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Author Topic: is it possible orange from cuttings?  (Read 451 times)

joaave

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is it possible orange from cuttings?
« on: November 10, 2020, 05:05:46 AM »
Hi friends...anybody knows how make to orange from cutting? Thank you

lebmung

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Re: is it possible orange from cuttings?
« Reply #1 on: November 11, 2020, 07:21:50 PM »
Yes it's possible, but most likely over the years will die of root rot.

850FL

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Re: is it possible orange from cuttings?
« Reply #2 on: November 14, 2020, 11:50:58 PM »
You didnít specify what type of orange. Sour orange yes of course LOL. Sweet orange depends on the cultivar and may eventually die off like he said ^

joaave

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Re: is it possible orange from cuttings?
« Reply #3 on: November 17, 2020, 04:31:06 PM »
ohh thanks everybody

Millet

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Re: is it possible orange from cuttings?
« Reply #4 on: November 17, 2020, 05:37:01 PM »
When a cutting is rooted and a tree grown. the tree can attain a long life with out dying from root rot.  Everything depends on the grower.  Cuttings grown into trees, have been done millions of times over the years,
.
« Last Edit: November 17, 2020, 05:39:17 PM by Millet »

850FL

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Re: is it possible orange from cuttings?
« Reply #5 on: November 17, 2020, 07:38:24 PM »
Depends on the specific variety and whether or not your soil type and microbiology is suitable for that specific variety to survive long term on its own roots (as opposed to being grafted onto a hardier rootstock)

TonyinCC

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Re: is it possible orange from cuttings?
« Reply #6 on: November 19, 2020, 10:41:49 AM »
It is possible to root citrus if you are patient. I did this about 25 years ago when I lived near Charleston,SC. This is how I had success with semi-hardwood cuttings. I cut the top off of a large 2 or 3 liter plastic soda bottle about halfway down. I made sure everything was absolutely sterile. I sterilized my peat/sand potting material in the oven and used boiled water to re-moisten it just enough. Nowadays bottled drinking water is everywhere so I would just use that. I scuffed the bottom inch of the cutting slightly. I sprayed the upper half of my cutting which had 3 leaves with Wilt Pruf. I dipped in rooting hormone, placed in bottle and then taped bottle back with duct tape. Leaves were not touching the sides. Finally, I screwed the cap back on. I kept it on a sunny North facing windowsill indoors. I never added water after that. Then it took a full year before the plant was ready to transplant. I successfully rooted Owari Satsuma which I think is rarely if ever rooted from cuttings. Same technique has been successful for rooting almost anything I have attempted. The key is the rooting medium must be BARELY damp, too much moisture and it will rot. A fungicide dip prior to setting the cutting might be beneficial as well. If you have a lot of condensation remove the top for a day or two, you want just the barest hint of condensation to form on a sunny day. A plastic bottle makes an ideal greenhouse.

Millet

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Re: is it possible orange from cuttings?
« Reply #7 on: November 19, 2020, 11:10:12 AM »
TonyinCC, Very informative post.  Very helpful.

TonyinCC

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Re: is it possible orange from cuttings?
« Reply #8 on: November 19, 2020, 01:33:57 PM »
The Wilt Pruf is a sticky pine resin spray that forms a protective coating to prevent moisture loss. Essentially rooting a cutting this way the plant doesn't need a root system or watering for many months for hard to root plants. It is its own self contained biosphere with no drainage holes. Too much direct sun could kill the cutting if it gets too hot.  A bit of bottom heat might speed things up. My cutting kept all its leaves until it was almost ready for transplant and started to push new growth.

lebmung

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Re: is it possible orange from cuttings?
« Reply #9 on: November 19, 2020, 05:15:29 PM »
TonyinCC that is long process to root!
Nowadays it can take 3 weeks to 3 months to root any citrus with the right hormones and and controlled enviorment.
Rootstocks are selected for a good reason, soil problems.

TonyinCC

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Re: is it possible orange from cuttings?
« Reply #10 on: November 19, 2020, 07:02:53 PM »
Yes it is very slow but also very cheap and easy to do. No special equipment like misting or heated rooting beds, and once you have the right amount of moisture you can seal the bottle and not touch it. I killed some other cuttings with too much moisture in the bottle during early attempts. If you used bottom heat it would speed up somewhat. Still rooted on a sunny windowsill at normal indoor temperatures but it took almost forever. I was told you can't root the original Owari Satsuma many years ago so I took it as a challenge. Anyone with a bottle and some rooting hormone and tape can use this on many different plants. I rooted a Eureka lemon with the same method and it took 6 months. There are better propagation methods if you are trying to mass produce but if you are on a budget it is hard to beat.
   I am very curious about using a similarly prepared cutting or even a leaf cutting with a bark/cambium sliver at the base and sticking it in an agar gel tissue culture type media in a sealed bottle instead of conventional rooting media under 24 hour lighting. Sort of like a bud graft but placed into agar medium instead of making a graft. Maybe someone has done something similar? It is a cruel irony that I was able to grow citrus in my yard near Charleston,SC and now that I am in South Florida it is the great HLB citrus graveyard. I had dreams of year round awesome citrus and now the HLB infected stuff tastes very bitter to me... I might find room for Sugarbelle if I hear anyone report non bitter fruit after infection. At least I have other awesome tropical fruit as consolation.
« Last Edit: November 19, 2020, 07:07:18 PM by TonyinCC »

EricSC

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Re: is it possible orange from cuttings?
« Reply #11 on: November 19, 2020, 10:59:30 PM »
Yes it is very slow but also very cheap and easy to do. No special equipment like misting or heated rooting beds, and once you have the right amount of moisture you can seal the bottle and not touch it. I killed some other cuttings with too much moisture in the bottle during early attempts. If you used bottom heat it would speed up somewhat. Still rooted on a sunny windowsill at normal indoor temperatures but it took almost forever. I was told you can't root the original Owari Satsuma many years ago so I took it as a challenge. Anyone with a bottle and some rooting hormone and tape can use this on many different plants. I rooted a Eureka lemon with the same method and it took 6 months. There are better propagation methods if you are trying to mass produce but if you are on a budget it is hard to beat.
   I am very curious about using a similarly prepared cutting or even a leaf cutting with a bark/cambium sliver at the base and sticking it in an agar gel tissue culture type media in a sealed bottle instead of conventional rooting media under 24 hour lighting. Sort of like a bud graft but placed into agar medium instead of making a graft. Maybe someone has done something similar? It is a cruel irony that I was able to grow citrus in my yard near Charleston,SC and now that I am in South Florida it is the great HLB citrus graveyard. I had dreams of year round awesome citrus and now the HLB infected stuff tastes very bitter to me... I might find room for Sugarbelle if I hear anyone report non bitter fruit after infection. At least I have other awesome tropical fruit as consolation.

Will the insect net be helpful to prevent the HLB?  I saw some discussion about it on web.

850FL

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Re: is it possible orange from cuttings?
« Reply #12 on: November 20, 2020, 08:09:55 AM »

Will the insect net be helpful to prevent the HLB?  I saw some discussion about it on web.

One bite though, and itís infected, right? Would help I guess if you seal the netting VERY well and donít have any leaves touching the netting to where the insect could still suck a leaf from the outside if the leaf is close enough.. at least my thoughts..

850FL

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Re: is it possible orange from cuttings?
« Reply #13 on: November 20, 2020, 08:15:31 AM »
Yes it is very slow but also very cheap and easy to do. No special equipment like misting or heated rooting beds, and once you have the right amount of moisture you can seal the bottle and not touch it. I killed some other cuttings with too much moisture in the bottle during early attempts. If you used bottom heat it would speed up somewhat. Still rooted on a sunny windowsill at normal indoor temperatures but it took almost forever. I was told you can't root the original Owari Satsuma many years ago so I took it as a challenge. Anyone with a bottle and some rooting hormone and tape can use this on many different plants. I rooted a Eureka lemon with the same method and it took 6 months. There are better propagation methods if you are trying to mass produce but if you are on a budget it is hard to beat.
   I am very curious about using a similarly prepared cutting or even a leaf cutting with a bark/cambium sliver at the base and sticking it in an agar gel tissue culture type media in a sealed bottle instead of conventional rooting media under 24 hour lighting. Sort of like a bud graft but placed into agar medium instead of making a graft. Maybe someone has done something similar? It is a cruel irony that I was able to grow citrus in my yard near Charleston,SC and now that I am in South Florida it is the great HLB citrus graveyard. I had dreams of year round awesome citrus and now the HLB infected stuff tastes very bitter to me... I might find room for Sugarbelle if I hear anyone report non bitter fruit after infection. At least I have other awesome tropical fruit as consolation.

Wow Tony that really sucks. I had success callousing Owari satsuma cuttings but none actually rooted.. they rotted out when I think it started to rain too heavy in the propagation tray. Never got a stupid eureka to root. However I always have success with Persian limes, Meyer lemons, sour oranges, swingler rootstocks, and MAYBE a navel here and there but I canít say definitively with that one. I find it interesting I canít root up grapefruits or flying dragon trifoliates but swinglers (a cross between those two?) root up like crazy.
Then again most of my rooting efforts are literally just in big 30 gallon pots of perlite sitting in dappled shade, so theyíre subject to environmental factors (not a sterile or Ďscientificí type environment

Also tony did you have success rooting Owari cuttings your method, but with defoliating the cuttings? Or did you just always leave all the leaves in tact?
« Last Edit: November 20, 2020, 08:18:23 AM by 850FL »

TonyinCC

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Re: is it possible orange from cuttings?
« Reply #14 on: November 20, 2020, 11:12:53 AM »
Leaves were left completely intact but coated with Wilt Pruf. This reduced moisture loss and allowed the leaves to survive and stay green. I knew it was going to take much longer because it was supposed to be the most difficult to root. It did take almost forever. Anything that callouses will EVENTUALLY root IF it doesn't rot first and it has enough chloroplasts and light to feed itself. I sterilized my system completely and made sure there was no excess moisture. It was a closed system the only water for a year was in the ever so slightly damp media. I had actually forgotten about the cutting until I saw a leaf had gone yellow. At that point it was just starting to push new growth. I left it in a couple more weeks until I could see roots on the bottle edges. My cutting was maybe 6-7 inches long with about 2 inches in the media, I felt the deeper it went the more likely to rot. Top of the cutting was green, the bottom half semi- hardwood. I forgot to mention I did a quick diluted bleach dip on the cutting. You could try finishing calloused cuttings in bottles. A foliar spray of kelp a day before taking cuttings is also a good idea.

 

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