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Author Topic: Frogs and toads : Are they efficient to control fruit flies in a garden?  (Read 467 times)

shinzo

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Hi all. I noticed two frogs in my garden the other day, and i was wondering whether frogs can be a solution to combat fruit flies (i saw in the net that frog breeders feed fruit flies to their frogs but i don't know if it is relevant in case of combating a fruit fly at the scale of a garden). I have 3 guava trees and i had problems of fruit flies in my guavas the past two years. If this can be a solution, i will try to attract more frogs in the garden.
Apperently a frog can eat 100 insects / night, 10000 / season. I t can be intersting if the fruit flies are reachable to it in the ground.
« Last Edit: April 21, 2020, 01:40:18 PM by shinzo »

echinopora

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The thousands of cane toads in my yard seem to have little effect. However the cane toads also reduce native frog numbers, many of which are small tree frogs. One thing I wish I could have more of are dragonflies.
Rob

Garden_Harley_FL

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How do the fruit flies affect your guavas? I have alot of fruit flies around my sugar apple plants due to huge crater sized 6 ft compost ditches which I dump fruits and veggies in. I noticed the fruit flies at night sleep on some of the sugar apple leaves but during the day are in the pit.

I notice them around the baby sugar apple fruits and rotting sugar apple flowers (it smells like a fruit to them) but they seem so far to do no harm to the baby sugar apple fruits.

Do fruit flies eat your guavas? Have they eaten the leaves or the guava skin?

Thanks :)
Harley
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Garden_Harley_FL

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By the way, I have many frogs that hang around the compost ditches at night and see them eating to their content. But the compost ditch is very wide and I have multiple so there are many fruit flies -- too many for the frog to eat.
Harley
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I heart Annonaceae

shinzo

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Thank you for your comments.
@Garden_Harley_FL : By problems i mean my guava fruits are infested by fruit fly larvae. That is why i was hoping that frogs can eat the first generations of fruits flies before the fruit set.

Tommyng

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You have to bag those fruits or just net the whole tree to combat the fruit flies. There are also sprays  you can use, but bagging or netting usually gets it done.
Donít rush, take time and enjoy life and food.

pineislander

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You have to bag those fruits or just net the whole tree to combat the fruit flies. There are also sprays  you can use, but bagging or netting usually gets it done.
I couldn't sell guava without bagging them. Once you have the bags the work only takes a few seconds for each fruit,
What you are looking for is called organzaa in English, with a drawstring. Machine wash before reusing.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B073PZH96D/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o02_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

shinzo

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Thank you for the answers.  I ll look for this kind of bags. The appropriate size for guavas is 6x9 inches?

Odenwald

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Always use larger bags rather than smaller ones, but yes that size will work on most guavas.   Kilo is larger and may need a bigger size.

pineislander

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Thank you for the answers.  I ll look for this kind of bags. The appropriate size for guavas is 6x9 inches?
Yes that size was very good even for large fruit of the pink soft type. White crisp guava well grown may be too large.
Be aware guava can set two fruit in a cluster fashion. Reduce down to one fruit/bag if you bag two fruit in one of these bags you may not be able to remove the fruit through the opening. I found it best to install the bags when fruit is halfway grown. Putting the bag on very early seemed to contribute to fruit drop.

 

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