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Author Topic: Question about grafting kumquat branches or buds to new citron tree  (Read 349 times)

surftrunks

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Hi, I just bought a citron tree and want to try grafting some kumquat buds grafts or cleft grafts to see if I can have a layer of kumquat's below the higher up citrons. See the pictures attached of the tree I just bought. There are two small branches starting around the area where I would want the kumquat branches. Are these small spouting branches from the citron trunk or from the root stock? Can i try cleft grafting to these small branches or should I cut them off and try placing bud grafts on the trunk?
Thank you







Oolie

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It's not clear from the picture, either it was budded at the point where the trunk shoots sideways, or it's grafted above that at the bark scar. It could be an interstock even given the oddity.

Either way, I don't cleft growth before it hardens off, I do bud though, and will look for a spot where the wood is flat and the bark slips, that way I get good cambium contact.

Bomand

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I would wait until growth and conditions were right and cleft graft. I find that buds are hard to force when there is a lot of growth above the bud that you install. Remember too the growth habits of buds...make sure this is what you desire. Cleft grafting also does not have the restrictions (timing) that budding does. Good luck with your project.

poncirsguy

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I forced my Fukushu bud oc C35 by placing light on that bud after sunset for an additional 4 hours.  It started growing in about a week and continued at about an inch or 2 a week.  I left the root stock tree for about 4 months before removing it.  It is 3.5 years old now.  Fukushu kumquat below in 25 gallon container.

« Last Edit: May 15, 2020, 08:34:32 AM by poncirsguy »

surftrunks

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Thanks for everyone's advice.  I'm new to all this.  What exactly is meant by "bark slipping " ? Is there a way to tell this without cutting into the bark?

kumin

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"Bark slipping" is the part of the growth cycle when the bark and underlying wood are saturated with sap. At this point cutting into the bark and gently pushing sideways will cause the bark to come free from the wood. It is at this point that budding and bark grafting become possible.

A safe spot can be tested to minimize damage in the event that the bark won't slip properly

surftrunks

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quick update.  I grafted some satsuma mandarin and kumquat grafts to the Citron tree.  I think it went surprisingly smoothly. I guess now I just wait 3 or 4 weeks and hope the grafts take.



mrtexas

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Re: Question about grafting kumquat branches or buds to new citron tree
« Reply #7 on: June 03, 2020, 07:09:15 PM »
Buds may not grow if not at the top of the tree. You may get lucky
but I don't depend on luck. I graft buds on the top of the tree.
Good luck if you tee budded kumquat. That has never worked for me.
Have had success with chip buds and cleft with kumquats.

 

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