Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers



Author Topic: Difference between small and big mango seeds  (Read 235 times)

Carloscelis

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 22
    • Mexico
    • View Profile
Difference between small and big mango seeds
« on: September 15, 2020, 04:03:38 AM »
Hey guys! Is there any difference between a small or a large mango seed when plating them? Is the small going to yield a smaller weaker tree?

mangomadness

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 319
  • I like mangos,water-lillies & Amazon parrots!
    • United Kindom, Zone 9a. Eat for your organs, not your taste buds.
    • View Profile
Re: Difference between small and big mango seeds
« Reply #1 on: September 15, 2020, 06:42:11 PM »
I don't know :s !! Its, true, mango seeds have different sizes, and the trees of different varieties can have different sizes.

But, I don't think the seed size directly determines the plant size. (That's just my opinion.)

 I read that if you get a ''mini mango'' (which would have a tiny seed) you can still get big trees! This is what someone wrote on TFF:

''In taiwan there is a mini mango called farmers party #1.  The mango is the size of an egg and its quite sweet.  The tree is not a super dwarf though ''

http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=13544.msg175842#msg175842
With compliments

FRUITBOXHERO

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 408
    • Coral Springs Fl
    • View Profile
Re: Difference between small and big mango seeds
« Reply #2 on: September 15, 2020, 08:22:25 PM »
The difference between the large seed and the small seed is........................................... with the small seed you get more FRUIT!
Joe

simon_grow

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5699
  • USA, San Diego, CA, Zone 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Difference between small and big mango seeds
« Reply #3 on: September 17, 2020, 01:29:33 AM »
There is a difference but itís a long story. If your talking about the same type of seeds, say Kent for example, the larger seed would have more stored energy compared to a smaller seed so you would expect the larger seed to grow with a bit more vigor. In this scenario, Kent is a monoembryonic mango variety donít the fruit is the result of cross pollination or it was selfed( it was pollinated by itself) .

In either case, there would be a re arrangement of the genetic material and sibling seedling trees would all be slightly different on the genetic level and although they are all Kent seedlings, the re arrangement of the genetic material may have given one seedling a genetic advantage in terms of growth. In actual practice however, I have planted hundred of Kent seedlings and the majority of the seedlings grew at a similar rate.

When talking about Polyembryonic mango varieties, letís use Sweet Tart for example, I have noticed that the larger segments of the seed grew larger seedlings at a faster rate. Iíve had some very small segments of seed like a fingernail sized piece of seed sprout and it grew noticeably slower than its larger segmented siblings.

When you compare Monoembryonic to Polyembryonic seed sizes, it depends on the varieties and at which stage of growth you are talking about. Letís compare Kent to NDM.

Kent is a much larger seed because NDM usually has a very small and thin seed. Upon sprouting, the Kent seedling is noticeably larger and thicker in girth. Kent is great for stone or epicotyl grafting because of this fact. NDM starts out much thinner in girth and not as tall in the first few weeks or months but after it reaches a certain size, it just growth with extreme vigor and eventually outgrows the Kent.

These are my observations in my back yard in my climate with my specific soil conditions so others may have a completely different observation. Iíve grown many mango seedlings but take this info with a grain of salt and best thing for you is to test it out yourself.

Simon

Carloscelis

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 22
    • Mexico
    • View Profile
Re: Difference between small and big mango seeds
« Reply #4 on: September 20, 2020, 03:45:31 AM »
Thank you very much for sharing your experiences. I actually got a box of small sized Kents and a box of small sized Keitts and was planning on using the seeds as rootstocks. Do you consider this a good idea? Or should I use big sized Kents and Keitts?
There is a difference but itís a long story. If your talking about the same type of seeds, say Kent for example, the larger seed would have more stored energy compared to a smaller seed so you would expect the larger seed to grow with a bit more vigor. In this scenario, Kent is a monoembryonic mango variety donít the fruit is the result of cross pollination or it was selfed( it was pollinated by itself) .

In either case, there would be a re arrangement of the genetic material and sibling seedling trees would all be slightly different on the genetic level and although they are all Kent seedlings, the re arrangement of the genetic material may have given one seedling a genetic advantage in terms of growth. In actual practice however, I have planted hundred of Kent seedlings and the majority of the seedlings grew at a similar rate.

When talking about Polyembryonic mango varieties, letís use Sweet Tart for example, I have noticed that the larger segments of the seed grew larger seedlings at a faster rate. Iíve had some very small segments of seed like a fingernail sized piece of seed sprout and it grew noticeably slower than its larger segmented siblings.

When you compare Monoembryonic to Polyembryonic seed sizes, it depends on the varieties and at which stage of growth you are talking about. Letís compare Kent to NDM.

Kent is a much larger seed because NDM usually has a very small and thin seed. Upon sprouting, the Kent seedling is noticeably larger and thicker in girth. Kent is great for stone or epicotyl grafting because of this fact. NDM starts out much thinner in girth and not as tall in the first few weeks or months but after it reaches a certain size, it just growth with extreme vigor and eventually outgrows the Kent.

These are my observations in my back yard in my climate with my specific soil conditions so others may have a completely different observation. Iíve grown many mango seedlings but take this info with a grain of salt and best thing for you is to test it out yourself.

Simon

850FL

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 72
    • North Fl 8b/9a border zone
    • View Profile
Re: Difference between small and big mango seeds
« Reply #5 on: September 20, 2020, 07:50:38 AM »
There is a difference but itís a long story. If your talking about the same type of seeds, say Kent for example, the larger seed would have more stored energy compared to a smaller seed so you would expect the larger seed to grow with a bit more vigor. In this scenario, Kent is a monoembryonic mango variety donít the fruit is the result of cross pollination or it was selfed( it was pollinated by itself) .

In either case, there would be a re arrangement of the genetic material and sibling seedling trees would all be slightly different on the genetic level and although they are all Kent seedlings, the re arrangement of the genetic material may have given one seedling a genetic advantage in terms of growth. In actual practice however, I have planted hundred of Kent seedlings and the majority of the seedlings grew at a similar rate.

When talking about Polyembryonic mango varieties, letís use Sweet Tart for example, I have noticed that the larger segments of the seed grew larger seedlings at a faster rate. Iíve had some very small segments of seed like a fingernail sized piece of seed sprout and it grew noticeably slower than its larger segmented siblings.

When you compare Monoembryonic to Polyembryonic seed sizes, it depends on the varieties and at which stage of growth you are talking about. Letís compare Kent to NDM.

Kent is a much larger seed because NDM usually has a very small and thin seed. Upon sprouting, the Kent seedling is noticeably larger and thicker in girth. Kent is great for stone or epicotyl grafting because of this fact. NDM starts out much thinner in girth and not as tall in the first few weeks or months but after it reaches a certain size, it just growth with extreme vigor and eventually outgrows the Kent.

These are my observations in my back yard in my climate with my specific soil conditions so others may have a completely different observation. Iíve grown many mango seedlings but take this info with a grain of salt and best thing for you is to test it out yourself.

Simon

+1 to this! Hit it good Simon!

Iíll add one more thing to the note on polyembryonic seeds..Usually there are 1 or 2 sprouts in a polyembryonic (multi-embryo) seed that have way more vigor, and a single sprout that seem like a total runt (and can die quickly if not separated). Basically the 1 or 2 most vigorous sprouts coming from the seed (or in the case of citrus like grapefruits, 3 or even 4 vigorous ones) are ďclonesĒ of the mother tree, and I put that in quotes because I still suspect there could be slight variation, even though supposedly theyíre identical in characteristics to the mother.. and the runt is the one embryo in this type of seed that was either cross-pollinated or self-pollinated, but either way is a mix-up of genetic material. So I actually put emphasis on keeping the runt because it has the possibility of turning into something good.. but its totally a dice roll.. and the vigorous sprouts you already know what youíre likely to grow up. I love poly seeds, itís Godís way of giving us the best of both worlds when it comes to seeded propagation

 

Copyright © Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers