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Author Topic: Working around shade  (Read 319 times)

TheVeggieProfessor

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Working around shade
« on: June 24, 2020, 07:57:40 PM »
Hi all. I'm a relative newbie. I'm slowly and steadily planting some fruit trees in my yard. I have a big yard, but live in the suburbs and there are lots of obstructions. Neighbor's palm trees are a real pain... I'm planting trees on the north side of my property and, depending upon the time of year, different areas get shaded out for differing amounts of time. Is there a way to strategize around this? When a fruit tree requires full sun, are there times of the year when it wouldn't be as big of a problem if it only got 4 or so hours? Thanks for any insights - I appreciate it.

Vigo Carpathian

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Re: Working around shade
« Reply #1 on: June 25, 2020, 12:47:41 AM »
What kind of fruit trees were you thinking?  In my opinion, it really comes down to the type of tree and where IT wants to be. Also, some of the less cold tolerant trees benefit from being placed on a north wall so they get more sun in the winter to keep them warm, while potentially better protecting them from the sun in the summer (if they have overhead protection).  One thing to keep in mind is that the type of sun is important as well. 5 hours of morning sun is very different from 5 hours of afternoon sun. The afternoon sun can be brutal to some trees.

TheVeggieProfessor

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Re: Working around shade
« Reply #2 on: June 25, 2020, 05:49:38 AM »
What kind of fruit trees were you thinking?  In my opinion, it really comes down to the type of tree and where IT wants to be. Also, some of the less cold tolerant trees benefit from being placed on a north wall so they get more sun in the winter to keep them warm, while potentially better protecting them from the sun in the summer (if they have overhead protection).  One thing to keep in mind is that the type of sun is important as well. 5 hours of morning sun is very different from 5 hours of afternoon sun. The afternoon sun can be brutal to some trees.

Thanks for your reply. I'm planting east to west along the north fence. The source of shade is just on the other side of that fence (and extends overhead, since palm fronds are growing into my yard, which I can have cut). Around 2:30/3:00, some of the space gets shadowed by palms, then a little later I lose sun in other places due to my neighbor's house (they have a high gable); at that point, the sun has cleared the palms and I get a bit more light in the previously shaded spot. I just planted a super haas. I intend on doing another avocado variety, another mango variety (I have one elsewhere on the property), probably a loquat, and then see how it goes. Mamey sapote is on my list too, but that's a pretty tree, so maybe for the front yard. I'm also willing to choose species based upon what will work best with the light that we have. I don't know if I've ever met a fruit I didn't like, so not a problem!

FMfruitforest

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Re: Working around shade
« Reply #3 on: June 25, 2020, 06:12:09 AM »
I have shaded areas to work around also, i would figure out the month in which the tree usually flowers and set fruit in Florida and aim to have it in as much sun during that period.

TheVeggieProfessor

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Re: Working around shade
« Reply #4 on: June 25, 2020, 07:38:12 AM »
I have shaded areas to work around also, i would figure out the month in which the tree usually flowers and set fruit in Florida and aim to have it in as much sun during that period.

Makes sense; thanks!

roblack

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Re: Working around shade
« Reply #5 on: June 25, 2020, 08:39:16 AM »
jabos, eugenias, cacao, and some garcinias are a few ideas

production may not be great or even good, but could try lots of stuff.

Kevin Jones

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Re: Working around shade
« Reply #6 on: June 25, 2020, 10:18:46 AM »
I used to have your same issues with shade.
Lots of weed trees.
Then a few years back... we had a tornado come through and clear out all my trees.
Now I have plenty of light.
Stuff grows better than ever.
And I've been replanting trees too.

Kevin Jones


 

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