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Author Topic: Any other mostly tropical families with temperate relatives?  (Read 343 times)

PitangatubaMoray

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Out of curiosity, are there any other fruit bearing temperate plants. Other tropical families like ebony, custard apples, and passion flowers have members like american persimmons, pawpaws, and maypops, which grow in colder climates and bear edible fruit. Any others like this,like a cold hardy sapote?

Francis_Eric

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Re: Any other mostly tropical families with temperate relatives?
« Reply #1 on: August 22, 2020, 02:12:26 PM »
Sideroxylon Bully gum trees are in the Sapotaceae Family

I picked some berries In Illinois , North IL. I mean , but My native plant book says they wont grow this far North
tree was over 50 years old pretty big trunk.

This would be more of a flavoring for liquors
had a Celery smell very strong ,
dried berries had a numbing effect on mouth.

(I haven't soaked in alcohol yet to experiment )

Another thing that taste Good is Mayapples

while may apples are not tropical they taste tropical like lemon Berberidaceae (barberry family)
I think a hybrid would be interesting from another species of both of these
(I mean A hybrid like the natural hybrid between two species
 (like Sorbus x Pyrus (mountain ash berry x pear) Shipova found in the  1700 called A intergeneric hybrid

Francis_Eric

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Re: Any other mostly tropical families with temperate relatives?
« Reply #2 on: August 22, 2020, 02:47:32 PM »
I will have to get my book out I know of more just not on my mind right now.

I know Garcinia is tropical , but they hybridized it to grow in a temperate climate
My not make berries I do not know, but I am sure you can make a flower tea
they are suppose to have a strong flowery scent .

The RUE Family is Citrus
we have Tooth Ache tree berries Numb your mouth
I did pick old leaves for tea dried them  , 
Traveling I left them with Hawthorns , in the same bag and they rotted
suppose to be good for tea .

Lime trees suppose to taste like citrus as well Not genus Tilla (basswood tree )
will have to get my book to see the name

I know we have another Rue family member , but I am barely remembering the name this day
I know that one is in the rue family, but that is one of the reasons over the years to remember plant families
(to search online )
because do not want to get up ,and get  my book)
It is the hop tree Ptelea trifoliata

https://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Ptelea+trifoliata


Gum  Tree Chittamwood Sideroxylon lanuginosum  (formally genus bumellia)
 (in Mexico the bark is highly sought after medicinally putting the tree's at risk
 also grown in Hawaii I read as a street tree ,
 I'd been wanting to ask more of the people in Hawaii about it if they forage for it
but I wouldn't bet on it so not encouraged
https://www.backyardnature.net/n/w/gumbum.htm

Francis_Eric

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Re: Any other mostly tropical families with temperate relatives?
« Reply #3 on: August 22, 2020, 03:15:18 PM »
Oh you can guess I love tea's ,and bitter stuff haven't tried the hop tree yet
(of coarse sometimes sweetening transforms it as well ie. bitter chocolate
the fat in milk binds to the tannin smoothies can do improve flavor  as well. )


I forgot to add the chittamwood berry has more of a Juniper like flavor to me
Used as a flavoring At  least the one I've ate

One thing to note is the Latin name changed (Bumelia)
(See what I mean some sites may not list Sideroxylon --
(I was confused for a minute I read it there before )
https://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Bumelia+lanuginosa


There is trees that grow hot  climates , and adapted to grow in temperate places
Osage orange is native to Louisiana TX, and northern Florida , it grows here as well -20 F..
I am sure more tree's may adapt if they have a range tropical, and temperate
given they have some protection the first couple years just maybe no one tried .


With your post I think Solanaceae the tomato Family
maybe some of those can be grown as Annuals every year tomato is tropical,
 and they have the largest at fruit, and spice park over 20 years old

(native ) ground cherries are pretty good
Chinese Lantern is good as well 

water melon is in the gourd family native to Africa Cucurbitaceae has interesting fruits as well
maybe grown as a annual with a head start to ripen , generations of seed down the line maybe they will adapt
just like peppers did .

http://www.eattheweeds.com/tag/citrullus-lanatus-var-citroides/

(stag horn sumac (Rhus) is in the Mango family also poison Ivy ,
do not make a sumac ade drink with   the white berries use red
(by soaking the berries in water before a rain washes off the hairs the  taste is sour some hints of raspberry   )


« Last Edit: August 22, 2020, 05:54:17 PM by Francis_Eric »

PitangatubaMoray

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Re: Any other mostly tropical families with temperate relatives?
« Reply #4 on: August 22, 2020, 03:49:24 PM »
That's peculiar, I didn't actually think I'd get that much out of this. Small world.
« Last Edit: August 22, 2020, 03:57:18 PM by PitangatubaMoray »

Francis_Eric

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Re: Any other mostly tropical families with temperate relatives?
« Reply #5 on: August 22, 2020, 05:27:27 PM »
when you asked I have some things in mind,
 because I always thought it would be nice to hybridize things
 (sub/) tropical with the temperate families .

I made a mistake with that Water melon link
I thought it'd get more into detail with the (gourd) Cucurbitaceae family
(I have way better links but will have to wait   at this moment)

Searching on his site sometimes for the families I believe talk about the range of plants,
I could be mistaken though for another site (it's been a while),


I did know of people growing ginger (in Kentucky zone 7 )
covering the roots with mulch in winter
I did grow it, and brought it in myself (but forgot it )

I can say the leaves are nice to eat though a lemon like flavor
I forgot what type of food I added to maybe taco's or stir fried veggies pretty good I remember though.

Long ago I did find a ton of Ginger families will actually grow -20 F (-28 C.)
all not used for the roots some flowers , or leaves are used for Japanese cooking.


I see those Taro roots (traditional sacred Hawaii food)
 (as bulbs I believe Or house plants out side peoples houses )
(I believe as false rhubard or elephant ears )
those can be cooked never tried it yet myself. , but make sure it is the right one .
(wouldn't that be related to skunk cabbage (modify arum family)

I'm looking to see arrow root  , but online it lists
Marantaceae family  tropical  -- (not the same)

can be confusing because I am thinking of the arum family
which is mostly tropical as well


These roots are pounded to make a starch

that needs to be cooked (like taro) ---->( Not sure if at the moment all arum plants do though I thought not )
it has irritating hairs
Yes I have ate(chewed spit out) green dragon berries for a test RAW
 like eating fiber glass it's sweet though.

I wonder if there is something interesting to breed with that
or somehow cook them up, and make a specialty jam
would be expensive for rich people as they are a small woodland plant with maybe 30 berries per 8 inch plant plant.








 

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