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Author Topic: Durio kinabaluensis, a high elevation edible durio  (Read 1909 times)

red durian

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Durio kinabaluensis, a high elevation edible durio
« on: January 31, 2013, 05:54:45 PM »
Currently on the lookout for D. kinabaluensis.  I have seen no fruits, no photos of a fruit, no trees, no photos of trees, but have read that it is happy around 1000m elevation and is not only edible, but has "cream to yellow flesh that has a pleasant, mild flavour and aroma".

Does anyone have information about / experience with this species?  It is not a labeled plant growing at the Tenom Horticultural Park.

FloridaGreenMan

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Re: Durio kinabaluensis, a high elevation edible durio
« Reply #1 on: January 31, 2013, 07:04:22 PM »
There are a couple pages of information and some photos of dried botanical specimens in the MARDI Durio of Malaysia book

   
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Re: Durio kinabaluensis, a high elevation edible durio
« Reply #2 on: February 03, 2013, 05:34:00 AM »
If it's growing in 1000m elevation is that a sign of letís say "cold hardiness", more that the other varieties?
Mike

red durian

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Re: Durio kinabaluensis, a high elevation edible durio
« Reply #3 on: February 03, 2013, 05:55:39 AM »
If it's growing in 1000m elevation is that a sign of letís say "cold hardiness", more that the other varieties?

Yes.  It may be more cold hardy than D. graveolens which has been reported up to 1300m, but which also grows at low elevation.

Soren

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Re: Durio kinabaluensis, a high elevation edible durio
« Reply #4 on: February 03, 2013, 12:29:53 PM »
If it's growing in 1000m elevation is that a sign of letís say "cold hardiness", more that the other varieties?

In relation to; we grow ultra tropicals at 1300m here in Uganda...
SÝren
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red durian

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Re: Durio kinabaluensis, a high elevation edible durio
« Reply #5 on: February 24, 2013, 01:55:27 AM »
A couple of days ago I spoke to 2 Dusun ladies who knew the fruit and the common Dusun name for D. kinabaluensis.  They live in Ranau, Sabah.  So, if anyone is to find this, Ranau would be a good starting point.  Flesh is thin, but fruit sounds like it tastes as good as durian.

durianwriter

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Re: Durio kinabaluensis, a high elevation edible durio
« Reply #6 on: February 24, 2013, 03:42:24 AM »
These are my photos of immature fruits in the Crocker Range near Kota Kinabalu.   I had to leave before they matured but my friend sent me some photos of the ripe fruit.  The shell is more yellow although they seem about the same size and the flesh is thin and white. I will have to ask my friend if I can share his photos on this site.

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red durian

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Re: Durio kinabaluensis, a high elevation edible durio
« Reply #7 on: February 24, 2013, 10:19:46 AM »
These are my photos of immature fruits in the Crocker Range near Kota Kinabalu.   I had to leave before they matured but my friend sent me some photos of the ripe fruit.  The shell is more yellow although they seem about the same size and the flesh is thin and white. I will have to ask my friend if I can share his photos on this site.


Wonderful.  This is the first image I have seen of the fruit.

FlyingFoxFruits

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Re: Durio kinabaluensis, a high elevation edible durio
« Reply #8 on: February 24, 2013, 12:47:28 PM »
Durianwriter,

fabulous photo!

thanks for sharing.
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durianwriter

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Re: Durio kinabaluensis, a high elevation edible durio
« Reply #9 on: February 24, 2013, 12:50:06 PM »
It's a very different shaped spike, which I thought was very aesthetically attractive. :)
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noochka1

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Re: Durio kinabaluensis, a high elevation edible durio
« Reply #11 on: December 01, 2018, 03:34:47 PM »
When is this durian in season?  I have been trying to get seeds for years and years, but no one ever seems to have them.  I'd love to trial it in Florida.  My Graveolens (orange) and Chanee have both recently survived 49 degree night temps unprotected, and I'm hoping that bodes well for them - but this one seems to have "all the right stuff" to survive here, if it can tolerate our soil.

sunny

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Re: Durio kinabaluensis, a high elevation edible durio
« Reply #12 on: December 05, 2018, 07:54:25 AM »
When is this durian in season?  I have been trying to get seeds for years and years, but no one ever seems to have them.  I'd love to trial it in Florida.  My Graveolens (orange) and Chanee have both recently survived 49 degree night temps unprotected, and I'm hoping that bodes well for them - but this one seems to have "all the right stuff" to survive here, if it can tolerate our soil.

You can try durian lablae from utteradit thailand...it grows in the mountains but has very small seeds (more meat). Maybe 1 in 100 fruit has a good seed to grow. It has low smell and is much more expensive for mongthong or chanee. I have grafted tree's, no more seed now.

https://www.meteoblue.com/en/weather/forecast/modelclimate/uttaradit_thailand_1605215
« Last Edit: December 05, 2018, 07:58:22 AM by sunny »

noochka1

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Re: Durio kinabaluensis, a high elevation edible durio
« Reply #13 on: December 05, 2018, 08:26:51 AM »
When is this durian in season?  I have been trying to get seeds for years and years, but no one ever seems to have them.  I'd love to trial it in Florida.  My Graveolens (orange) and Chanee have both recently survived 49 degree night temps unprotected, and I'm hoping that bodes well for them - but this one seems to have "all the right stuff" to survive here, if it can tolerate our soil.

You can try durian lablae from utteradit thailand...it grows in the mountains but has very small seeds (more meat). Maybe 1 in 100 fruit has a good seed to grow. It has low smell and is much more expensive for mongthong or chanee. I have grafted tree's, no more seed now.

https://www.meteoblue.com/en/weather/forecast/modelclimate/uttaradit_thailand_1605215

Very interesting.  I am interested.  Do you have grafted plants for sale?

sunny

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Re: Durio kinabaluensis, a high elevation edible durio
« Reply #14 on: December 05, 2018, 09:21:06 AM »
When is this durian in season?  I have been trying to get seeds for years and years, but no one ever seems to have them.  I'd love to trial it in Florida.  My Graveolens (orange) and Chanee have both recently survived 49 degree night temps unprotected, and I'm hoping that bodes well for them - but this one seems to have "all the right stuff" to survive here, if it can tolerate our soil.

You can try durian lablae from utteradit thailand...it grows in the mountains but has very small seeds (more meat). Maybe 1 in 100 fruit has a good seed to grow. It has low smell and is much more expensive for mongthong or chanee. I have grafted tree's, no more seed now.

https://www.meteoblue.com/en/weather/forecast/modelclimate/uttaradit_thailand_1605215

Very interesting.  I am interested.  Do you have grafted plants for sale?

In Thailand yes..

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Re: Durio kinabaluensis, a high elevation edible durio
« Reply #15 on: December 05, 2018, 05:09:06 PM »
When is this durian in season?  I have been trying to get seeds for years and years, but no one ever seems to have them.  I'd love to trial it in Florida.  My Graveolens (orange) and Chanee have both recently survived 49 degree night temps unprotected, and I'm hoping that bodes well for them - but this one seems to have "all the right stuff" to survive here, if it can tolerate our soil.
Season varies from year to year, but usually around now, December-January.
Oscar

 

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