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Author Topic: graft hybridization  (Read 387 times)

Nyuu

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graft hybridization
« on: September 05, 2020, 03:13:18 PM »
I was wondering if you guys know about it and do you think may have a potential creating something great

Ansarac

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Re: graft hybridization
« Reply #1 on: September 05, 2020, 03:26:37 PM »
Luther Burbank is credited (or should I say blamed) for creating a big, sweet 'Himalayan Blackberry', that was regarded as a pest and subjected to eradication.

Then, recently, a little, sourish 'Rockit Apple' was popularized.

Whether it is something great is a matter of how much it amuses you, personally, and how well you are able to market it.

Nyuu

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Re: graft hybridization
« Reply #2 on: September 05, 2020, 03:54:55 PM »
Luther Burbank is credited (or should I say blamed) for creating a big, sweet 'Himalayan Blackberry', that was regarded as a pest and subjected to eradication.

Then, recently, a little, sourish 'Rockit Apple' was popularized.

Whether it is something great is a matter of how much it amuses you, personally, and how well you are able to market it.

I think you misunderstand the question https://www.nature.com/articles/nbt.3010
Graft hybridization would be method of hybridizing without pollination but through a graft  at maybe great making a new hybrid between two different species
« Last Edit: September 05, 2020, 04:14:02 PM by Nyuu »

Ansarac

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Re: graft hybridization
« Reply #3 on: September 05, 2020, 04:13:54 PM »
I know about it and do think that it has potential.

Even without chimera or the sharing of genetic information, I think that epigenetic factors -- such as stressors, hormones, nutrient balance, and flow rate -- may create new varieties.

What is the market, or what purpose does it serve? Even though it would make a fascinating curio. perfectly interesting food is regarded as defective, when outside of very specific production values.

Nyuu

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Re: graft hybridization
« Reply #4 on: September 05, 2020, 04:16:57 PM »
I know about it and do think that it has potential.

Even without chimera or the sharing of genetic information, I think that epigenetic factors -- such as stressors, hormones, nutrient balance, and flow rate -- may create new varieties.

What is the market, or what purpose does it serve? Even though it would make a fascinating curio. perfectly interesting food is regarded as defective, when outside of very specific production values.
could be done with figs and ficus to add nematode resistant plants for rootstock

Ansarac

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Re: graft hybridization
« Reply #5 on: September 05, 2020, 05:27:35 PM »
I like it and hope that it succeeds. If something valuable comes of it, make sure that it is documented and under protection.

Epicatt2

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Re: graft hybridization
« Reply #6 on: September 05, 2020, 05:31:48 PM »
Some more about graft hybrids . . .

Due to the link on graft hybrids that Nyuu posted I became curious and did an online search,
finidng this article from 2009 that helped me understand what graft hybrids are, something
I had known nothing about before. The information in this article helped me understand what
graft hybrids are and how they occur.

This article may be of interest to some of the members here as it explains how graft hybrids
are induced to occur.

Here a link to the article:

New insights into plant graft hybridization

https://www.nature.com/articles/hdy2009115

Thanx, Nyuu! Today I learned something completely new and intriguing about what can
happen, resulting tangentially from making physical grafts.

OK HTH

Paul M.
==

Mike T

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Re: graft hybridization
« Reply #7 on: September 05, 2020, 05:53:00 PM »
Your talking about a phenomenon which is extremely rare and they can't be produced at will. The mosaic of genes in such plants means they are not hybrids really as there isn't a fusion of genetic material like when you cross plants. The chances of a bud forming right on a graft union combining genetic material from rootstock and scion are extremely low and for the new plant to have observable material from both is beyond rare. Such plants probably would have fruit/seeds either one or the other or both genetically but not halfway so grafting it might be the way to keep the ''hybrid intact'.

Epicatt2

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Re: graft hybridization
« Reply #8 on: September 05, 2020, 05:57:41 PM »
Your talking about a phenomenon which is extremely rare and they can't be produced at will. The mosaic of genes in such plants means they are not hybrids really as there isn't a fusion of genetic material like when you cross plants.

Apparently they can be produced at will, Mike.

That's what the peer reviewed article (q.v.) at the link I just posted implies.

Might be worth a look-see.

Just FWIW . . .

PM

Mike T

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Re: graft hybridization
« Reply #9 on: September 05, 2020, 06:33:59 PM »
Thanks and I will look

sc4001992

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Re: graft hybridization
« Reply #10 on: September 08, 2020, 05:14:38 PM »
Mike, I'm sure you know the Bizzarria citrus fruit, pretty unusual and neat looking.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bizzaria
http://www.homecitrusgrowers.co.uk/citrusvarieties/bizzarria.html

Never know when you might get one of these.

Mike T

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Re: graft hybridization
« Reply #11 on: September 09, 2020, 03:22:50 AM »
Wow that escaped my attention but has it now. What a striking example!

Nyuu

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Re: graft hybridization
« Reply #12 on: September 09, 2020, 04:51:26 PM »
Mike, I'm sure you know the Bizzarria citrus fruit, pretty unusual and neat looking.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bizzaria
http://www.homecitrusgrowers.co.uk/citrusvarieties/bizzarria.html

Never know when you might get one of these.

Is that just something else that's very interesting and rare but I don't think number .
Per sample if you're grabbed an orange graft onto a rough lemon the skin might end up rough on the Orange but the quality of the fruit will be the same only the appearance of the outside of fruit will be different

 

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