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Author Topic: Help in ID this fruit  (Read 291 times)

mangaba

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Help in ID this fruit
« on: February 20, 2021, 05:15:10 PM »
Could any member of this forum help me to Id this fruit ? Thank you in antecipation


Triphal

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Re: Help in ID this fruit
« Reply #1 on: February 20, 2021, 08:30:13 PM »
 Malabar chestnut ?

Nyuu

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Re: Help in ID this fruit
« Reply #2 on: February 21, 2021, 08:27:04 AM »
Malabar chestnut



The two colors flower variety
Nuts would be small


 And the bigger than that they're not the edible variety

Galatians522

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Re: Help in ID this fruit
« Reply #3 on: February 21, 2021, 01:03:43 PM »
Malabar chestnut



The two colors flower variety
Nuts would be small


 And the bigger than that they're not the edible variety

Are you fruiting Malabar Chestnut in Lake Placid?

Tropical Bay Area

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Re: Help in ID this fruit
« Reply #4 on: February 21, 2021, 01:37:18 PM »
Malabar  chestnut
Growing tropicals in the sfo bay

mangaba

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Re: Help in ID this fruit
« Reply #5 on: February 21, 2021, 03:59:48 PM »
To TFF members who replied to my posting, many thanks for ID and info

Nyuu

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Re: Help in ID this fruit
« Reply #6 on: February 21, 2021, 04:39:26 PM »
Malabar chestnut



The two colors flower variety
Nuts would be small


 And the bigger than that they're not the edible variety

Are you fruiting Malabar Chestnut in Lake Placid?
those pictures are from online but yes I have the two different type and you can easily grow them from cuttings

Nyuu

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Re: Help in ID this fruit
« Reply #7 on: February 21, 2021, 05:22:31 PM »
I also have one flower look like is one

At least by what I was told supposedly not edible


And the seeds look like is picture and only get a few seeds maybe six or seven per pod
Hopefully somebody might know better though
Last update for now




Malabar chestnut leaves


Seedling malabar chestnut





The leaves are the one that supposed to be not edible
« Last Edit: February 21, 2021, 07:54:07 PM by Nyuu »

Triphal

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Re: Help in ID this fruit
« Reply #8 on: February 21, 2021, 10:59:38 PM »
I also have one flower look like is one

At least by what I was told supposedly not edible


And the seeds look like is picture and only get a few seeds maybe six or seven per pod
Hopefully somebody might know better though
Last update for now




Malabar chestnut leaves


Seedling malabar chestnut





The leaves are the one that supposed to be not edible are
I think you are confusing with the leaves of another plant Justice adhatoda aka Malabar nut. In the Western South Deccan it is called 'adasoge' and the leaves are used for medicinal purposes of chest ailments. It is grown wild on mud fences and empty land and the leaves are rarely eaten by the cattle as they are very bitter. I have seen hundreds of them with white flowers but never seen those so called 'Malabar nuts' on them!
 Malabar chestnut is a different plant indigenous to Northern part of tropical South America and rarely seen and known in the Indian continent. I was lucky enough to see one plant with those fruits and leaves seen as above and never seen the flowers. Never eaten it and was told it is poisonous to humans! East India Company sent many workers to Guyana plantations from India. Most of them from UP and Bihar Hindi speaking belt and few from Telugu and Tamil speaking workers from the then Madras Presidency.  None from Malabar or Mysore. The name Malabar chestnut probably was mistakenly coined by the Colonial Brits in the 19th century and probably brought to India by one of the Colonials. I do not remember reading about this plant documentation in Dutch Governor Von Rheede's (late 1600s) Hortus Malabaricus pictorial volumes.

Nyuu

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Re: Help in ID this fruit
« Reply #9 on: February 22, 2021, 07:32:33 AM »
I also have one flower look like is one

At least by what I was told supposedly not edible


And the seeds look like is picture and only get a few seeds maybe six or seven per pod
Hopefully somebody might know better though
Last update for now




Malabar chestnut leaves


Seedling malabar chestnut





The leaves are the one that supposed to be not edible are
I think you are confusing with the leaves of another plant Justice adhatoda aka Malabar nut. In the Western South Deccan it is called 'adasoge' and the leaves are used for medicinal purposes of chest ailments. It is grown wild on mud fences and empty land and the leaves are rarely eaten by the cattle as they are very bitter. I have seen hundreds of them with white flowers but never seen those so called 'Malabar nuts' on them!
 Malabar chestnut is a different plant indigenous to Northern part of tropical South America and rarely seen and known in the Indian continent. I was lucky enough to see one plant with those fruits and leaves seen as above and never seen the flowers. Never eaten it and was told it is poisonous to humans! East India Company sent many workers to Guyana plantations from India. Most of them from UP and Bihar Hindi speaking belt and few from Telugu and Tamil speaking workers from the then Madras Presidency.  None from Malabar or Mysore. The name Malabar chestnut probably was mistakenly coined by the Colonial Brits in the 19th century and probably brought to India by one of the Colonials. I do not remember reading about this plant documentation in Dutch Governor Von Rheede's (late 1600s) Hortus Malabaricus pictorial volumes.


http://tropical.theferns.info/viewtropical.php?id=Justicia+adhatoda
Justicia adhatoda  the whole tree doesn't look similar to the one I have . Justicia adhatoda
Has a simple leaf and flower structure completely different

I got flowers and nuts off of my tree so I know it's a  specie of money tree / pachira
« Last Edit: February 22, 2021, 07:48:52 AM by Nyuu »

Triphal

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Re: Help in ID this fruit
« Reply #10 on: February 22, 2021, 10:15:50 AM »
I also have one flower look like is one

At least by what I was told supposedly not edible


And the seeds look like is picture and only get a few seeds maybe six or seven per pod
Hopefully somebody might know better though
Last update for now




Malabar chestnut leaves


Seedling malabar chestnut





The leaves are the one that supposed to be not edible are
I think you are confusing with the leaves of another plant Justice adhatoda aka Malabar nut. In the Western South Deccan it is called 'adasoge' and the leaves are used for medicinal purposes of chest ailments. It is grown wild on mud fences and empty land and the leaves are rarely eaten by the cattle as they are very bitter. I have seen hundreds of them with white flowers but never seen those so called 'Malabar nuts' on them!
 Malabar chestnut is a different plant indigenous to Northern part of tropical South America and rarely seen and known in the Indian continent. I was lucky enough to see one plant with those fruits and leaves seen as above and never seen the flowers. Never eaten it and was told it is poisonous to humans! East India Company sent many workers to Guyana plantations from India. Most of them from UP and Bihar Hindi speaking belt and few from Telugu and Tamil speaking workers from the then Madras Presidency.  None from Malabar or Mysore. The name Malabar chestnut probably was mistakenly coined by the Colonial Brits in the 19th century and probably brought to India by one of the Colonials. I do not remember reading about this plant documentation in Dutch Governor Von Rheede's (late 1600s) Hortus Malabaricus pictorial volumes.


http://tropical.theferns.info/viewtropical.php?id=Justicia+adhatoda
Justicia adhatoda  the whole tree doesn't look similar to the one I have . Justicia adhatoda
Has a simple leaf and flower structure completely different

I got flowers and nuts off of my tree so I know it's a  specie of money tree / pachira

That is exactly what I was saying since this blog ID came up on February 20th. I was the first one to reply this the same day!  Thanks for supporting my view the next day February 21st and after19 hours of my posting. Since I have personally seen both of them and knew these plant's taxonomy and uses for more than 7 decades I was only differentiating the confusing names of the two :MALABAR CHESTNUT  VS MALABAR NUT. Any part of the Malabar Nut aka 'adasoge' is not edible nor consumed but only used in local Ayurvedic and Unani medicine. The confusing so called 'Malabar Chestnut' is a misnomer as the plant was brought by the Colonials probably after the 18th century.

Nyuu

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Re: Help in ID this fruit
« Reply #11 on: February 22, 2021, 07:25:27 PM »
I also have one flower look like is one

At least by what I was told supposedly not edible


And the seeds look like is picture and only get a few seeds maybe six or seven per pod
Hopefully somebody might know better though
Last update for now




Malabar chestnut leaves


Seedling malabar chestnut





The leaves are the one that supposed to be not edible are
I think you are confusing with the leaves of another plant Justice adhatoda aka Malabar nut. In the Western South Deccan it is called 'adasoge' and the leaves are used for medicinal purposes of chest ailments. It is grown wild on mud fences and empty land and the leaves are rarely eaten by the cattle as they are very bitter. I have seen hundreds of them with white flowers but never seen those so called 'Malabar nuts' on them!
 Malabar chestnut is a different plant indigenous to Northern part of tropical South America and rarely seen and known in the Indian continent. I was lucky enough to see one plant with those fruits and leaves seen as above and never seen the flowers. Never eaten it and was told it is poisonous to humans! East India Company sent many workers to Guyana plantations from India. Most of them from UP and Bihar Hindi speaking belt and few from Telugu and Tamil speaking workers from the then Madras Presidency.  None from Malabar or Mysore. The name Malabar chestnut probably was mistakenly coined by the Colonial Brits in the 19th century and probably brought to India by one of the Colonials. I do not remember reading about this plant documentation in Dutch Governor Von Rheede's (late 1600s) Hortus Malabaricus pictorial volumes.


http://tropical.theferns.info/viewtropical.php?id=Justicia+adhatoda
Justicia adhatoda  the whole tree doesn't look similar to the one I have . Justicia adhatoda
Has a simple leaf and flower structure completely different

I got flowers and nuts off of my tree so I know it's a  specie of money tree / pachira

That is exactly what I was saying since this blog ID came up on February 20th. I was the first one to reply this the same day!  Thanks for supporting my view the next day February 21st and after19 hours of my posting. Since I have personally seen both of them and knew these plant's taxonomy and uses for more than 7 decades I was only differentiating the confusing names of the two :MALABAR CHESTNUT  VS MALABAR NUT. Any part of the Malabar Nut aka 'adasoge' is not edible nor consumed but only used in local Ayurvedic and Unani medicine. The confusing so called 'Malabar Chestnut' is a misnomer as the plant was brought by the Colonials probably after the 18th century.

My concern is just because one species is edible doesn't make them all edible .
For example jatropha almost all of them are toxic
Yet you have one at is edible http://www.jatropower.ch/

 

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