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Author Topic: what to do  (Read 516 times)

clannewton

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what to do
« on: May 19, 2020, 06:24:08 PM »




Had some wind with the rainstorm last night and it ended up ripping off a branch that was heavy laden with fruit on my Ugly Betty mango tree. I collected all of the unripe fruit and was hoping to at least try and pickle them. Any pickling recipes or procedures would be appreciated.  :'(

Orkine

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Re: what to do
« Reply #1 on: May 19, 2020, 07:58:00 PM »
Sorry bro, know almost how you feel.
I lost a K3 branch with about 8 almost tennis ball size fruits.  ... and I didn't even have that much wind.
Took them and a couple of scions to graft on to other trees.

roblack

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Re: what to do
« Reply #2 on: May 19, 2020, 10:39:01 PM »
Central American technique: Break off the stems. Soak them in salted water for 1-2 days. That softens up the skin. Rinse out the water every 12-24 hours. Don’t be shy with the salt. After that, cut them up into slices. The seed and membrane around the seed should be removed (cut the mangos in half and the seed pops out, then pick apart the membrane). After that, you can soak them in lemon/lime juice, salt and chili powder. 


Indian technique: Cut the soaked mangoes into -1-2 inch cubes, remove the seeds, then fry them in hot oil along with fennel seeds, onion seeds, garlic, ginger, chili, a bunch of salt, turmeric and black pepper. Add the hot ingredients immediately to a glass pickling jar once the mango becomes soft. Top off with some vinegar, seal and leave out in the sun— Indian mango pickle! You can also add curry leaves and moringa leaves to the frying oil.

Oolie

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Re: what to do
« Reply #3 on: May 20, 2020, 12:52:56 AM »
How spicy do you like them?

zands

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Re: what to do
« Reply #4 on: May 20, 2020, 07:16:52 AM »
@roblack

On your Indian technique I would not cook the mango cubes until soft. I am sure they will rot. I would cook them until the point where they have gotten hot but are still firm. If you/anyone like to consume pro-biotic capsules..... You can drop one in any pickling or kraut you are making and get a better mix of bacteria in your final result.

A really easy and quick pickle to make is with Chinese cabbage aka Napa cabbage. Do not cut it up in small pieces. Instead cut up as best you can into 2" x 2" squares. Sprinkle the right amount of salt on them. Go on line to see what this is. No vinegar needed. Add the contents of one or two probiotic capsules.  You can add a bit of cayenne pepper if you like. Edible in 5 days but let it ferment for 10 to get a higher bacteria count.

For local fans of kimchi. There is a Korean owned Asian grocery store that makes theirs in-house. It is not very hot/spicy. They make it just right. In other Asian stores I see kimchi made in California.

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« Last Edit: May 20, 2020, 07:19:03 AM by zands »

clannewton

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Re: what to do
« Reply #5 on: May 20, 2020, 10:16:53 AM »
Central American technique: Break off the stems. Soak them in salted water for 1-2 days. That softens up the skin. Rinse out the water every 12-24 hours. Don’t be shy with the salt. After that, cut them up into slices. The seed and membrane around the seed should be removed (cut the mangos in half and the seed pops out, then pick apart the membrane). After that, you can soak them in lemon/lime juice, salt and chili powder. 


Indian technique: Cut the soaked mangoes into -1-2 inch cubes, remove the seeds, then fry them in hot oil along with fennel seeds, onion seeds, garlic, ginger, chili, a bunch of salt, turmeric and black pepper. Add the hot ingredients immediately to a glass pickling jar once the mango becomes soft. Top off with some vinegar, seal and leave out in the sun— Indian mango pickle! You can also add curry leaves and moringa leaves to the frying oil.

Awesome! Thank you!

clannewton

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Re: what to do
« Reply #6 on: May 20, 2020, 10:19:45 AM »
How spicy do you like them?

If it gets to spicy, I get the hiccups. Even though I like the taste, I guess my body won't let me indulge.  So probably some but not to much spice.

Oolie

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Re: what to do
« Reply #7 on: May 20, 2020, 06:11:08 PM »
It's more of a seasoning for Kerala cuisine, you use it as a topping for bland things like rice where there is not enough salt/spice. I will see if I can get the recipe for you.

johnnyv

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Re: what to do
« Reply #8 on: May 20, 2020, 08:39:39 PM »
https://www.thaicookbook.tv/thai-recipes/salads/green-mango-salad-with-fresh-shrimp/index.php
You don't have to add much chilli and it would still be tasty.
I don't know how Ugly Betty compares to Nam Dok Mai, but Thai green mango salad taste very nice.

 

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