scooped up if stray.. but not cats!
Cats kill salamanders, frogs, mantis ect. 
Cats crap & tons of ants now have a new trail near your garden.
No salamanders left to eat the ants, ants then eat fruit trees & you.  Nasty red ants of all sizes down here.
Cats.

spaugh

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2670
    • San Diego County California
    • View Profile
Re: Local invasive species most concerning to you?
« Reply #29 on: January 26, 2020, 07:46:08 PM »
JAPANESE BEETLES are wreaking havoc on soft fleshed fruits and veggies here in Southern California, especially stone fruit trees. The worst part is they lay their eggs in your soil, the nematodes that are born then eat your roots, decomposing material, and whatever else they can, then hatch in the spring, and the cycle starts all over again. It also seems like every year they are growing in numbers and there are more beetles than the previous year.

Does anyone know of a predatory/beneficial insect that will eat/destroy the nematodes before they get the chance to hatch into beetles? Iíve tried everything on the beetles but they seem pretty bulletproof.



The larvae are grubs. They love mulch.  I think there's a beneficial nematode that kills them.  You can order them online just google beneficial nematodes for grubs.
« Last Edit: January 26, 2020, 07:47:58 PM by spaugh »
Brad Spaugh

FV Fruit Freak

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 201
    • USA, Southern California, Fountain Valley, 10B
    • View Profile
Re: Local invasive species most concerning to you?
« Reply #30 on: January 26, 2020, 10:39:43 PM »
JAPANESE BEETLES are wreaking havoc on soft fleshed fruits and veggies here in Southern California, especially stone fruit trees. The worst part is they lay their eggs in your soil, the nematodes that are born then eat your roots, decomposing material, and whatever else they can, then hatch in the spring, and the cycle starts all over again. It also seems like every year they are growing in numbers and there are more beetles than the previous year.

Does anyone know of a predatory/beneficial insect that will eat/destroy the nematodes before they get the chance to hatch into beetles? Iíve tried everything on the beetles but they seem pretty bulletproof.



The larvae are grubs. They love mulch.  I think there's a beneficial nematode that kills them.  You can order them online just google beneficial nematodes for grubs.

Thanks Brad, Iíll check them out. So do you think the grubs turn into the beetles then?
Nate Dogg

spaugh

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2670
    • San Diego County California
    • View Profile
Re: Local invasive species most concerning to you?
« Reply #31 on: January 26, 2020, 11:33:39 PM »
Brad Spaugh

spaugh

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2670
    • San Diego County California
    • View Profile
Re: Local invasive species most concerning to you?
« Reply #32 on: January 26, 2020, 11:36:59 PM »
Theres swarms of them here in summer because I use so much mulch.  I go to the neighbors and they have very few.  Once a bird pecks your stone fruits, the beetles go for it.  The key is to bag or net the trees and keep birds off the fruit.  You can also paint rocks the color of peaches or whatever you grow and hang them in the trees.  The birds will leave them alone if you do this before your fruits get ripe.  Just toss some red rocks out there in the trees early in the year. 
Brad Spaugh

JakeFruit

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 124
  • Gulf Coast of Florida
    • zone 10A
    • View Profile
Re: Local invasive species most concerning to you?
« Reply #33 on: January 27, 2020, 08:39:42 AM »
JAPANESE BEETLES[...]

I remember these from my 1970's youth in Northern Georgia. We'd catch them in the summer and tie a string around one back leg, they'd whirl around in circles tethered by the string. Never thought they might not be native, but there sure were a lot of them...

Mugenia

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 212
    • People's Socialist Republic of California USDA Zone 10
    • View Profile
Re: Local invasive species most concerning to you?
« Reply #34 on: January 27, 2020, 10:25:36 AM »
I hated these bugs when I used to live in NE Georgia. They are stinky like a mofo.

SF

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 19
    • San Diego, CA
    • View Profile
Re: Local invasive species most concerning to you?
« Reply #35 on: January 27, 2020, 03:27:24 PM »
Spanish needles, hemlock and the biggest concern is with the russian tumbleweeds. Did not realize the magnitude of the russian tumbleweed problem.

Pokeweed

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 138
    • Houston TX
    • View Profile
Re: Local invasive species most concerning to you?
« Reply #36 on: January 28, 2020, 08:50:40 AM »
The state of Texas has as many wild hogs as people. It is open hunting season 24/7/365. They do an amazing amount of damage. I had a small sugar cane planting that I was trying to expand and they dug it up roots and all. They dug my Jerusalem artichoke patch, got every one. A few years ago a poison was tested and almost approved by the state, but ultimately rejected do to possible unintended consequences. I have a cousin that rents his pasture for $150. a day for hog hunts. The up side is backstrap is tasty! D.

bovine421

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 112
    • Half Hop Fl 9b
    • View Profile
Re: Local invasive species most concerning to you?
« Reply #37 on: June 28, 2020, 03:43:23 PM »
Erinose mite I found this from article  Researchers, agriculture officials, and growers are asking anyone and everyone with a lychee tree ó whether one or several acres of them ó to look for signs of Aceria litchii, known as the lychee erinose mite, after a tree was found infested in a North Miami homeowner's yard last month.

The tiny mites, which originated in Asia, are so small their chubby sectioned bodies can be fully seen only under an electron microscope. This isn't the first time they've appeared in Florida over the past century, though, but when they were found on Lee County's lychee trees in early 2018, the state enacted a quarantine and ordered the area's growers to refrain from distributing the fruit.

"They can [move around] pretty easily ó they can be on your clothes, they can be on your tools, and honeybees can move them around," says Jeff Wasielewski, a tropical fruit expert who works for the University of Florida and Miami-Dade County. I wonder what other plants are effected? I just bought Emperor Lychee Yikes!!!






« Last Edit: June 28, 2020, 04:00:13 PM by bovine421 »
Tete Nene Julie Pickering Dot Sonpari Mallika PPK E-4 OS   Fruit Punch SweetTart Honey Kiss M-4 Neelam

Epicatt2

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 43
  • Starting a fruit forest
    • Tampa, FL / Zone 9b
    • View Profile
Re: Local invasive species most concerning to you?
« Reply #38 on: June 28, 2020, 05:04:21 PM »
My biggest concern is the bigheaded ant (BHA) Pheidole megacephala which farm scales and aphids on my ornamentals, on my fruit trees, and have really impacted my orchids.  These BHAs even farm the pests on the plants' roots under the soil.

They've proven so far next to impossible to get rid of since they have multiple mounds with coŲperating queens.  You kill one mound and the ants are repopulated from the other mounds in the area.

The Division of Plant Industry in Gainesville, FL so far doesn't seem to have any concrete solution for getting rid of these awful ants.  The BHAs seem to be unaffected and walk right through whatever poison we've sprayed with or broadcast around the yard.

The only success I've had against them is by using systemic Imidacloprid which affects the scale and aphids that these ants are farming.  Once the Imidacloprid is applied the BHAs abandon the treated plants.  But the Imidacloprid must be re-applied preiodically since when it wears off the BHAs return to farming on the same plants they were bothering before.

Anyone have a better way to deal with these BHAs?  Fingers X-ed!

Paul M.
==
« Last Edit: June 29, 2020, 12:18:19 AM by Epicatt2 »

SeaWalnut

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1369
    • Romania zone 6
    • View Profile
Re: Local invasive species most concerning to you?
« Reply #39 on: June 28, 2020, 06:07:54 PM »
My biggest concert is the bigheaded ants(BHA) Pheidole megacephala which farm scales and aphids on my ornamentals, my fruit trees, and have really impacted my orchids.  These BHAs even farm the pests on the plants' roots under the soil.

They've proven so far next to impossible to get rid of since they have multiple mounds with coŲperating queens.  You kill one mound and the ants are repopulated from the other mounds in the area.

The Division of Plant Industry in Gainesville, FL so far doesn't seem to have any concrete solution for getting rid of these awful ants.  The BHAs seem to be unaffected and walk right through whatever poison we've sprayed with or broadcast around the yard.

The only success I've had against them is by using systemic Imidacloprid which affects the scale and aphids that these ants are farming.  Once the Imidacloprid is applied the BHAs abandon the treated plants.  But the Imidacloprid must be re-applied preiodically since when it wears off the BHAs return to farming on the same plants they were bothering before.

Anyone have a better way to deal with these BHAs?  Fingers X-ed!

Paul M.
==
To kill aphids you can use horticultural soap( or dishwasher detergent).
Or you can try to experiment with essential oils to kill the aphids.
Thyme oil for instance,mixed with dish soap then with water.
Thyme oil kills mites,aphids, dog ticks and such tiny insects but be sure to test it so it doesnt kill your plant as well.
I have no doses to reccomend and i didnt used this for aphids but im sure it works well and will experiment with it in the future.
Ive used it for bees to kill the mites from them and its not just the thyme oil that works but manny otther essential oils also.
If you discover a concoction that works,you can even patent it. :D

forumfool

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 248
    • Canton, GA 7b
    • View Profile
Re: Local invasive species most concerning to you?
« Reply #40 on: June 28, 2020, 06:15:21 PM »
Milky spore will kill Japanese beetle grubs

Epicatt2

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 43
  • Starting a fruit forest
    • Tampa, FL / Zone 9b
    • View Profile
Re: Local invasive species most concerning to you?
« Reply #41 on: June 29, 2020, 12:36:42 AM »
To kill aphids you can use horticultural soap( or dishwasher detergent).
Or you can try to experiment with essential oils to kill the aphids.
Thyme oil for instance,mixed with dish soap then with water.
Thyme oil kills mites,aphids, dog ticks and such tiny insects but be sure to test it so it doesnt kill your plant as well.
I have no doses to reccomend and i didnt used this for aphids but im sure it works well and will experiment with it in the future.
[snip]

We have already tried such things as you've suggested but to no avail. Problem is Sea Walnut, if you were to kiil the aphids or the scales, the BHAs just bring more of them back to the plants and continue farming them.

Using the Imidacloprid, which is systemic, keeps the aphids, scales, etc. from reproducing and so they finally die without being able to reproduce.  Once that happens the BHAs cannot increase their harvest of honeydew from the aphids, etc., on those treated plants.  And when that happens the BHAs move on to any untreated plants in the area where they can still farm aphids and scales, etc.  So the Imidacloprid granules must be used to treat any/all the plants that one wishes to protect from the BHAs.

And as I explaned previously the BHA seems impervious to any of the usual pesticides one would usually use for ants. They just walk right on thru it.

Regards,

Paul M.
==


giorgosgr.

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 131
    • Attika, Greece zone 9b
    • View Profile
Re: Local invasive species most concerning to you?
« Reply #42 on: June 29, 2020, 01:07:57 AM »
For me the most invasive is Cercis siliquastrum and figs. Cersis is really tough to get rid of because of the taproot that always sprouts unless you take it out. And if you leave an area for only one year they grow like grass. Also figs are really hard to get rid of, for the same reason. They grow wild all around the farm and birds eat them and scatter the seeds.

palingkecil

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 166
    • Los Angeles
    • View Profile
Re: Local invasive species most concerning to you?
« Reply #43 on: June 29, 2020, 02:16:28 AM »
To kill aphids you can use horticultural soap( or dishwasher detergent).
Or you can try to experiment with essential oils to kill the aphids.
Thyme oil for instance,mixed with dish soap then with water.
Thyme oil kills mites,aphids, dog ticks and such tiny insects but be sure to test it so it doesnt kill your plant as well.
I have no doses to reccomend and i didnt used this for aphids but im sure it works well and will experiment with it in the future.
[snip]

We have already tried such things as you've suggested but to no avail. Problem is Sea Walnut, if you were to kiil the aphids or the scales, the BHAs just bring more of them back to the plants and continue farming them.

Using the Imidacloprid, which is systemic, keeps the aphids, scales, etc. from reproducing and so they finally die without being able to reproduce.  Once that happens the BHAs cannot increase their harvest of honeydew from the aphids, etc., on those treated plants.  And when that happens the BHAs move on to any untreated plants in the area where they can still farm aphids and scales, etc.  So the Imidacloprid granules must be used to treat any/all the plants that one wishes to protect from the BHAs.

And as I explaned previously the BHA seems impervious to any of the usual pesticides one would usually use for ants. They just walk right on thru it.

Regards,

Paul M.
==

I am not expert at all, a newbie in gardening. I had big issue with the mutual symbiosis between aphids and ants before. Tried to spray with mineral oil, dish detergent, etc, and only worked temporarily. This year I use tangle foot on all my trees, spring is the best time to do it. Papaya tree nursery has a really good video on youtube on how to apply tangle foot on flag tape wrapped around the tree. Works like a charm from me.

SeaWalnut

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1369
    • Romania zone 6
    • View Profile
Re: Local invasive species most concerning to you?
« Reply #44 on: June 29, 2020, 02:49:37 AM »
To kill aphids you can use horticultural soap( or dishwasher detergent).
Or you can try to experiment with essential oils to kill the aphids.
Thyme oil for instance,mixed with dish soap then with water.
Thyme oil kills mites,aphids, dog ticks and such tiny insects but be sure to test it so it doesnt kill your plant as well.
I have no doses to reccomend and i didnt used this for aphids but im sure it works well and will experiment with it in the future.
[snip]

We have already tried such things as you've suggested but to no avail. Problem is Sea Walnut, if you were to kiil the aphids or the scales, the BHAs just bring more of them back to the plants and continue farming them.

Using the Imidacloprid, which is systemic, keeps the aphids, scales, etc. from reproducing and so they finally die without being able to reproduce.  Once that happens the BHAs cannot increase their harvest of honeydew from the aphids, etc., on those treated plants.  And when that happens the BHAs move on to any untreated plants in the area where they can still farm aphids and scales, etc.  So the Imidacloprid granules must be used to treat any/all the plants that one wishes to protect from the BHAs.

And as I explaned previously the BHA seems impervious to any of the usual pesticides one would usually use for ants. They just walk right on thru it.

Regards,

Paul M.
==
You used essential oil?
There is a big difference between horticultural ( cooking oil) and essential oil.
Essential oils are soo poisonous that a teaspoon can kill a human.
To kill mites you add just 20-30 drops for a gallon ,not 2 big tablespoons like horticultural oil.
Also essential oil acts different from horticultural oil.

Tropheus76

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 796
    • East Orlando 9B
    • View Profile
Re: Local invasive species most concerning to you?
« Reply #45 on: June 29, 2020, 09:37:13 AM »
Lionfish. Beautiful little suckers to see, brave beyond belief. A couple can wipe out a reef of its small fishes. Good part is they are stupid and will let you spear one and its neighbor wont even move away. Supposedly they are one of the better tasting fish to eat too.

ScottR

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1709
    • USA,Arroyo Grande,Calif. 93420,zone 9b
    • View Profile
Re: Local invasive species most concerning to you?
« Reply #46 on: June 29, 2020, 10:48:59 AM »
Pocket Gophers and cotton tail bunny's :-[ They are trying to take over this California ancient sand doon :-[ >:(

JulianoGS

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 103
    • USA, South Florida
    • View Profile
Re: Local invasive species most concerning to you?
« Reply #47 on: June 29, 2020, 04:00:33 PM »
Snake head fish, nasty one!

Be not deceived; GOD is not mocked: for whatsoever a man soweth, that shall he also reap.
Galatians 6:7

SeaWalnut

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1369
    • Romania zone 6
    • View Profile
Re: Local invasive species most concerning to you?
« Reply #48 on: June 29, 2020, 05:33:03 PM »
Snake head fish, nasty one!

This is most dangerous iet manny fishermans in your state are happy about them.
Have seen somme catch and release them.
Now compare this beast with the peacefull, beneficial jumping carp that reduces pollution ,doesnt harm anything iet its soo much hated.

palingkecil

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 166
    • Los Angeles
    • View Profile
Re: Local invasive species most concerning to you?
« Reply #49 on: June 29, 2020, 05:58:09 PM »
Snake head fish, nasty one!

If anyone can ship them frozen to california for a reasonable price, i will buy them. This is one of the most nutritious fish we eat in Indonesia.

 

Copyright © Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers