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Author Topic: how to prune  (Read 715 times)

jlohr

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how to prune
« on: May 06, 2020, 09:42:35 PM »
2 year old pink pomelo.  Any suggestions on how should I prune this tree? 



Oolie

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Re: how to prune
« Reply #1 on: May 07, 2020, 03:40:51 AM »
https://crfg.org/wp-content/uploads/CITRUS-PRUNING-Presentation.pdf

Now is the time, the tree is still young and will respond well to shaping.

Millet

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Re: how to prune
« Reply #2 on: May 07, 2020, 11:44:34 AM »
Citrus tree growth is upright in most varieties. During the first years, there is no need to prune, since research has shown that any cut to a young tree reduces root growth.  This is due to the equilibrium between foliage and root system.  A citrus tree is a biological unit.  Heavy cuts on a young tree discourages canopy growth and delays the tree to  come into bearing.  After a few years, depending on the speed of the growth a selective canopy THINNING may be carried out.  The choice of branches to eliminate is based on the concept that any space within the canopy must be covered by only ONE branch. It is not wise to let surplus branches occupy the same aerial space. It is important that thinning does not deplete any canopy sector. A harmonious citrus tree grows to an almost round shape.  Vegetation free canopy spaces must be avoided since they reduce yield.  In citrus areas such as the United States, Brazil, etc. pruning is either practiced rarely or not at all.  Unpruned trees come into bearing quickly and yield crops for many years. After many years of growth crops are reduced and fruits become smaller.  This is the time to make heavy cuts and renew growth. 
« Last Edit: May 07, 2020, 01:24:50 PM by Millet »

kumin

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Re: how to prune
« Reply #3 on: May 07, 2020, 06:23:07 PM »
Millet, I like your concept: every canopy space needs a branch, every branch needs it's own canopy space. It's a good part of pruning concept, another is to train and maintain good limb structural framework. Once understood, many of these horticultural concepts are quite simple.

Yorgos

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Re: how to prune
« Reply #4 on: May 08, 2020, 03:16:34 PM »
Citrus tree growth is upright in most varieties. During the first years, there is no need to prune, since research has shown that any cut to a young tree reduces root growth.  This is due to the equilibrium between foliage and root system.  A citrus tree is a biological unit.  Heavy cuts on a young tree discourages canopy growth and delays the tree to  come into bearing.  After a few years, depending on the speed of the growth a selective canopy THINNING may be carried out.  The choice of branches to eliminate is based on the concept that any space within the canopy must be covered by only ONE branch. It is not wise to let surplus branches occupy the same aerial space. It is important that thinning does not deplete any canopy sector. A harmonious citrus tree grows to an almost round shape.  Vegetation free canopy spaces must be avoided since they reduce yield.  In citrus areas such as the United States, Brazil, etc. pruning is either practiced rarely or not at all.  Unpruned trees come into bearing quickly and yield crops for many years. After many years of growth crops are reduced and fruits become smaller.  This is the time to make heavy cuts and renew growth.
I have a 20+ year old in ground meiwa kumquat that had become quite empty in the center. Since the tree has become too wide for its spot, I pruned some top branches in order to get more light into the center of the tree hoping it would cause new growth closer in the main trunk.  That has been slow but seems to be coming along.  Once that takes hold I will prune the side branches (this fall) that are pretty leggy so as these send out new growth I will have a nice full canopy that is closer to the trunk.
Near NRG Stadium, Houston Texas. USDA zone 9a

jlohr

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Re: how to prune
« Reply #5 on: May 17, 2020, 01:28:25 PM »
Thanks Millet and Oolie for the pointers.  I like the idea of no pruning at all on a young tree and will let it do its thing. 

 

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