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Author Topic: Santa Barbara Tropical Fruit  (Read 1417 times)

Brebarian

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Re: Santa Barbara Tropical Fruit
« Reply #25 on: August 01, 2020, 04:24:16 PM »
Fellow Santa Barbarian here! I'm in the San Roque area and have had a decent amount of luck with sub-tropicals.

Reliable Fruiting Success: Goldfinger banana (FHIA-01), Fredericks passionfruit, strawberry guava, lemon guava, Nazemetz and Coolidge pineapple guava.

Good vegetative growth but no fruit (yet): Orange Sherbet, Guava and Turpentine mangos, Honeyhart and seedling cherimoyas, Surinam cherry.

Poor vegetative growth + over-flowering or death: Sweetheart lychee, Biew Kiew longan, Pickering and PPK mango, grafted black sapote (Black Beauty from Florida).   

Too soon to see: seedling jaboticaba, seedling eugenias and seedling mangos from trade with a fellow TFF forum member.


V

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Re: Santa Barbara Tropical Fruit
« Reply #26 on: August 01, 2020, 05:15:34 PM »
Fellow Santa Barbarian here! I'm in the San Roque area and have had a decent amount of luck with sub-tropicals.

Reliable Fruiting Success: Goldfinger banana (FHIA-01), Fredericks passionfruit, strawberry guava, lemon guava, Nazemetz and Coolidge pineapple guava.

Good vegetative growth but no fruit (yet): Orange Sherbet, Guava and Turpentine mangos, Honeyhart and seedling cherimoyas, Surinam cherry.

Poor vegetative growth + over-flowering or death: Sweetheart lychee, Biew Kiew longan, Pickering and PPK mango, grafted black sapote (Black Beauty from Florida).   

Too soon to see: seedling jaboticaba, seedling eugenias and seedling mangos from trade with a fellow TFF forum member.

You have a good selection of subtropicals. How old are your mango trees?

The following subtropicals fruited for me so far:

Avocado (Reed, Lamb Hass, Kona Sharwil)
Babaco
Banana (Dwarf Namwah)
Grumichama (Eugenia brasiliensis)
Lemon Guava
Longan (Kohala)
Passion Fruit (Frederick)
Pineapple Guava (Nazemetz, Mammoth, Coolidge)
Star Fruit (Arkin)
Tropical Guava (Beaumont Red)

The following fruit trees of different varieties also fruit well for me: apple, fig, apricot, aprium, plum, peach, persimmon, loquat, pomegranate, mulberry, citrus, grape, blueberries.

Brebarian

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Re: Santa Barbara Tropical Fruit
« Reply #27 on: August 01, 2020, 07:24:17 PM »
You have a good selection of subtropicals. How old are your mango trees?

I bought the Guava, PPK and Orange Sherbet mangos from Frank (JF) in May 2019. They put out a bit of vegetative growth later that summer, but the Guava and Orange Sherbet are on their first major flush right now, with no blooms in sight, which is pretty incredible, considering they received no winter protection. Unfortunately, the PPK decided to bloom in May, and has no shown no signs of wanting to grow further.

The Turpentine is actually the water sprouts off of a Pickering that I picked up from Champa or Mimosa in 2017 (Florida rootstock). The Pickering didn't do well so I let the Turpentine rootstock take off and it's done surprisingly well (good shape, no drooping or flowering). I'll probably graft on SweetTart at some point in the future.

First picture is of my Orange Sherbet, the second is my Turpentine.





Brebarian

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Re: Santa Barbara Tropical Fruit
« Reply #28 on: August 01, 2020, 07:30:24 PM »
What is faux mangosteen?

If I had to guess, I'd say 'faux mangosteen' is probably one of the species of Garcinia that's more cold-hardy than a mangosteen, such as Luc's Garcinia, Achacha, Lemon Drop or Imbe.

V

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Re: Santa Barbara Tropical Fruit
« Reply #29 on: August 01, 2020, 07:46:16 PM »
You have a good selection of subtropicals. How old are your mango trees?

I bought the Guava, PPK and Orange Sherbet mangos from Frank (JF) in May 2019. They put out a bit of vegetative growth later that summer, but the Guava and Orange Sherbet are on their first major flush right now, with no blooms in sight, which is pretty incredible, considering they received no winter protection. Unfortunately, the PPK decided to bloom in May, and has no shown no signs of wanting to grow further.

The Turpentine is actually the water sprouts off of a Pickering that I picked up from Champa or Mimosa in 2017 (Florida rootstock). The Pickering didn't do well so I let the Turpentine rootstock take off and it's done surprisingly well (good shape, no drooping or flowering). I'll probably graft on SweetTart at some point in the future.

First picture is of my Orange Sherbet, the second is my Turpentine.





Nice looking mango trees! Since Orange Sherbet is polyembryonic, could your tree be grown from seed? That would explain why it doesn't flower yet (a good thing!). The same applies to Turpentine mango.

Grafted mango trees definitely bloom a lot and have about one flush of growth after the bloom. As discussed in this forum, we should only plant seedlings and let them grow to the size we like. Then graft, if needed.

I planted one 5 galon Manila seedling last year and one this year. I also planted 2 Sweet Tart seeds and 2 CAC seeds. The seeds just sprouted. These are polyembryonic varieties as well, so no grafting is necessary.

Brebarian

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Re: Santa Barbara Tropical Fruit
« Reply #30 on: August 01, 2020, 11:30:07 PM »
The Orange Sherbet has the slightly wavy leaf edges and is grafted on Manila, so I believe it will fruit true. Same with the Guava and the PPK, all grafted on Manila by Frank. I have no idea why the Guava and Orange Sherbet didn't flower this year, just lucky I guess.

The Turpentine rootstock is a seedling of course, so it makes sense that it didn't flower this year, and I'm sure it will eventually produce Turpentine-like fruit.

I agree that planting a seed is the best way to go, and I have a Buttercream seedling in the ground in a greenhouse just out of frame of the Orange Sherbet picture, which will hopefully overtake all three grafted mangos in time.

V

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Re: Santa Barbara Tropical Fruit
« Reply #31 on: August 02, 2020, 12:02:40 AM »
The Orange Sherbet has the slightly wavy leaf edges and is grafted on Manila, so I believe it will fruit true. Same with the Guava and the PPK, all grafted on Manila by Frank. I have no idea why the Guava and Orange Sherbet didn't flower this year, just lucky I guess.

The Turpentine rootstock is a seedling of course, so it makes sense that it didn't flower this year, and I'm sure it will eventually produce Turpentine-like fruit.

I agree that planting a seed is the best way to go, and I have a Buttercream seedling in the ground in a greenhouse just out of frame of the Orange Sherbet picture, which will hopefully overtake all three grafted mangos in time.

Good idea to use a mini greenhouse for a young mango seedling! I might try it when it gets colder.

Dirt Diva

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Re: Santa Barbara Tropical Fruit
« Reply #32 on: August 04, 2020, 01:03:23 AM »
Gophers !

My hubby insisted that I send y'all recipes for the gophers you kill

Happy Hunting and Gardening !
P J


Gopher Pie

1 Gopher, skinned and cleaned
1/4 cup onion
1/4 cup green pepper
1/2 tbsp minced parsley
1 tbsp. salt
1/8 tsp. pepper
4 1/2 tbsp. flour
3 cups broth

Cut Gopher into 2 or 3 pieces. Boil for 1 hour. Remove meat from bones in large pieces. Add onion, green pepper, parsley, salt, pepper, and flour to the broth and stir until it thickens. If the broth does not measure 3 cups, add water. Add the meat to the broth mixture and stir thoroughly. Pour into baking dish. Roll only enough to make it fit the dish. Place dough on top of meat, put in a hot oven (400 degrees F.) and bake 30 to 40 minutes or until dough is browned. Serves 6-8.

and from  Granny's Beverly Hillbillies Cookbook, are recipes  which  are for Possum shanks, Pickled hog jowls, Gizzards smothered in gristle, Southern-fried muskrat, Goat tripe, Stewed squirrel, etc.  that could be adapted to gopher.

Or you can adapt this recipe for gopher

Gopher, Groundhog, Punxsutawney Style

Cut, cleaned dressed groundhog in serving pieces. Parboil 1 hour in water to cover, with 1/2 teaspoon soda. Drain. Cover with fresh water. Add 1 teaspoon salt and black pepper to taste. Boil until tender. Drain. Roll in pancake mix. Brown in butter and shortening, mixed half & half.

Gopher Groundhog (or rabbit) in tomato sauce

Groundhog, cut into serving pieces
Salt
Pepper
1/8 teaspoon oregano
1 clove garlic, chopped
1 3-ounce can tomato paste
1 No. 2 1/2 can tomatoes
1 cup water

Brown gopher, groundhog (or rabbit) in hot oil with salt, pepper, garlic and oregano. Add tomato paste, tomatoes and water. Cover. Simmer until tender about 1 hour or more. Add more water if needed.
P J, the DivingTemptress and Dirt Diva

 

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