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Author Topic: You can now grow the exact same Hass variety sold in Publix even in Miami!!!  (Read 716 times)

weiss613

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I wish to inform everyone who has an interest in all the substitutes for the real Haas because you are under the impression that one cannot grow a ďreal HaasĒ in Florida that you now can grow the real Haas even in Miami as my 4 Haas trees have proven. This is a previously patented variety called Haas Carmen. I bought mine in California 6 years ago and they are exactly the same variety you buy in Publix. The name is still under copyright so one can reproduce this tree but cannot sell it using the name Haas Carmen. There is only 1 nursery at this time in Homestead that is reproducing these trees but itís being called a Mexican Haas.  I gave Zill scions so that they can start reproducing this variety themselves.
Hard to believe Iíve got 4 beautiful big healthy Haas trees growing in Kendall with lots and lots of perfect Haas youngins growing and staying clean on the trees right through maturity. I have zero financial interest in any of this.

Seanny

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Are you getting 2 crops a year?

johnb51

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Thanks, Weiss.  Good to know. 
« Last Edit: June 15, 2020, 01:03:06 PM by johnb51 »
John

weiss613

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Flowers 1 time and fruits 1 time. Ready from 1st week in Nov to New Years.

pineislander

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brian

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For somebody not in the know... what is it about Florida climate that has prevented Hass from being common there while it thrives in California?

Also... what do people do with Florida avocados?  I tried making guac with one and it was terrible.  Eating one out of hand was ok I guess.

enomi

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I wish to inform everyone who has an interest in all the substitutes for the real Haas because you are under the impression that one cannot grow a ďreal HaasĒ in Florida that you now can grow the real Haas even in Miami as my 4 Haas trees have proven. This is a previously patented variety called Haas Carmen. I bought mine in California 6 years ago and they are exactly the same variety you buy in Publix. The name is still under copyright so one can reproduce this tree but cannot sell it using the name Haas Carmen. There is only 1 nursery at this time in Homestead that is reproducing these trees but itís being called a Mexican Haas.  I gave Zill scions so that they can start reproducing this variety themselves.
Hard to believe Iíve got 4 beautiful big healthy Haas trees growing in Kendall with lots and lots of perfect Haas youngins growing and staying clean on the trees right through maturity. I have zero financial interest in any of this.

what is the nursery in Homestead that has this tree? If you cannot say, please DM me.  ;)

Oncorhynchus

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Also... what do people do with Florida avocados?  I tried making guac with one and it was terrible.  Eating one out of hand was ok I guess.

With salt and pepper, on tacos/burritos, salads, burgers, basically anywhere you might use fresh tomato.

johnb51

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For somebody not in the know... what is it about Florida climate that has prevented Hass from being common there while it thrives in California?

Also... what do people do with Florida avocados?  I tried making guac with one and it was terrible.  Eating one out of hand was ok I guess.

The humidity and night-and-day warmth for six months.  Virtually no winter and no elevation in South Florida.  Some varieties of Mexican and Guatemalan origin don't like it here because they come from a different climate and a high elevation.  "Florida" avocados are West Indian race.  They have less oil content, which results in less flavor.
John

brian

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Thanks for the explanations!

johnb51

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Thanks for the explanations!
Just the way I see it--common sense logic, I guess you could call it.  I'm not an expert or a scientist.  But you're welcome.
John

pineislander

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Also... what do people do with Florida avocados?  I tried making guac with one and it was terrible.  Eating one out of hand was ok I guess.
Just like California peaches which finally make their way to Florida but were picked way too green and taste like tough cardboard likely the Florida avocado you got was picked far too early. Since our season has many risks if fruit is left on the tree many growers have fruit picked at the bare minimum of ripeness, when the fruit is barely mature enough to soften.

If left on, the fruit bumps each other and becomes defective, rubs on branches, gets knocked off in thunderstorms, attacked by scab, eaten by squirrels, stolen by thieves. The problem is worsened by indiscriminate pickers who may not know the difference between ready and unready fruit.

If left on to mature properly the oil content comes up, the better varieties here can certainly match Hass quality, some have flavor not found in Hass and of course are far larger.

canesgirl821

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Also... what do people do with Florida avocados?  I tried making guac with one and it was terrible.  Eating one out of hand was ok I guess.
Just like California peaches which finally make their way to Florida but were picked way too green and taste like tough cardboard likely the Florida avocado you got was picked far too early. Since our season has many risks if fruit is left on the tree many growers have fruit picked at the bare minimum of ripeness, when the fruit is barely mature enough to soften.

If left on, the fruit bumps each other and becomes defective, rubs on branches, gets knocked off in thunderstorms, attacked by scab, eaten by squirrels, stolen by thieves. The problem is worsened by indiscriminate pickers who may not know the difference between ready and unready fruit.

If left on to mature properly the oil content comes up, the better varieties here can certainly match Hass quality, some have flavor not found in Hass and of course are far larger.

Thank you! ďIíve had a few bad Florida mangoesĒ does not equal ďall Florida mangoes are badĒ.

johnb51

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Also... what do people do with Florida avocados?  I tried making guac with one and it was terrible.  Eating one out of hand was ok I guess.
Just like California peaches which finally make their way to Florida but were picked way too green and taste like tough cardboard likely the Florida avocado you got was picked far too early. Since our season has many risks if fruit is left on the tree many growers have fruit picked at the bare minimum of ripeness, when the fruit is barely mature enough to soften.

If left on, the fruit bumps each other and becomes defective, rubs on branches, gets knocked off in thunderstorms, attacked by scab, eaten by squirrels, stolen by thieves. The problem is worsened by indiscriminate pickers who may not know the difference between ready and unready fruit.

If left on to mature properly the oil content comes up, the better varieties here can certainly match Hass quality, some have flavor not found in Hass and of course are far larger.
I've been happy with fully ripened Simmonds and Choquette avocados.
John

JoeP450

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Hey Weiss,

Great to hear this, I will probably get a tree now...I first heard of Carmen from this video at 1:21 mark https://youtu.be/UyXb_WYKu3c basically the way itís described, sounds like an incredibly productive avo, and you are first report IĎve heard in FL. If you you can post some pics of the fruit Iím interested.


Thanks,

Joe

GFC

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I would like to know the name of this Nursery as well. Thanks

weiss613

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AG Farms Homestead Fl. Sells the Haas Carmenís but call before you go.
Here is a lousy video of 2 Haas Carmen trees 6 years old in Kendall
https://youtu.be/H0D8FTr_I_k

JoeP450

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Thatís awesome, my oro negro flowered all over the tree for first time and dropped all of its dime sized fruit not a single fruit remains...I heard itís because I donít water enough but then I see random and completely uncared for avo trees carrying loads of fruit. 🤷‍♂️

Joe

 

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