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Author Topic: Lower soil ph with sulfuric acid  (Read 355 times)

Lovetoplant

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Lower soil ph with sulfuric acid
« on: October 16, 2020, 08:07:50 PM »
Most blueberry growers add sulfuric acid (battery acid) in their irrigated water to help lower soil ph.  Anyone use it to help lower soil ph?  My city water has ph of 8-8.5

Soil sulfur take a long time to lower the ph.  I am thinking of buying battery acid from auto parts store to help lower the soil ph.

Kevin Jones

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Re: Lower soil ph with sulfuric acid
« Reply #1 on: October 17, 2020, 11:50:46 AM »
Would household vinegar work?
I know it is less acidic... but somehow it just sounds a little friendlier.
Might be safer to handle too.

Kevin Jones


EddieF

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Re: Lower soil ph with sulfuric acid
« Reply #2 on: October 17, 2020, 04:09:34 PM »
Someone here mentioned using it.
My guess drops per gallon.  Do you use pool test strips to measure ph ect?  I do.
Lots of calculating dilution ratios for final test.
I've used vitamin c powder, maybe 1/2 teaspoon per gallon which then gets mixed 16:1 by syphon.
Lowered it from 7 to 5.5 or so, will take pics next time.
Put 1 vitamin c in gallon of water & see how drastically it lowers ph.

Mike T

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Re: Lower soil ph with sulfuric acid
« Reply #3 on: October 17, 2020, 04:15:55 PM »
Normal fertilizers have sulphur and acidify the soil over time with use.

Lovetoplant

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Re: Lower soil ph with sulfuric acid
« Reply #4 on: October 17, 2020, 05:18:19 PM »
Someone here mentioned using it.
My guess drops per gallon.  Do you use pool test strips to measure ph ect?  I do.
Lots of calculating dilution ratios for final test.
I've used vitamin c powder, maybe 1/2 teaspoon per gallon which then gets mixed 16:1 by syphon.
Lowered it from 7 to 5.5 or so, will take pics next time.
Put 1 vitamin c in gallon of water & see how drastically it lowers ph.

Good idea.  Thank you for the suggestions.
May I ask where did you buy vitamin C powder and what brand?
Is citric acid you refer to as vitamin C?

Kevin Jones

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Re: Lower soil ph with sulfuric acid
« Reply #5 on: October 17, 2020, 05:28:36 PM »
ascorbic acid

Kevin Jones
« Last Edit: October 18, 2020, 12:21:09 AM by Kevin Jones »

Oolie

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Re: Lower soil ph with sulfuric acid
« Reply #6 on: October 17, 2020, 07:43:27 PM »
It works well, and you should use it, but only very dilute.

A few tablespoons per gallon should bring the pH right down.

I'm using it to titrate wood ash for a low chloride potassium fertilizer.

Mike T

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Re: Lower soil ph with sulfuric acid
« Reply #7 on: October 17, 2020, 07:45:34 PM »
Mulch and organic matter generates carbonic acid

EddieF

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Re: Lower soil ph with sulfuric acid
« Reply #8 on: October 17, 2020, 08:05:30 PM »
Ascorbic not citric acid.  Bought it from amazon.  1 vitamin c tablet will amaze you in 1 gallon of water.
I used it on my bananas after almost killing them overnight with silica i had read was good for something.
The C dropped ph quick, trees turned green after yellow rubber looking from sky high silica ph.
Doesn't last very long though.  I threw some sulfur on them since.  Soil not plants.

Frog Valley Farm

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Re: Lower soil ph with sulfuric acid
« Reply #9 on: October 18, 2020, 08:00:02 AM »
Mulch and organic matter generates carbonic acid
Plus 1 to this plan. 

I have the same problem, organic matter will fix the problem. For pots i only use rain water but I read a barrel filled with water and left in sun 24hrs. For almost instantaneous results use a lot of green in your mulch.  Manure, green chop or lawn clippings. 
« Last Edit: October 18, 2020, 08:05:39 AM by Frog Valley Farm »

achetadomestica

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Re: Lower soil ph with sulfuric acid
« Reply #10 on: October 18, 2020, 08:46:32 AM »
I used ph test strips and added white vinegar and successfully lowered the PH.
I was suprised it took several ounces and I was around 7 when I started.
It's pretty simple to keep adding one oz until you get the PH desired .
I also got a 50# bag of Tiger 90 from Diamond R for around $20 and I throw
a handful around trees like my macadamias and grumichamas and achachas.
I also throw a handful around my jaboticabas. I had some soil tested and it was 6.3
before I added mulch and organics. I also tested the soil around my trees and it
was closer to 7 after all the organics . I had a grumichama in my yard that was very yellow
for years. I tried to give it chelated iron and extra miracle grow drenches with no results.
I have been throwing handfuls of the sulpher the past year and finally the new leaves are light green.

 

EddieF

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Re: Lower soil ph with sulfuric acid
« Reply #11 on: October 18, 2020, 09:32:37 AM »
Cr90 is what i used too.  Wondering if the powder form is better to quickly get ph right & then cr90 to maintain.

Mike T

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Re: Lower soil ph with sulfuric acid
« Reply #12 on: October 18, 2020, 09:53:23 AM »
On reflection why acidify the hard way? Why not just use sulfur powder and fertlizers with NH4? A bit of extra Fe to compensate would help.

 

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