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Author Topic: "Har's List of Supremely Delicious Mango Varieties"  (Read 5387 times)

MangoCountry

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Re: "Har's List of Supremely Delicious Mango Varieties"
« Reply #50 on: April 21, 2020, 10:06:45 AM »
A properly ripened Mallika is very similar in flavor to Lemon Zest.
Agreed, although I find it even more comparable to Orange Sherbet, in fact almost identical

Cookie Monster

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Re: "Har's List of Supremely Delicious Mango Varieties"
« Reply #51 on: April 21, 2020, 10:24:06 AM »
Agree. However, they tend to be very finicky, and flavor can be all over the map.

A properly ripened Mallika is very similar in flavor to Lemon Zest.
Agreed, although I find it even more comparable to Orange Sherbet, in fact almost identical
Jeff  :-)

Squam256

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Re: "Har's List of Supremely Delicious Mango Varieties"
« Reply #52 on: April 22, 2020, 09:22:29 AM »
A properly ripened Mallika is very similar in flavor to Lemon Zest.
Whoa!  Really, Alex?

Mallika is a hybrid between Neelam and Dasheri, but it really doesnít taste like Neelam at all. It inherited its flavor from the Dasheri which is known for having that citrus component.

Dasheri is originally from  northern India in the area of Lucknow. A theory that Ive mentioned here before and I think may hold merit is that the citrus-flavored Burmese/Lemon Meringue mangos And the Dasheri May share a common ancestor. Not only is their flavor similar, but they have similar shape, color, and another interesting trait: you may have noticed before that Lemon Meringue And Lemon Zest Can get these green splotches in their pigmentation when they ripen. One of the mangos that also gets that same green splotch pigmentation? Mallika.
« Last Edit: April 22, 2020, 09:39:17 AM by Squam256 »

johnb51

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Re: "Har's List of Supremely Delicious Mango Varieties"
« Reply #53 on: April 22, 2020, 11:02:06 AM »
That's supremely interesting about Mallika.  I grew it for the first time in Coconut Creek in 1998. And then again in about 2015 in Deerfield Beach.  The flavor was different in the two locations.
John

Oolie

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Re: "Har's List of Supremely Delicious Mango Varieties"
« Reply #54 on: April 22, 2020, 12:48:39 PM »
Lemon Zest flushed early this year, and all the new vegetation looks pretty sad in the cold, wet weather. Mallika did not flush, but its hardened-off growth looks excellent despite the cold, wet weather.

Oolie

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Re: "Har's List of Supremely Delicious Mango Varieties"
« Reply #55 on: April 23, 2020, 04:18:30 AM »
A properly ripened Mallika is very similar in flavor to Lemon Zest.
Whoa!  Really, Alex?

Mallika is a hybrid between Neelam and Dasheri, but it really doesnít taste like Neelam at all. It inherited its flavor from the Dasheri which is known for having that citrus component.

Dasheri is originally from  northern India in the area of Lucknow. A theory that Ive mentioned here before and I think may hold merit is that the citrus-flavored Burmese/Lemon Meringue mangos And the Dasheri May share a common ancestor. Not only is their flavor similar, but they have similar shape, color, and another interesting trait: you may have noticed before that Lemon Meringue And Lemon Zest Can get these green splotches in their pigmentation when they ripen. One of the mangos that also gets that same green splotch pigmentation? Mallika.
Since PPK lacks the green spotting, and the LZ has a flavor more similar to Mallika, doesn't that imply that Mallika may be the pollen parent of LZ?

Time for some mango daytime TV.

Tommyng

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Re: "Har's List of Supremely Delicious Mango Varieties"
« Reply #56 on: April 23, 2020, 04:28:33 AM »
Iíve tried mallika before, itís an excellent mango. It was so good I have a tree. There are people that seem to hate it but thatís true of all things. Iíve picked it when tree ripened and stored it to ripen and both turned out good mangos.
Donít rush, take time and enjoy life and food.

Squam256

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Re: "Har's List of Supremely Delicious Mango Varieties"
« Reply #57 on: April 23, 2020, 07:30:16 AM »
A properly ripened Mallika is very similar in flavor to Lemon Zest.
Whoa!  Really, Alex?

Mallika is a hybrid between Neelam and Dasheri, but it really doesnít taste like Neelam at all. It inherited its flavor from the Dasheri which is known for having that citrus component.

Dasheri is originally from  northern India in the area of Lucknow. A theory that Ive mentioned here before and I think may hold merit is that the citrus-flavored Burmese/Lemon Meringue mangos And the Dasheri May share a common ancestor. Not only is their flavor similar, but they have similar shape, color, and another interesting trait: you may have noticed before that Lemon Meringue And Lemon Zest Can get these green splotches in their pigmentation when they ripen. One of the mangos that also gets that same green splotch pigmentation? Mallika.
Since PPK lacks the green spotting, and the LZ has a flavor more similar to Mallika, doesn't that imply that Mallika may be the pollen parent of LZ?

Time for some mango daytime TV.

PPK does get the green spotting actually, although LZ seems to get it more.

Pan Dulce

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Re: "Har's List of Supremely Delicious Mango Varieties"
« Reply #58 on: April 24, 2020, 02:08:29 PM »
Who needs to worry about coronavirus when you can eat some fruit, that recently received a 12 or 24 hour REI pesticide spray.




johnb51

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Re: "Har's List of Supremely Delicious Mango Varieties"
« Reply #59 on: April 24, 2020, 07:05:32 PM »
Who needs to worry about coronavirus when you can eat some fruit, that recently received a 12 or 24 hour REI pesticide spray.
??
John

Cookie Monster

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Re: "Har's List of Supremely Delicious Mango Varieties"
« Reply #60 on: April 24, 2020, 07:36:55 PM »
Even the OMRI listed pesticides have a 12+ hour REI. Good old copper oxide (Nordox 75 for example) has a reentry interval of 12 hours. We use copper as cookware, jewelry, plumbing, etc, so it seems a bit overboard to have a 12 hour REI for copper oxide. However, I think the EPA is a bit over conservative with regards to pesticides.

Who needs to worry about coronavirus when you can eat some fruit, that recently received a 12 or 24 hour REI pesticide spray.
Jeff  :-)

Mark in Texas

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Re: "Har's List of Supremely Delicious Mango Varieties"
« Reply #61 on: April 26, 2020, 09:06:10 AM »
We are a country of fearful neurotics and hypochondriacs.  Here's a quote from a SoCal avocado growing group I belong to:

"I've heard a few people mention white washing the bark of your tree and I don't understand why one would need to paint a tree with a chemical based paint? I want all the trees in my yard to be 100% organic. so tell me what white washing is and why it's important? Is it important? I live in Claremont California."

My response:

$%*(@#@$$, so you've run a lab analysis on such painted tissue and found levels of "chemicals" exceed EPA standards, what exactly are those chemicals? 95% of the organic/natural movement is a joke based on fear and ignorance. Having said that I have been pushing a spray of kaolin clay wettable powder not because I'm a fearful neurotic but because it's cheap and a helluva lot easier to mix and apply. https://www.groworganic.com/products/surround-25-lb...

Don't know if Captan would help but it has no REI interval posted on our Aggie vineyard pesticide list.

johnb51

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Re: "Har's List of Supremely Delicious Mango Varieties"
« Reply #62 on: April 26, 2020, 10:53:16 AM »
Har's List of Essential Oddities.  (I really like Dot and would like to try Coconut Cream and Ice Cream.)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9G-fvKm5BUk

I'm bumping this up so y'all can see the new video.
« Last Edit: April 26, 2020, 08:38:17 PM by johnb51 »
John

johnb51

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Re: "Har's List of Supremely Delicious Mango Varieties"
« Reply #63 on: April 26, 2020, 08:39:25 PM »
Har's latest.
John

Cookie Monster

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Re: "Har's List of Supremely Delicious Mango Varieties"
« Reply #64 on: April 26, 2020, 09:06:53 PM »
:D Yah, it's gotten overboard. What I find humorous is that Bruce Ames (previous chair of biochem at Berkeley) proved that organic produce is higher in carcinogens than conventional back in the 80's.

Life is full of pendulum swings. In the 40's, 50's and 60's the general public was enamored with lab created foods, pesticides, etc, the mindset being that technology could improve on nature. All sorts of nutty pesticides were used back then, with reckless abandon. (My step-father grew up on a farm during this time period and ended up coming down with cancer in his 60's.)

Then, in the 60's and 70's a small group of folks began pushing against the pesticides of the day (eg, Silent Spring), and in the 80's the organic movement started to rise. Then, somewhere in the 2000's I guess, organic went mainstream and really took root in the millenial generation, who I think viewed it as some sort of counter-cultural ideal.

The EPA has come a long way since the 1960s, and modern pesticides (as well as worker protocols) render their use quite safe. But, the pendulum has swung very hard to the opposite extreme, where the mainstream mindset is that anything produced in a lab is harmful (and contrariwise anything originating in nature is good / beneficial).

The truth almost always lies somewhere in the middle of two extremes. However, it's human nature to polarize on extremes.

We are a country of fearful neurotics and hypochondriacs.  Here's a quote from a SoCal avocado growing group I belong to:

"I've heard a few people mention white washing the bark of your tree and I don't understand why one would need to paint a tree with a chemical based paint? I want all the trees in my yard to be 100% organic. so tell me what white washing is and why it's important? Is it important? I live in Claremont California."

My response:

$%*(@#@$$, so you've run a lab analysis on such painted tissue and found levels of "chemicals" exceed EPA standards, what exactly are those chemicals? 95% of the organic/natural movement is a joke based on fear and ignorance. Having said that I have been pushing a spray of kaolin clay wettable powder not because I'm a fearful neurotic but because it's cheap and a helluva lot easier to mix and apply. https://www.groworganic.com/products/surround-25-lb...

Don't know if Captan would help but it has no REI interval posted on our Aggie vineyard pesticide list.
Jeff  :-)

johnb51

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Re: "Har's List of Supremely Delicious Mango Varieties"
« Reply #65 on: April 26, 2020, 11:06:28 PM »
I'd say anything that conserves soil and soil health, forests, aquifers, and ocean health is good even though it's not a perfect world.  I hope you guys, Jeff and Mark, don't consider that a radical idea.  (Or call me a freakin' radical, whatever.)  Hey, how about Har's List of Essential Oddities?
« Last Edit: April 26, 2020, 11:10:53 PM by johnb51 »
John

Cookie Monster

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Re: "Har's List of Supremely Delicious Mango Varieties"
« Reply #66 on: April 26, 2020, 11:57:50 PM »
I think we're in agreement there. But, latex paint on an avocado tree certainly isn't mutually exclusive with those goals :-).

I'd say anything that conserves soil and soil health, forests, aquifers, and ocean health is good even though it's not a perfect world.  I hope you guys, Jeff and Mark, don't consider that a radical idea.  (Or call me a freakin' radical, whatever.)  Hey, how about Har's List of Essential Oddities?
Jeff  :-)

Tommyng

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Re: "Har's List of Supremely Delicious Mango Varieties"
« Reply #67 on: April 27, 2020, 06:35:29 AM »
I'd say anything that conserves soil and soil health, forests, aquifers, and ocean health is good even though it's not a perfect world.  I hope you guys, Jeff and Mark, don't consider that a radical idea.  (Or call me a freakin' radical, whatever.)  Hey, how about Har's List of Essential Oddities?

Itís good to have our own beliefs but the end goals should be the health of the people and the planet we live on. Sadly, it never is. Now about the carrie mango, so much conflicting information, half seems to like it and half donít.
Donít rush, take time and enjoy life and food.

johnb51

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Re: "Har's List of Supremely Delicious Mango Varieties"
« Reply #68 on: April 27, 2020, 08:49:02 AM »
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9G-fvKm5BUk

Did you miss this, Tommy?  THE ESSENTIAL ODDITIES.

Jeff, I'm okay with latex paint on avocado tree trunks.  (Try to keep it off the leaves!)
« Last Edit: April 27, 2020, 08:52:03 AM by johnb51 »
John

Mark in Texas

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Re: "Har's List of Supremely Delicious Mango Varieties"
« Reply #69 on: April 27, 2020, 09:16:21 AM »
:D Yah, it's gotten overboard. What I find humorous is that Bruce Ames (previous chair of biochem at Berkeley) proved that organic produce is higher in carcinogens than conventional back in the 80's.

That is funny!  ;D

Excellent, solid points you made. 

Mark in Texas

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Re: "Har's List of Supremely Delicious Mango Varieties"
« Reply #70 on: April 27, 2020, 09:26:07 AM »
I'd say anything that conserves soil and soil health, forests, aquifers, and ocean health is good ....

Of course.  It's the extreme wackos and their lawyering whores I have a problem with.

This membership is in the 1,000's and I bet there is not one person who has spent the money and time it takes putting in cover crops and legumes 2 years in a row.  I have, on 14 acres.   FWIW my aquifer's output is plentiful and my #1 pump/well is shallow set at 120'.  The well is capable of producing a whopping 150 gals/hr. if need be.

Elbon rye, cut it at 6' tall.



Hairy vetch is flowering now. That legume and the sweet clover I planted have been reseeding since 2004.
 


Grafted last year if all goes well will be eating Glenn, Orange Sherbet, Fruit Punch and Pineapple Pleasure in a few months.  My mangos are about golf size now   We recently had a low of 46F which has induced my Pinkerton avocado tree to bloom the second time this year.
« Last Edit: April 27, 2020, 09:29:37 AM by Mark in Texas »

johnb51

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Re: "Har's List of Supremely Delicious Mango Varieties"
« Reply #71 on: April 27, 2020, 02:16:55 PM »
That all sounds fantastic, Mark. And I respect you greatly for being a good steward of your land.
John

Mark in Texas

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Re: "Har's List of Supremely Delicious Mango Varieties"
« Reply #72 on: April 29, 2020, 07:50:51 AM »
That all sounds fantastic, Mark. And I respect you greatly for being a good steward of your land.

Thank you. Didn't come cheap either.  I hired a farmer to disc, sow, and then drag the tilled soil to cover the seed.   You can't get a farmer to unload a large tractor off the trailer for less than $500.



johnb51

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Re: "Har's List of Supremely Delicious Mango Varieties"
« Reply #73 on: April 29, 2020, 08:45:46 AM »
That all sounds fantastic, Mark. And I respect you greatly for being a good steward of your land.

Thank you. Didn't come cheap either.  I hired a farmer to disc, sow, and then drag the tilled soil to cover the seed.   You can't get a farmer to unload a large tractor off the trailer for less than $500.


From what I can see in this photo, your soil looks very fertile.  Is the feral pig problem in Texas as bad as I've read?
« Last Edit: April 29, 2020, 12:54:57 PM by johnb51 »
John

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Re: "Har's List of Supremely Delicious Mango Varieties"
« Reply #74 on: April 29, 2020, 04:36:34 PM »
I have to say, I like Har's Oddities list more than the Supremely Delicious list. Granted, I haven't tried all on both lists, but Pim Seng Mun and Coconut Cream are two of my top five (I've yet to try a great example of M-4, which could knock Coconut Cream off my list if it lives up to the hype). Has anyone ventured a "romantic" name for M-4? I also really like Madame Francis and Ice Cream and Baptiste.

 

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