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Author Topic: My first taste of Bael Fruit (Aegle marmelos)  (Read 6784 times)

red durian

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My first taste of Bael Fruit (Aegle marmelos)
« on: January 14, 2013, 06:07:03 AM »
The botanical name is spot on.  A syrup from the fruit flesh looks and smells like marmalade.  Upon tasting it, it is like unsweetened marmalade, though.   :'(



I found a tea recipe for the fruit, but mine was too mature to slice and dry and toast so I simply added sugar and a touch of salt.




Then a few minutes later to absorb the sugar and release some more liquid:




The final result is a really delicious strong-tasting marmalade (full of seeds) that has a bit of spruce resin flavour in the background.  I will eat mine a spoonful each day for the medicinal benefit, since I can't think of a way to remove the seeds to use it as marmalade without boiling it (which I think would ruin the flavour somewhat)

FlyingFoxFruits

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Re: My first taste of Bael Fruit (Aegle marmelos)
« Reply #1 on: January 14, 2013, 08:43:35 AM »
nice pics!  thanks for posting them.
I hope you get to taste many more, there's some superior strains out there I hear.

tabbydan

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Re: My first taste of Bael Fruit (Aegle marmelos)
« Reply #2 on: January 14, 2013, 05:36:07 PM »
The flavor profile is different between the ripe and immature fruits.

The immature ones are considerably more sour, but also have more distinct floral/fruity flavors.  Odors and flavors like passiflora, papaya, and other things come to mind.

When it is fully ripe it becomes sweeter, more mellow, and less complex seeming.

It can also be sliced ripe and dried out.  That form is often used for teas.

Feronia limonia is similar (immature fruits are more sour and have a stronger fruity/floral flavors), both are oddball citrus relatives with hard shells that probably deserve quite a bit more attention.

Supposedly "bael" fruits are often grown at Shiva temples.

What's that got to do with Jose Andres $10 brussel sprouts?

HMHausman

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Re: My first taste of Bael Fruit (Aegle marmelos)
« Reply #3 on: January 14, 2013, 05:43:15 PM »
I hope they have some serious medicinal value......because for me at least, their visual appeal is limited.....and that's being nice.

Harry
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tabbydan

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Re: My first taste of Bael Fruit (Aegle marmelos)
« Reply #4 on: January 14, 2013, 06:22:12 PM »
I hope they have some serious medicinal value......because for me at least, their visual appeal is limited.....and that's being nice.

Ever have a "black sapote"?  Its ripening process is a LOT more repulsive...

Even in the stage show in the pictures the smell is still nice and sweet.  You could go for an immature fruit (which has beige flesh) if you can't take something that looks rotten.

They do have "medicinal value" but I suspect that their medicinal properties are a bit over-hyped.

Ripe or unripe you can stir one into a glass of water, add sugar to taste, and have a pleasant drink
What's that got to do with Jose Andres $10 brussel sprouts?

HMHausman

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Re: My first taste of Bael Fruit (Aegle marmelos)
« Reply #5 on: January 14, 2013, 07:22:04 PM »
I hope they have some serious medicinal value......because for me at least, their visual appeal is limited.....and that's being nice.
Ever have a "black sapote"?  Its ripening process is a LOT more repulsive...

Actually....I have had many black sapotes.  I would have to respectfully disagree about the relative repulsiveness of the ripening process.  Of course, beauty and its converse are in the eye of the beholder.  I'm just not a fan of the ripening process I see here.  I'll take a black sapote any day. This fruit looks to me like a larval hatching ground for some type of beetle......or am I being a bit over dramatic here? Possibly so.
Harry
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FloridaGreenMan

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Re: My first taste of Bael Fruit (Aegle marmelos)
« Reply #6 on: January 14, 2013, 07:51:59 PM »
Here's the Baelfruit from the Fruit & Spice Pk. Looks much better than the one shown. This one was actually sweet and although not really tasty, it was OK
 

FloridaGreenMan

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Re: My first taste of Bael Fruit (Aegle marmelos)
« Reply #7 on: January 14, 2013, 07:59:57 PM »
I hope they have some serious medicinal value......because for me at least, their visual appeal is limited.....and that's being nice.
Ever have a "black sapote"?  Its ripening process is a LOT more repulsive...

Actually....I have had many black sapotes.  I would have to respectfully disagree about the relative repulsiveness of the ripening process.  Of course, beauty and its converse are in the eye of the beholder.  I'm just not a fan of the ripening process I see here.  I'll take a black sapote any day. This fruit looks to me like a larval hatching ground for some type of beetle......or am I being a bit over dramatic here? Possibly so.
gonna have to agree with Harry here.  While the Black Sapote is not my favorite, it it LOOKS as if it is rotten to the point of being garbage when ready to eat, it looks far more appealing than the seeded mess Bael fruit posted by Red Durian.  Noel's looks better but it still does not sound appealing whatsoever.
- Rob

red durian

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Re: My first taste of Bael Fruit (Aegle marmelos)
« Reply #8 on: January 14, 2013, 08:06:30 PM »
Here's the Baelfruit from the Fruit & Spice Pk. Looks much better than the one shown. This one was actually sweet and although not really tasty, it was OK
 


Cool!  I was going to ask if it is possible that they could be sweet.  All mine needed was some sweetness. 

red durian

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Re: My first taste of Bael Fruit (Aegle marmelos)
« Reply #9 on: January 14, 2013, 08:13:28 PM »

 This fruit looks to me like a larval hatching ground for some type of beetle......or am I being a bit over dramatic here? Possibly so.

That is terribly funny, but I can see what you mean.  Recently, I asked a farming group on facebook if they were interested in buying durian seeds and the only responses I got were that no one likes durian, it's illegal to take into public, and such.  I think a lot of this damage to durian's distribution came from early clever and colourful descriptions of its smell.  Your description has this same catchy appeal.  I know I won't be able to resist repeating it (while trying to sell bael fruit trees).

red durian

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Re: My first taste of Bael Fruit (Aegle marmelos)
« Reply #10 on: January 15, 2013, 07:20:56 AM »
So, I tried a juice from my seedy marmalade this evening.


It tastes like what juice from marmalade would taste like, requiring more sugar.  I like it.

This form ought to deal with the un-attractive (to some) appearance of the opened fruit.  Now, it just looks like iced tea.

fruitlovers

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Re: My first taste of Bael Fruit (Aegle marmelos)
« Reply #11 on: January 15, 2013, 09:56:38 AM »
I hope they have some serious medicinal value......because for me at least, their visual appeal is limited.....and that's being nice.
Ever have a "black sapote"?  Its ripening process is a LOT more repulsive...

Actually....I have had many black sapotes.  I would have to respectfully disagree about the relative repulsiveness of the ripening process.  Of course, beauty and its converse are in the eye of the beholder.  I'm just not a fan of the ripening process I see here.  I'll take a black sapote any day. This fruit looks to me like a larval hatching ground for some type of beetle......or am I being a bit over dramatic here? Possibly so.

Yes totally over dramatic, especially if you've never had the fruit. Really there is nothing repulsive about it. But it is a messy fruit. The inner liquid is about the viscosity of honey, so very messy and sticky. It can be a good fruit. But medicinally it is excellent, especially for stomach ailments. No it's not over hyped. Been used in India for thousands of years. BTW i noticed big differences in shape, size, and quality of bael fruits in India vs. the ones in Thailand.
Oscar

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Re: My first taste of Bael Fruit (Aegle marmelos)
« Reply #12 on: January 15, 2013, 11:03:32 AM »
Bael is a popular fruit in Northern & Eastern India.Some are quite big and tasty.The pulp is used in treating constipation.The entire plant is useful.

tabbydan

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Re: My first taste of Bael Fruit (Aegle marmelos)
« Reply #13 on: January 15, 2013, 04:58:32 PM »
People can be repulsed by fully ripe Bael if they want to, but I didn't bat an eyelash the first time I had a fully ripe one.  Other people who saw me consume the fruit didn't seem repulsed either.

I do enjoy black sapote (don't get me wrong) but I did have work hard to overcome my instincts and eat the first one.  Something that goes from green and firm to brown-purple-black and sagging under its own weight.... sort of screams out "I'm rotten don't eat me".

It's best to try Bael both ways, both fully ripe and immature... since the flavor does change quite a bit.  I like both but I think immature is even better (albeit more sour).

I'm not going to say Bael is the best fruit I ever had, but at the same time I have to say it is rather enjoyable and I could probably eat one a week (if I had the opportunity).  I think it should be more widely cultivated and consumed.
What's that got to do with Jose Andres $10 brussel sprouts?

NathanC

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Re: My first taste of Bael Fruit (Aegle marmelos)
« Reply #14 on: April 19, 2014, 02:42:57 PM »
If anyone is still following this topic, then may I have same seeds? My climate is perfect for this plant, as they require a long dry season. You can reply to me anytime.

snhabegger

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Re: My first taste of Bael Fruit (Aegle marmelos)
« Reply #15 on: April 19, 2014, 06:58:58 PM »
I hope they have some serious medicinal value......because for me at least, their visual appeal is limited.....and that's being nice.
Ever have a "black sapote"?  Its ripening process is a LOT more repulsive...

Actually....I have had many black sapotes.  I would have to respectfully disagree about the relative repulsiveness of the ripening process.  Of course, beauty and its converse are in the eye of the beholder.  I'm just not a fan of the ripening process I see here.  I'll take a black sapote any day. This fruit looks to me like a larval hatching ground for some type of beetle......or am I being a bit over dramatic here? Possibly so.

Yes totally over dramatic, especially if you've never had the fruit. Really there is nothing repulsive about it. But it is a messy fruit. The inner liquid is about the viscosity of honey, so very messy and sticky. It can be a good fruit. But medicinally it is excellent, especially for stomach ailments. No it's not over hyped. Been used in India for thousands of years. BTW i noticed big differences in shape, size, and quality of bael fruits in India vs. the ones in Thailand.

I assume you mean that the Thai ones suck . . .  I've never seen anyone eat it for pleasure, but they do like to cut it into slices and boil it into a fluid that they take for colds or fever or gut troubles, or maybe anything they feel like.  My wife just said you can eat its leaves in meat salads, for what that's worth. 
« Last Edit: April 19, 2014, 07:15:24 PM by snhabegger »

bangkok

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Re: My first taste of Bael Fruit (Aegle marmelos)
« Reply #16 on: April 19, 2014, 07:10:44 PM »
One day i saw a bottle of baeljuice and bought it, it was drinkable but i won't buy that again.

 

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