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Author Topic: Does systemic fungicide wash off after Heavy Rain like copper protective ?  (Read 404 times)

bovine421

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I watched a YouTube video with a handsome fellow in a painter's suit who made the statement that after heavy rains copper protective fungicides can be washed off so potentially a person might have to apply up to three times in one week. My question is does the same hold true for systemic fungicides? Do they wash off after heavy rains or after asbsorption all is well?  I'm thinking if the systemic fungicide breaks down after 7 days and turns into a nutrient what harm would there be into using that over a long period time say bi weekly during rainy season. Copper predictive fungicide seems more labor-intensive because it rains practically every afternoon in summer.
« Last Edit: July 10, 2020, 10:50:39 AM by bovine421 »
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spaugh

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Systemic go inside the plant and dont wash off.  They go inside the fruit you eat too.
Brad Spaugh

Guanabanus

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All nutritional ingredients of sprays are also systemic;  while they stay plastered on the outside, they have not yet become truly nutritional.  Same with us, if the food we eat doesn't push its active ingredientes into our bloodstream and move throughout our bodies (the definition of systemic--- penetrating throughout a whole system), it just uselessly gets pooped on through.

"Systemic" is onely bad when it is about a poison in a harmful dosage.
Har

bovine421

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All nutritional ingredients of sprays are also systemic;  while they stay plastered on the outside, they have not yet become truly nutritional.  Same with us, if the food we eat doesn't push its active ingredientes into our bloodstream and move throughout our bodies (the definition of systemic--- penetrating throughout a whole system), it just uselessly gets pooped on through.

"Systemic" is onely bad when it is about a poison in a harmful dosage.
With that being said would you agree that the cool cat in painter uniform on video is handsome?  Would organocide plant doctor systemic fungicide work better for me on Ice Cream mango in the rainy season and maybe switch to cooper and sulfur during dry season? I am just a back yard hobbiest :) Thank you for educating the public
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ASCaXA2r_zY
« Last Edit: July 10, 2020, 12:41:01 PM by bovine421 »
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Guanabanus

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Since no rate is given for use on mango, as I recall anyway, we are on our own if we experiment.  Measure carefully, and be moderate in the dosage, going with not-more-than the dosage for avocado or citrus.  Better several mild applications rather than one heavy app, same as with fertilizers in general.  You can get other products with this same ingredient that are labeled as fertilizers, and that you may use on any plant that you choose.

I have not used these at Truly Tropical, as phosphite products are not allowed in organic production.  I wish they were.
Har

bovine421

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Since no rate is given for use on mango, as I recall anyway, we are on our own if we experiment.  Measure carefully, and be moderate in the dosage, going with not-more-than the dosage for avocado or citrus.  Better several mild applications rather than one heavy app, same as with fertilizers in general.  You can get other products with this same ingredient that are labeled as fertilizers, and that you may use on any plant that you choose.

I have not used these at Truly Tropical, as phosphite products are not allowed in organic production.  I wish they were.
Since avocados are sensitive to fertilizer I will go with the dosage for avocados. Right now I am using Bonide cooper fungicide. Montage of info. With sulfur fungicides make sure that you haven't sprayed neem oil within the last three weeks, and don't spray neem oil for three or four weeks after sulfur fungicides.
Powdery Mildew usually isn't very active in hot weather.

Plant Dr. June 15, 2020 at 10:56 am - Reply
Hi Peggy!
Neem oil should be safe to use with Plant Doctor.
Thanks!
« Last Edit: July 10, 2020, 07:45:52 PM by bovine421 »
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bovine421

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ORGANOCIDE Plant Doctor SYSTEMIC FUNGICIDE FOR THE EFFECTIVE CONTROL OF VARIOUS PLANT DISEASES

INCLUDING BLACK SPOT OR SCAB IN APPLE, ROOT ROT IN AVOCADO, BUD ROT AND
NUT FALL IN COCONUT, ROOT ROT IN CITRUS AND CUCURBITS, DOWNY MILDEW IN
CUCURBITS, GRAPE, LETTUCE, AND ONION,( ANTHRACNOSE IN MANGO), ROOT AND HEART
ROT IN PINEAPPLE, LATE BLIGHT IN POTATO, ROOT AND COLLAR ROT IN STONEFRUIT

Why is Organocide Plant Doctor Systemic Fungicide NOT considered organic.Is it because mono- and di-potassium salts of phosphorous acid are not naturally occurring in this state?

Plant Dr. April 27, 2020 at 9:03 am - Reply
That’s correct the ingredient is considered synthetic. Plant Doctor is a systemic fungicide  an EPA regulated product made from phosphites.  Plant Doctor treats pathogenic fungus through a systemic procedure and does not work on any type of insect. When a plant absorbs the readily available phosphite it triggers the plants defense mechanisms allowing it to defend its self from harm; similar to how a vaccine works on a human.

PLANT DOCTOR is both a preventative and curative.
It will control pythium & phytophthora (root rot) as well as powdery mildew (foliar disease).
After 14-21 days, it converts into nutritional potassium and phosphorus, that the plant consumes as nutrients and nothing is left in the ground.
It is also a bio-stimulant; once inside the plant, it stimulates the plant’s metabolism resulting in more plant vigor, increase bloom and crop yield, and increasing stress resistance.

AVOCADOS
Use ORGANOCIDE PLANT DOCTOR™ Downy Mildew Foliar Spray ¾ teaspoon per gallon of water

CITRUS
Use ORGANOCIDE PLANT DOCTOR™  diseases in citrus mature trees Foliar Spray 1 teaspoon per gallon of water.
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Mark in Texas

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I religiously add a non ionic surfactant to all my sprays, period.  If not you're wasting your time.

Best systemic OMRI approved coppers are Phyton 35 and Magnabon CX2005.  Magnabon is also good for fire blight control. 2 tsp./ gallon, 1 tsp. of a surfactant.  Becomes rain fast once dry.

simon_grow

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I agree with Mark in regards to spreader stickers but I like the added benefits of extenders as well. I recently started using Nufilm P, they were sold out of Nufilm 17. Once activated by UV, it is ran fast. The Nufilm 17 is a better extender and the Nufilm P is better if you are harvesting within a couple weeks because it doesn’t last as long.

These new types of spreader, sticker extenders significantly increases the efficacy of foliar sprays and will save you time and money in the long run. In areas with frequent rainfall, it will enable you to spray once and not have to worry about spraying again after rains.

Simon

Mark in Texas

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I agree with Mark in regards to spreader stickers but I like the added benefits of extenders as well. I recently started using Nufilm P, they were sold out of Nufilm 17. Once activated by UV, it is ran fast. The Nufilm 17 is a better extender and the Nufilm P is better if you are harvesting within a couple weeks because it doesn’t last as long.

These new types of spreader, sticker extenders significantly increases the efficacy of foliar sprays and will save you time and money in the long run. In areas with frequent rainfall, it will enable you to spray once and not have to worry about spraying again after rains.

Simon

Interesting and it's made by Red River.  I buy their NIS.  https://www.rrsi.com/product/nu-film-17/
« Last Edit: July 12, 2020, 11:05:25 AM by Mark in Texas »

 

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