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Author Topic: Wax Jambu Challenge- Arizona  (Read 1104 times)

Shorebound

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Wax Jambu Challenge- Arizona
« on: May 05, 2020, 04:01:45 PM »
I came across this forum whilst trying to find anyone with advice on growing wax jambu in Northwest Phoenix area (9b). I plan to keep it in a smart pot on my south-facing patio and I'm prepared to bring it indoors for when it gets too cold. I have almost no experience with tropical trees. Would this be something that requires a sort of custom greenhouse with a mister to keep it humid? I am told they don't grow here, but I've never been one to listen to someone tell me I can't do something. 😁
« Last Edit: May 11, 2020, 04:37:53 PM by Shorebound »

sjtropical

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Re: Wax Jambu Challenge- Arizona
« Reply #1 on: May 06, 2020, 01:45:45 AM »
Where I live the temp can dips down to 32 degrees.  Wax Jambu will get damage below 42 degrees and die. I killed two I planted outside in the ground a few years ago.  Wax jambu loves full sunshine and lots of water. Fertilize it when the weather get hot. If you donít have a greenhouse, you can keep in the garage or inside the house until the weather get better.  Wax Jambu will grow very quick. You donít need to keep it humid but if the your weather has dry hot wind blowing then misting once a while can prevent leaves from drying up. Fruits can sweeten when exposed to lots sunshine.  Good luck.

CGameProgrammer

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Re: Wax Jambu Challenge- Arizona
« Reply #2 on: May 06, 2020, 02:17:02 PM »
I grow it in San Diego outside with little care, just water and very occasional fertilizer. They've seen temperatures in the high 30s briefly at night and were fine. They don't need humidity, nor do they need a ton of direct sunshine (a tree on the north side of my house, half in bright shade, produces fruit that are plenty sweet). But in Arizona you will likely need to protect them during winter nights.

stuartdaly88

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Re: Wax Jambu Challenge- Arizona
« Reply #3 on: May 07, 2020, 03:38:40 AM »
My plant has easily survived some frost. The worst I've had is defoliation.
Patience is bitter, but its fruit is sweet.
-Jean-Jacques Rousseau

quesofreshcoh

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Re: Wax Jambu Challenge- Arizona
« Reply #4 on: May 07, 2020, 01:33:03 PM »
I'm in Central Florida and we usually get down to the 40s in the winter. This last winter has luckily been mild so we only had a few days that low, and my Wax Jambu had no issues at all. It is the variety "Stinark Red #5" and is the only variety that will grow well in this climate. Mine is only 3 feet tall and it's already producing less than a year after I got it. I hope the fruits taste good! Good luck with yours, growing it in pots my eventually be hard because they do need room to grow. Watch Seamus O Leary and Jake Mace's videos on how to protect tropicals from frost, it's very helpful!

Shorebound

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Re: Wax Jambu Challenge- Arizona
« Reply #5 on: May 11, 2020, 04:33:22 PM »
Where I live the temp can dips down to 32 degrees.  Wax Jambu will get damage below 42 degrees and die. I killed two I planted outside in the ground a few years ago.  Wax jambu loves full sunshine and lots of water. Fertilize it when the weather get hot. If you donít have a greenhouse, you can keep in the garage or inside the house until the weather get better.  Wax Jambu will grow very quick. You donít need to keep it humid but if the your weather has dry hot wind blowing then misting once a while can prevent leaves from drying up. Fruits can sweeten when exposed to lots sunshine.  Good luck.
thank you so much! Sometimes it does get pretty cold here and I know I'll need to bring it inside for that. I was more concerned about the dry air but now you gave me another reason to put a mister on my patio!

Shorebound

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Re: Wax Jambu Challenge- Arizona
« Reply #6 on: May 11, 2020, 04:35:21 PM »
I grow it in San Diego outside with little care, just water and very occasional fertilizer. They've seen temperatures in the high 30s briefly at night and were fine. They don't need humidity, nor do they need a ton of direct sunshine (a tree on the north side of my house, half in bright shade, produces fruit that are plenty sweet). But in Arizona you will likely need to protect them during winter nights.
are they messy trees? The north side of my house is also fairly well protected from the sun. Not sure I want a fruit tree in the front yard though.

Shorebound

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Re: Wax Jambu Challenge- Arizona
« Reply #7 on: May 11, 2020, 04:36:59 PM »
I'm in Central Florida and we usually get down to the 40s in the winter. This last winter has luckily been mild so we only had a few days that low, and my Wax Jambu had no issues at all. It is the variety "Stinark Red #5" and is the only variety that will grow well in this climate. Mine is only 3 feet tall and it's already producing less than a year after I got it. I hope the fruits taste good! Good luck with yours, growing it in pots my eventually be hard because they do need room to grow. Watch Seamus O Leary and Jake Mace's videos on how to protect tropicals from frost, it's very helpful!
thank you! Maybe if it's doing very well in the pot (I'm considering using smart pots) I can plant it next to my Edgar mango.

Shorebound

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Re: Wax Jambu Challenge- Arizona
« Reply #8 on: May 14, 2020, 09:43:49 PM »
Okay so the tree was received the other day and I planted it in a citrus mix. It's in a 2-gallon pot and it came in a 1 gallon pot. overall I think it looks okay but I've noticed that the ends of a couple of west facing leaves have completely dried out.  Is this something to be concerned about or is it part of the getting settled process?


SeaWalnut

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Re: Wax Jambu Challenge- Arizona
« Reply #9 on: May 15, 2020, 11:14:47 AM »
Why did you planted it in citrus mix?
From what ive read these like slightly alkaline and sodic soil.
Sodic soil has 8,5 or more ph and i potted my Syzigium Samaragense in regular garden dirt.

Shorebound

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Re: Wax Jambu Challenge- Arizona
« Reply #10 on: May 15, 2020, 11:22:20 AM »
I planted it in citrus mix so it would drain better. Do you think the soil is causing the leaf tips to look like this?

Jaboticaba45

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Re: Wax Jambu Challenge- Arizona
« Reply #11 on: May 15, 2020, 11:25:09 AM »
I would just let it be. Put it under a shade cloth for a week or so and it should recover from shipping stress.
Ryan

Shorebound

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Re: Wax Jambu Challenge- Arizona
« Reply #12 on: May 15, 2020, 12:03:14 PM »
Thanks. Where do you guys get your shade cloth?

Seanny

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Re: Wax Jambu Challenge- Arizona
« Reply #13 on: May 15, 2020, 12:12:25 PM »
I had 2 pots of a big red variety. Died over winter.
My 4 other varieties can over winter here.

They grow fast in summer so that 2G pot is a bit small.

Shorebound

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Re: Wax Jambu Challenge- Arizona
« Reply #14 on: May 15, 2020, 12:20:05 PM »
I was thinking of getting a smart pot but couldn't find one before it arrived-
Just happened to have this 2 gallon on hand.
I hesitate to plant it in the ground due to winter worries. You think it's possible to plant and mitigate with heat lamp etc?

Jaboticaba45

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Re: Wax Jambu Challenge- Arizona
« Reply #15 on: May 15, 2020, 12:21:23 PM »
Thanks. Where do you guys get your shade cloth?

I just used weed tarp
Ryan

Shorebound

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Re: Wax Jambu Challenge- Arizona
« Reply #16 on: May 22, 2020, 01:27:16 PM »
I decided to put it into the ground yesterday and while doing so noticed some new leaves coming from some of the lower branches. Happy day. ;)

what made me choose to plant it was the fact that the container did not seem to be holding moisture very well and I hadn't noticed any new growth despite keeping it in a somewhat shaded area.
This weekend I will be putting up 50% shade cloth to protect it and my Edgar mango.

AndrewAZ

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Re: Wax Jambu Challenge- Arizona
« Reply #17 on: May 23, 2020, 02:21:30 AM »
I gave 2 planted in scottsdale.  Small plants.  One has gone through 2 winters, one through last unprotected.  They are a bit shaded and have not grown much, but both are healthy.

shpaz

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Re: Wax Jambu Challenge- Arizona
« Reply #18 on: May 23, 2020, 10:42:41 AM »
Mine was fine in a pot when it got down to 34F (1c). I put it in ground last Feb with shade cloth on all side but not top, and it is doing fine. Our 8.5+ ph soil however is causing iron deficiency.

Shorebound

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Re: Wax Jambu Challenge- Arizona
« Reply #19 on: May 27, 2020, 01:01:30 PM »
Andrew, are they producing fruit?


I gave 2 planted in scottsdale.  Small plants.  One has gone through 2 winters, one through last unprotected.  They are a bit shaded and have not grown much, but both are healthy.

Shorebound

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Re: Wax Jambu Challenge- Arizona
« Reply #20 on: May 27, 2020, 01:02:25 PM »
Are you able to amend with ironite?

Mine was fine in a pot when it got down to 34F (1c). I put it in ground last Feb with shade cloth on all side but not top, and it is doing fine. Our 8.5+ ph soil however is causing iron deficiency.

AndrewAZ

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Re: Wax Jambu Challenge- Arizona
« Reply #21 on: May 28, 2020, 12:43:11 AM »
Mine are small and growing at a slow pace.  Maybe a few years before fruit.

shpaz

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Re: Wax Jambu Challenge- Arizona
« Reply #22 on: May 29, 2020, 01:21:16 AM »
Are you able to amend with ironite?

Mine was fine in a pot when it got down to 34F (1c). I put it in ground last Feb with shade cloth on all side but not top, and it is doing fine. Our 8.5+ ph soil however is causing iron deficiency.

I have sprayed chelated iron on the leaves, added 15g of sulfur and 30g of humic acid and 1.5g of micro elements around the plant. I will check on it again this week.

SeaWalnut

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Re: Wax Jambu Challenge- Arizona
« Reply #23 on: May 29, 2020, 04:46:43 AM »
On wikipedia it says ,,when healthy ,the leaves have a shine to them,, .
This is how the leaves of my wax jambu look.They have what appears to be shiny specks on them with more on the trunk and on the new growth.
Tree grows in sodic soil,verry alkaline( i mean it has 8,5 ph).
« Last Edit: May 29, 2020, 04:49:38 AM by SeaWalnut »

nattyfroootz

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Re: Wax Jambu Challenge- Arizona
« Reply #24 on: May 29, 2020, 11:35:39 AM »
That tree is not a Myrtaceae, SeaWalnut.

Myrtaceae have opposite leaf arrangement and that is alternate.

 

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