Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers



Author Topic: Mango Growing in Florida: Atlantic Coast vs. Gulf Coast  (Read 270 times)

johnb51

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3183
    • USA Deerfield Beach, FL Zone 10b
    • View Profile
Mango Growing in Florida: Atlantic Coast vs. Gulf Coast
« on: January 11, 2021, 10:58:39 PM »
On the east (Atlantic) coast of Florida the salt-air breezes seem to keep mango trees grown closer to the coast healthier than trees grown inland.  How is it on the west, or Gulf, coast?  Do you normally have a breeze coming off the water and extending inland?  Are mango trees generally healthier the closer they're grown to the coast?  Any other differences between the two coasts, regarding mangos?
« Last Edit: January 12, 2021, 09:12:15 AM by johnb51 »
John

Jagmanjoe

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 65
    • USA, Florida, Lakeland, 9A
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Growing in Florida: Salt-Air Breeze on Gulf Coast?
« Reply #1 on: January 12, 2021, 01:08:56 AM »
I used to live on Tampa Bay and we quite often had salt air winds coming off the bay.  Also, my next door neighbor had 2 huge mango trees that produced large but fiberous mangos that had a great flavor and were less than 100 ft from the seawall.  These trees were never sprayed, fertilized or anything but, in season, the branches hung over one corner of my rooftop deck nearly 40 feet in the air and we could just reach out and pick them without any problem.

In the 12 years we had that property, we went through cold snaps, storms that literally splashed salt water against the seawall and over his single story house onto the trees, etc and the trees remained unphased by it all.

JakeFruit

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 232
  • Gulf Coast of Florida
    • zone 10A
    • View Profile
Re: Mango Growing in Florida: Salt-Air Breeze on Gulf Coast?
« Reply #2 on: January 12, 2021, 08:44:07 AM »
We don't get that steady, regular ocean breeze over here. Inland and|or offshore storm heads are common wind-causing events depending on the time of year, but you don't walk out every day expecting to see the palms blowing in the breeze. We also miss those frequent 5 minute rain showers. The Gulf has it's effects, but it's a lesser influence compared to the Atlantic. There are monster old Hadens, Kents, TAs, etc., growing on the barrier islands, but I've also seen plenty of big, healthy trees growing several miles inland.

 

Copyright © Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers