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Author Topic: Valencia orange in the ultra tropics  (Read 474 times)

sunny

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Valencia orange in the ultra tropics
« on: February 07, 2020, 05:54:22 AM »
Our day/night temperatures are always around 30 celcius...25-37 all year..is it worth a try to grow valencia oranges in this climate?

Dekopons grow and fruit well here but the taste is not good.

Should i plant one or better try to find something like a washington navel or so?

sunny

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Re: Valencia orange in the ultra tropics
« Reply #1 on: February 07, 2020, 05:56:24 AM »
Oh sorry, this was meant for the citrus forum. Moderator move it please.

Oolie

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Re: Valencia orange in the ultra tropics
« Reply #2 on: February 09, 2020, 02:23:06 AM »
I imagine the Valencia will taste worse than Shiranui in your climate.

Limes should be excellent though.

sunny

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Re: Valencia orange in the ultra tropics
« Reply #3 on: February 10, 2020, 09:04:25 PM »
I imagine the Valencia will taste worse than Shiranui in your climate.

Limes should be excellent though.

Limes are widely available here but we don't eat them...pomelo's are also great and doing well but they are hard to peel.

Well i will try it out, you never know untill you tried.

Oolie

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Re: Valencia orange in the ultra tropics
« Reply #4 on: February 11, 2020, 12:20:36 AM »
I didn't realize how much I liked limes until I got to Japan and they were 3$ each.

Ceviche never cost so much or tasted so good.

The Philipines has a decent Valencia orange substitute, Dalandan or Talamisan. It's a sweet orange, and about as close as you get in the ultratropics.

I would grow one alongside the Valencia, in case it's more to your liking.

That said, fresh squeezed Valencia juice from SoCal harvested fruit is a nice energy drink.

sunny

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Re: Valencia orange in the ultra tropics
« Reply #5 on: February 11, 2020, 05:53:18 AM »
I didn't realize how much I liked limes until I got to Japan and they were 3$ each.

Ceviche never cost so much or tasted so good.

The Philipines has a decent Valencia orange substitute, Dalandan or Talamisan. It's a sweet orange, and about as close as you get in the ultratropics.

I would grow one alongside the Valencia, in case it's more to your liking.

That said, fresh squeezed Valencia juice from SoCal harvested fruit is a nice energy drink.


What limes did you eat in Japan? Kishu or other special ones? We have the normal green small lime here, very cheap, nice juice but i never ate one pure.

Japan has so many citrus varieties, it's a paradise for citrus lovers.

Mark in Texas

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Re: Valencia orange in the ultra tropics
« Reply #6 on: February 11, 2020, 09:11:07 AM »
Valencia is one of the best.  It's a late orange with plenty of juice, sugar and few seeds.  Older trees are cold hardy down to low to mid 20's, IF, you don't have warm weather before the big one hits.

Another great one and very much like an orange, maybe superior is the Orlando Tangelo.  Cold hardy too.  This tree was loaded.  Fruit was excellent.




Oolie

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Re: Valencia orange in the ultra tropics
« Reply #7 on: February 11, 2020, 11:20:57 PM »
I didn't realize how much I liked limes until I got to Japan and they were 3$ each.

Ceviche never cost so much or tasted so good.

The Philipines has a decent Valencia orange substitute, Dalandan or Talamisan. It's a sweet orange, and about as close as you get in the ultratropics.

I would grow one alongside the Valencia, in case it's more to your liking.

That said, fresh squeezed Valencia juice from SoCal harvested fruit is a nice energy drink.



What limes did you eat in Japan? Kishu or other special ones? We have the normal green small lime here, very cheap, nice juice but i never ate one pure.

Japan has so many citrus varieties, it's a paradise for citrus lovers.
I think it must have been a bearss hence the price. Limes are not part of Japanese cuisine due to the limited frost-free area.

The small green one sounds like what is marketed as mexican or key lime in America.

Sounds like you are looking for fruit for eating out of hand. I really like tangelos like Shiranui and Minneola, especially in your climate. But my tastes may be different from yours.

Here in So-Cal, I harvested a bucket of Washington Navel Oranges. They only received rain that exists normally here, something like 16" over the last year. Since they haven't been getting watered, the fruit are very small, and extra strong. I really enjoy the concentrated sugars and acidity, as well as the extra concentrated flavor.

It may be hard in an area that receives as much rainfall as you do to get similar results.

sunny

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Re: Valencia orange in the ultra tropics
« Reply #8 on: February 12, 2020, 09:19:48 PM »
I didn't realize how much I liked limes until I got to Japan and they were 3$ each.

Ceviche never cost so much or tasted so good.

The Philipines has a decent Valencia orange substitute, Dalandan or Talamisan. It's a sweet orange, and about as close as you get in the ultratropics.

I would grow one alongside the Valencia, in case it's more to your liking.

That said, fresh squeezed Valencia juice from SoCal harvested fruit is a nice energy drink.



What limes did you eat in Japan? Kishu or other special ones? We have the normal green small lime here, very cheap, nice juice but i never ate one pure.

Japan has so many citrus varieties, it's a paradise for citrus lovers.
I think it must have been a bearss hence the price. Limes are not part of Japanese cuisine due to the limited frost-free area.

The small green one sounds like what is marketed as mexican or key lime in America.

Sounds like you are looking for fruit for eating out of hand. I really like tangelos like Shiranui and Minneola, especially in your climate. But my tastes may be different from yours.

Here in So-Cal, I harvested a bucket of Washington Navel Oranges. They only received rain that exists normally here, something like 16" over the last year. Since they haven't been getting watered, the fruit are very small, and extra strong. I really enjoy the concentrated sugars and acidity, as well as the extra concentrated flavor.

It may be hard in an area that receives as much rainfall as you do to get similar results.

Well i water my tree's every other day. I have some dekopons now which grow much slower than the first ones of the trees. Those got orange spots which became brown later and the flesh under those spots wasn't good at all...the rest was okay but not the great dekopon taste like in japan. They were watery, little sweet, no acidic taste.

I won't kill the dekopons yet, but am already collecting replacement tree's. I have never seen valencia grown in thailand, i wonder why....

Citrus really needs cold i think, we do have nice mandarins though from north thailand and very nice pomelo's from all over the country. But to peel a pomelo is a hard job, especially when it's very hot.

There are no nice oranges in thailand, mandarins do better...i still want to find a real washington navel orange tree and grow it.


Oolie

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Re: Valencia orange in the ultra tropics
« Reply #9 on: February 12, 2020, 09:51:43 PM »
I would seek out tangelos. The Minneola is a very good one, which does well enough in Florida where conditions are more similar to yours than where sweet oranges are often grown. I don't really care for the Florida grown sweet oranges with a few exceptions. That said, there's not a whole lot of commercially grown citrus I find very appealing. The Minneola Tangelo is an exception, and it can be excellent. Peels like a mandarin, intense mandarin-like flavor, in a fruit whose size is closer to that of a sweet orange. It is also able to retain much of the acidity that is lost in fruit grown in climates absent of cold.

The Dekopon is supposedly a tangelo, but in my experience, the quality varies strongly, with those being grown in South-Western Japan being very good to eat. The soil in California by and large does not resemble the soil of Japan. There are a few areas where there is similar soil, but the soil combined with the humid climate and large temperature range is not something found in much of California at all. There are some areas with each factor, but they just aren't found together.

sunny

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Re: Valencia orange in the ultra tropics
« Reply #10 on: February 14, 2020, 09:54:05 AM »
I would seek out tangelos. The Minneola is a very good one, which does well enough in Florida where conditions are more similar to yours than where sweet oranges are often grown. I don't really care for the Florida grown sweet oranges with a few exceptions. That said, there's not a whole lot of commercially grown citrus I find very appealing. The Minneola Tangelo is an exception, and it can be excellent. Peels like a mandarin, intense mandarin-like flavor, in a fruit whose size is closer to that of a sweet orange. It is also able to retain much of the acidity that is lost in fruit grown in climates absent of cold.

The Dekopon is supposedly a tangelo, but in my experience, the quality varies strongly, with those being grown in South-Western Japan being very good to eat. The soil in California by and large does not resemble the soil of Japan. There are a few areas where there is similar soil, but the soil combined with the humid climate and large temperature range is not something found in much of California at all. There are some areas with each factor, but they just aren't found together.

It is very hard to find tangelo's in thailand, i was very happy to find grafted dekopon tree's so i bought many...but they are not very nice...i wait for new harvest before i replace the tree's...hopefully they will taste better next crop..

In Japan the fruit is not a dekopon if the brix isn't above 13...but without any acid they are boring to eat.

I would also like to grow gold nugget, maybe i find the tree's here one day. But for now my best bet is on my 3 pomelo tree's.

Oolie

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Re: Valencia orange in the ultra tropics
« Reply #11 on: February 14, 2020, 03:33:03 PM »
I would seek out tangelos. The Minneola is a very good one, which does well enough in Florida where conditions are more similar to yours than where sweet oranges are often grown. I don't really care for the Florida grown sweet oranges with a few exceptions. That said, there's not a whole lot of commercially grown citrus I find very appealing. The Minneola Tangelo is an exception, and it can be excellent. Peels like a mandarin, intense mandarin-like flavor, in a fruit whose size is closer to that of a sweet orange. It is also able to retain much of the acidity that is lost in fruit grown in climates absent of cold.

The Dekopon is supposedly a tangelo, but in my experience, the quality varies strongly, with those being grown in South-Western Japan being very good to eat. The soil in California by and large does not resemble the soil of Japan. There are a few areas where there is similar soil, but the soil combined with the humid climate and large temperature range is not something found in much of California at all. There are some areas with each factor, but they just aren't found together.

It is very hard to find tangelo's in thailand, i was very happy to find grafted dekopon tree's so i bought many...but they are not very nice...i wait for new harvest before i replace the tree's...hopefully they will taste better next crop..

In Japan the fruit is not a dekopon if the brix isn't above 13...but without any acid they are boring to eat.

I would also like to grow gold nugget, maybe i find the tree's here one day. But for now my best bet is on my 3 pomelo tree's.

Of the Shiranui I tried in Japan, the brix was likely in the 15-20 range, but it was balanced with the right amount of acidity, not super intense like the citrus I grow, more balanced and subtle, a treat you crave more of. The texture was also perfect, not a feature you read much about, but it added to the experience.

Gold nugget mandarin is widely planted here. I have tasted many, but enjoyed few. Some were excellent fruit which were reminiscent of a Pixie mandarin, but most I have tried had an off-flavor that reminded me of cilantro. For reference I don't taste soap in the cilantro.

 

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