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Author Topic: Jaboticaba in limestone?  (Read 399 times)

HomesteadCody

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Jaboticaba in limestone?
« on: June 23, 2020, 05:32:14 PM »
Anyone have any luck growing red jaboticaba in the ground in South Florida limestone soil? I have one that I was hoping to put in the ground but was warned it may not do well down here. Thank you! 

cbss_daviefl

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Re: Jaboticaba in limestone?
« Reply #1 on: June 23, 2020, 05:50:33 PM »
My one attempt did not go well. At F & S park, the one I saw a few years ago was not healthy. I didn't put very much effort into mine but I think it will need a lot of TLC to thrive when planted in the ground in alkaline soil. They can stay indefinitely in a pot with good irrigation and fertilization.
Brandon

roblack

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Re: Jaboticaba in limestone?
« Reply #2 on: June 23, 2020, 05:51:00 PM »
Red, Sabara, Blue, unknown jabo, and others grow well here, not far from you. My yard is 3 inches of dirt (tops), and then solid limestone.

Dug as much as could, added dirt, peat, and other stuff. Created a mound.

The big one (10 feet?) has been in ground 4.5 years. Produces okay, 2 - 3 times per year.

They need lots of water. That is probably a bigger issue, and water chemistry perhaps. They seem okay with my city and well water; rain is the best.

Mine get partial sun, full sun several hours per day, and shade a good part of the day.


skhan

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Re: Jaboticaba in limestone?
« Reply #3 on: June 23, 2020, 09:14:35 PM »
Good to hear there is a chance of having success in ground down south.
Even with irrigation, water is the biggest challenge with my Sabara too.
I planted a Grimal in straight peat, we'll see how it does in a few years
Khan's Edible Oasis
Yard as of Jan 2019

tropical-farmer

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Re: Jaboticaba in limestone?
« Reply #4 on: June 23, 2020, 11:31:00 PM »
I have a sabara, a red, and 2 grimals in ground. Dug a long trench 20 ft long and 3 ft wide and filled with peat moss, perlite, vermiculite and planted them. Then i put a foot of oak leaves mulch on top. So far they have been doing ok. I water them with collected rain water if no rain for 2-3 days, otherwise soil underneath has stayed moist. I have done the same with rainforest plums i got. All are doing well, flushing lot of new leaves. No deficiency signs so far so there is hope. We will see how they do with time and during dry season when i will have to use the city water.
Satya

HomesteadCody

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Re: Jaboticaba in limestone?
« Reply #5 on: June 25, 2020, 05:08:19 AM »
I have a sabara, a red, and 2 grimals in ground. Dug a long trench 20 ft long and 3 ft wide and filled with peat moss, perlite, vermiculite and planted them. Then i put a foot of oak leaves mulch on top. So far they have been doing ok. I water them with collected rain water if no rain for 2-3 days, otherwise soil underneath has stayed moist. I have done the same with rainforest plums i got. All are doing well, flushing lot of new leaves. No deficiency signs so far so there is hope. We will see how they do with time and during dry season when i will have to use the city water.

How long have you had them in the ground so far?

Kevin Jones

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Re: Jaboticaba in limestone?
« Reply #6 on: June 25, 2020, 10:21:48 AM »
If you are concerned about ph issues you could try planting with lots of peat moss and heavily mulching with acidic pine straw and oak leaves.
Sulphur amendments might be beneficial too.

I had similar issues awhile back trying to grow blueberries next to a concrete driveway.
Never could get them to grow well.

Kevin Jones


JulianoGS

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Re: Jaboticaba in limestone?
« Reply #7 on: June 25, 2020, 10:54:50 AM »
If you are concerned about ph issues you could try planting with lots of peat moss and heavily mulching with acidic pine straw and oak leaves.
Sulphur amendments might be beneficial too.

I had similar issues awhile back trying to grow blueberries next to a concrete driveway.
Never could get them to grow well.

Kevin Jones

That is a good idea, wonder if it would work for South Florida folks.
Blessed are all who fear the LORD,
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You will eat the fruit of your labor;
    blessings and prosperity will be yours.

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tropical-farmer

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Re: Jaboticaba in limestone?
« Reply #8 on: June 25, 2020, 10:58:32 AM »
I have a sabara, a red, and 2 grimals in ground. Dug a long trench 20 ft long and 3 ft wide and filled with peat moss, perlite, vermiculite and planted them. Then i put a foot of oak leaves mulch on top. So far they have been doing ok. I water them with collected rain water if no rain for 2-3 days, otherwise soil underneath has stayed moist. I have done the same with rainforest plums i got. All are doing well, flushing lot of new leaves. No deficiency signs so far so there is hope. We will see how they do with time and during dry season when i will have to use the city water.

How long have you had them in the ground so far?



The sabara has been for 3 yrs now. Rest all are in ground for 2 months now and really loving it.
Satya

HomesteadCody

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Re: Jaboticaba in limestone?
« Reply #9 on: June 25, 2020, 02:58:59 PM »
It's good to hear that it's possible. Thank you for the ideas and inspiration everyone! I think I may just try it. By the way Kevin, I planted the Thai Dwarf mulberries I bought from you in the ground and they are doing fantastic. Looks like they will have some fruit soon.

 

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