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Author Topic: New ichang papeda  (Read 501 times)

Ghost

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New ichang papeda
« on: April 16, 2020, 12:11:39 PM »
Just got some last week, they look fine and healthy. The leaves look different though.[




Ghost

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Re: New ichang papeda
« Reply #1 on: April 16, 2020, 12:12:58 PM »



Citradia

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Re: New ichang papeda
« Reply #2 on: April 16, 2020, 07:46:39 PM »
Neat! Where did ya get your trees? Ichangensis is a hard one to find.

Ghost

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Re: New ichang papeda
« Reply #3 on: April 16, 2020, 08:30:08 PM »
Woodlanders is currently selling it. I'd recommend getting it before they close mail orders on April 30th.

SoCal2warm

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Re: New ichang papeda
« Reply #4 on: April 17, 2020, 02:00:07 PM »
an entry about Ichang papeda I was able to find from an old source:

some excerpts:

" This species is cultivated in the vicinity of Ichang, and it bears a very large lemonlike fruit that is of sufficiently good quality to cause it to be shipped to markets several hundred miles distant.
In China this species occurs in an undoubted wild state in the hills of the Upper Yangtze Valley from Ichang west and southwest in Hupeh, Szechwan, and Kwichow, growing at altitudes of 1,500 to 6,000 feet. In Assam a closely related but slightly different form is found at an altitude of 5,000 to 6,000 feet in the Khasi Hills.

The species thus ranges over a region at least 1,500 miles long and some 500 miles wide.

This plant is reported in all parts of its range as growing in a truly wild state and is cultivated on a small scale around Ichang along the Yangtze River, where the fruit is called the "Ichang lemon" by foreigners.

The typical Citrus ichangensis as it occurs in southwestern China is a small tree or a large shrub, usually 5 to 15 feet high (1.5 to 5 meters), but sometimes reaching 20 feet. It also occurs wild in fruiting condition only 2 to 3 feet high on the cliffs of the Yangtze Gorges. "

The article also makes mention to both a wild and cultivated form with slightly better fruit quality.

" Mr. E. H. Wilson informs the writer that the form of this species cultivated in the Ichang region yields an excellent fruit known to foreign residents of the Yangtze Vallet as the "Ichang lemon." These fruits are shipped down the river to Hankow and west well into Szechwan, and are so much esteemed as to command good prices.

So far as is now known, Citrus ichangensis is native farther north than any other evergreen species of Citrus, only the deciduous Citrus trifoliata having a more northerly range. Besides having the northernmost range of any known evergreen species of Citrus it occurs at the highest altitudes reported for any wild species of the genus. In the Hsingshan District, in latitude 31° 10', Mr. Wilson collected this plant at an altitude of 4,200 feet, and Pére Cavalerie found it in central Kweichow at a height of 5,577 feet. "

Journal of Agricultural Research, Department of Agriculture, Volume 1, Washington D.C., October 10, 1913
Citrus ichangensis, A promising, hardy, new species from Southwestern China and Assam, article by Walter T. Swingle

(Note who wrote the article, this is the same man after whom the "Swingle citrumelo" was named)

Citradia

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Re: New ichang papeda
« Reply #5 on: April 17, 2020, 07:32:26 PM »
Note that Ichang papeda is different than Ichang lemon. I’ve seen debates here about Ichang lemon being progeny or not of ichangensis/ Ichang papeda. I know they are different because I grow both. I would believe that Ichang lemon is a cross with ichangensis and pummelo as indicated in Tom McClendon’s book, “Hardy Citrus for the Southeast.” 

SoCal2warm

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Re: New ichang papeda
« Reply #6 on: April 17, 2020, 10:51:15 PM »
Note that Ichang papeda is different than Ichang lemon.
Yes, it can sometimes get a little confusing. Sometimes Ichang papeda used to, and still is, referred to as a "lemon", or "Ichang lemon", but Ichang papeda is the one with very distinct symmetrical shaped leaves, whereas Ichang lemon has much more ordinary leaves that look like the leaves on a pomelo or grapefruit.
(Due to the nature of the Chinese language, they did not have a very discriminating method to refer to these different citrus types. In China, Ichang papeda was called "Yichang orange", and Ichang lemon was referred to as "fragrant ball", which is also the same name they use for citron)

The leaves of Ichang papeda look very similar to the leaves of Kaffir lime. However, the leaves on very small Kaffir lime seedlings look pretty ordinary and do not really start taking on the characteristic symmetrical shape until the plant gets a little bigger.

I've tasted the leaves of Ichang papeda and they taste very much like the leaves of citron (specifically citron, not lemon leaves) except with a much lower level of lemony aroma, and also with a little bit of a strange sort of feeling of almost pungent "deepness" to the smell. The leaves are very close to, but not quite as tender as citron or Kaffir lime leaves (so I would say worse "eating quality", if anyone was curious).
I might be overemphasizing details that are not important here, but here it is, in case anyone wanted to know.

Also to mention, both Ichang papeda and Changsha mandarin root very easily from cuttings, much easier than other citrus.
« Last Edit: April 17, 2020, 11:23:06 PM by SoCal2warm »

lavender87

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Re: New ichang papeda
« Reply #7 on: June 13, 2020, 10:47:51 PM »
Just got some last week, they look fine and healthy. The leaves look different though.[




  The one in pictures is not Ichang Papeda. The tip of an Ichang Papeda leaf would be pointy instead of round tip like the one in your pictures. I added a picture of my Ichang Padepa tree for reference.

« Last Edit: June 14, 2020, 01:09:04 PM by lavender87 »

lavender87

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Re: New ichang papeda
« Reply #8 on: June 13, 2020, 11:07:46 PM »

The leaves of Ichang papeda look very similar to the leaves of Kaffir lime. However, the leaves on very small Kaffir lime seedlings look pretty ordinary and do not really start taking on the characteristic symmetrical shape until the plant gets a little bigger.

I've tasted the leaves of Ichang papeda and they taste very much like the leaves of citron (specifically citron, not lemon leaves) except with a much lower level of lemony aroma, and also with a little bit of a strange sort of feeling of almost pungent "deepness" to the smell. The leaves are very close to, but not quite as tender as citron or Kaffir lime leaves (so I would say worse "eating quality", if anyone was curious).



  Kaffir lime leaves have rounded tip while ichange papeda leaves have pointy tip.

  Ichang papeda leaves taste blandly with very little citrus flavor. Its citrus smell in leaves is as weak as citrus smell in trifoliata leaves.

 

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