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Author Topic: Biologists are working to preserve the cambucá in the mountainous region of Rio  (Read 3943 times)

Jackfruitwhisperer69

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Hi Cambucá Lovers,
Here's an awesome article on the preservation of Cambucá 8) Make sure to watch the vid ;)



http://g1.globo.com/economia/agronegocios/vida-rural/noticia/2013/02/biologos-trabalham-para-preservar-o-cambuca-na-regiao-serrana-do-rj.html

I translated the article so that everyone, can read the article :)

Biologists are working to preserve the cambucá in the mountainous region of Rio de Janeiro.

Tree with a rounded canopy and strong branched/trunked is native to the Atlantic Forest.
Deforestation has put the species at risk of extinction.

Biologists of the Cambucás Project was developed in Rio de Janeiro, with the intent of preserving this  majestic specie, with the rounded canopy and strong branched that is native to the Atlantic Forest. Manmade deforestation, puts the fruit tree in danger of extinction. The long time before coming into production, makes the cambucá a non commercial fruit, which aggravates the problem. The first fruits begin to appear by the age of 15 and 18 years old.

A survey conducted by the biologist Fabian Correa, coordinator of the Project Cambucás in Cantagalo, in the mountainous region of Rio de Janeiro, showed that there are eight specimens of the tree on private land, in the rural area and nearby areas. On a farm in the region, which is from 19th century, has only two cambucá trees.

The project coordinator says that the goal is to increase the number of trees. "One of the ideas of the project is to rescue the cambucá's that are present in backyards, so that we will have more and more locations with the this tree...farms and backyards with cambucá" says Fabian.

The cambucá is in the same family as Jabuticaba and there are several common features between the two. One being the slow growth. In areas of dense forest, the cambucá tree can reach 10m/33ft tall, but the size of the tree is a bit smaller when cultivated in orchards. Each fruit has a single seed and germination takes about 40 to one hundred days, after the seed has been planted. The first fruits begin to appear when the tree is about 15 or 18 years old. The fruits appear generally in the months of December and January, but some trees bloom later.

Eating the fruit little known and is becoming a privilege for those who have the opportunity to experience the cambucá fruit. Besides being tasty, the fruit is very important for the ecological balance. According to experts, many species feed on cambucá.

The owner of a site, Thaís Campanate says that she has taken special care not to let the tree die. She also supports the project and says that she has planted more trees on site. In 12 years, many people were part of the group fighting to not let the cambucazeiros(Cambucá trees) to disappear from the region. The idea has also turned into a book for children, which reinforces the importance of preserving this relic from nature. The project inspired José Guilherme, who accompanied the start of the project, who then choose to become a environmental technician.

Time is like a river.
You cannot touch the same water twice, because the flow that has passed will never pass again.
Enjoy every moment of your life!

FlyingFoxFruits

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Steven

thanks for posting this information!!

what a great find.



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jez251

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Thanks for posting Steven. One thing I learned was the correct pronunciation of the fruit name. I would always stress the 2nd syllable.

15-18 years to wait for fruit, huh? Damn...

When my seedlings get bigger I will be asking someone for budwood to graft for sure.

Thanks again,
Jaime

tropical66

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 Steven,

 Thanks for posting this good article and information.


 cheers
There is nothing more beautiful than PEACE - Unite All Mankind.

FlyingFoxFruits

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good luck...

this species is one of the hardest to graft of all Myrciaria / Plinia I've tried.

it's so deceivingly easy to cut...but they seldom take.

Thanks for posting Steven. One thing I learned was the correct pronunciation of the fruit name. I would always stress the 2nd syllable.

15-18 years to wait for fruit, huh? Damn...

When my seedlings get bigger I will be asking someone for budwood to graft for sure.

Thanks again,
Jaime
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Jackfruitwhisperer69

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Hi Adam, Jaime and Faezal,

You guys are most welcome :) I found this article on Facebooks and said i must share this on the forum  ;D

 Happy to hear you guys also enjoyed the article :) Cambucá has definitely potencial, and hopefully the numer of trees will increase, year after year...They should make a festival for Cambucá, as this will also help to secure the future of Cambucá and also help people that own the trees to make some extra cash on selling fresh Cambucá fruit and products derived from the fruit 8)

Jaime, I think the 15-18 years before producing, is the time that trees take to produce in the wild. I reckon if them trees that are properly taken care of...should produce by 8-10 years.  :)
Time is like a river.
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Enjoy every moment of your life!

fruitlovers

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Thanks for posting Steven. One thing I learned was the correct pronunciation of the fruit name. I would always stress the 2nd syllable.

15-18 years to wait for fruit, huh? Damn...

When my seedlings get bigger I will be asking someone for budwood to graft for sure.

Thanks again,
Jaime

Hi Jaime, i'm happy to tell you that this information is not correct. My cambuca tree took about 10 years to fruit. And that was because i gave it too much shade. My second cambuca tree i planted in full sun and is growing twice as fast. It fruited in about 6 years. I think though grafting would be good idea to experiment with, especially since you have the Myrtaceous wiz kid (Adam) in your neck of the woods. ;)
Oscar

jez251

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I'll keep that in mind, Oscar.

Ten years is still a looong time to wait for fruit.

Grafting, however difficult, is the way to go!

Jaime

fruitlovers

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I'll keep that in mind, Oscar.

Ten years is still a looong time to wait for fruit.

Grafting, however difficult, is the way to go!

Jaime

Amigo, did you read my whole message? It said under ideal conditions you can get it to fruit in 6 years.
Oscar

jez251

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You're right, compadre, I did miss that bit of info... If we keep going like this pretty soon the cambuca will be fruiting in 3 years... That's where grafting comes in!

Jaime

fruitlovers

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You're right, compadre, I did miss that bit of info... If we keep going like this pretty soon the cambuca will be fruiting in 3 years... That's where grafting comes in!

Jaime

Or how about hybrid (precoce) cambuca seedlings that fruit from seed in 3 years?  ;D
Oscar

jez251

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Let me know when you start selling those!!!

fruitlovers

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Let me know when you start selling those!!!

Almost anything is possible in this world of plants. For sure you will be one of the first to know about it if and when it happens.  ;)
Oscar

FlyingFoxFruits

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Let me know when you start selling those!!!

it's the same as the Red jabo...Pine Island sells them now.
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fruitlovers

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Let me know when you start selling those!!!

it's the same as the Red jabo...Pine Island sells them now.

We were talking about future possibility of hybrid (precocious) cambuca, not jaboticaba.
Oscar

FlyingFoxFruits

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HAHA!

great idea....send me some scions when you're finished with your hybridization efforts!

Let me know when you start selling those!!!

it's the same as the Red jabo...Pine Island sells them now.

We were talking about future possibility of hybrid (precocious) cambuca, not jaboticaba.
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murahilin

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We were talking about future possibility of hybrid (precocious) cambuca, not jaboticaba.

No one in this thread has been reading your entire post. Half a sentence in and they respond. Lol

jez251

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It's from all of the excitement of the subject that we can't wait to respond...!  8)

FlyingFoxFruits

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It's from all of the excitement of the subject that we can't wait to respond...!  8)
;D
right on!
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fruitlovers

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HAHA!

great idea....send me some scions when you're finished with your hybridization efforts!

Let me know when you start selling those!!!

it's the same as the Red jabo...Pine Island sells them now.

We were talking about future possibility of hybrid (precocious) cambuca, not jaboticaba.

Adam, if you want can send you cambuca scions and you can try grafting them onto your cocktail trees?
Oscar

Jackfruitwhisperer69

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Thanks for posting Steven. One thing I learned was the correct pronunciation of the fruit name. I would always stress the 2nd syllable.

15-18 years to wait for fruit, huh? Damn...

When my seedlings get bigger I will be asking someone for budwood to graft for sure.

Thanks again,
Jaime

Hi Jaime, i'm happy to tell you that this information is not correct. My cambuca tree took about 10 years to fruit. And that was because i gave it too much shade. My second cambuca tree i planted in full sun and is growing twice as fast. It fruited in about 6 years. I think though grafting would be good idea to experiment with, especially since you have the Myrtaceous wiz kid (Adam) in your neck of the woods. ;)

Oscar,
Great to hear that cambucá doesn't take so long to produce 8) Thanks for sharing...Full sun for cambucá, you got it, Sir ;D
Time is like a river.
You cannot touch the same water twice, because the flow that has passed will never pass again.
Enjoy every moment of your life!

FlyingFoxFruits

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Oscar!

thanks for the offer, but it won't work!  I tried many times with the mature scions I have at my disposal.



HAHA!

great idea....send me some scions when you're finished with your hybridization efforts!

Let me know when you start selling those!!!

it's the same as the Red jabo...Pine Island sells them now.

We were talking about future possibility of hybrid (precocious) cambuca, not jaboticaba.

Adam, if you want can send you cambuca scions and you can try grafting them onto your cocktail trees?
www.FlyingFoxFruits.com

www.PLINIAS.com

www.youtube.com/FlyingFoxFruits

I disabled the forum's personal messaging system, please send an email to contact me, FlyingFoxFruits@gmail.com

fruitlovers

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Thanks for posting Steven. One thing I learned was the correct pronunciation of the fruit name. I would always stress the 2nd syllable.

15-18 years to wait for fruit, huh? Damn...

When my seedlings get bigger I will be asking someone for budwood to graft for sure.

Thanks again,
Jaime

Hi Jaime, i'm happy to tell you that this information is not correct. My cambuca tree took about 10 years to fruit. And that was because i gave it too much shade. My second cambuca tree i planted in full sun and is growing twice as fast. It fruited in about 6 years. I think though grafting would be good idea to experiment with, especially since you have the Myrtaceous wiz kid (Adam) in your neck of the woods. ;)

Oscar,
Great to hear that cambucá doesn't take so long to produce 8) Thanks for sharing...Full sun for cambucá, you got it, Sir ;D

I should clarify, so you don't toast your plants and blame me.  :'(  Like so many plants the small seedling plants appreciate some shade, especially in summer or places with high intensity of UV. Once they get 1-2 feet tall they can go into full sun.
Oscar

Jackfruitwhisperer69

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Thanks for posting Steven. One thing I learned was the correct pronunciation of the fruit name. I would always stress the 2nd syllable.

15-18 years to wait for fruit, huh? Damn...

When my seedlings get bigger I will be asking someone for budwood to graft for sure.

Thanks again,
Jaime

Hi Jaime, i'm happy to tell you that this information is not correct. My cambuca tree took about 10 years to fruit. And that was because i gave it too much shade. My second cambuca tree i planted in full sun and is growing twice as fast. It fruited in about 6 years. I think though grafting would be good idea to experiment with, especially since you have the Myrtaceous wiz kid (Adam) in your neck of the woods. ;)

Oscar,
Great to hear that cambucá doesn't take so long to produce 8) Thanks for sharing...Full sun for cambucá, you got it, Sir ;D

I should clarify, so you don't toast your plants and blame me.  :'(  Like so many plants the small seedling plants appreciate some shade, especially in summer or places with high intensity of UV. Once they get 1-2 feet tall they can go into full sun.

Hi Oscar,
 ;D I always give shade to young trees for the first few months, or until they can take the sun :) The sun here will definitely burn the leaves. My cambucá ain't feeling happy and is in intensive care...receiving what the Plinia doctor ordered...hopefully the tree will recover asap :)
Time is like a river.
You cannot touch the same water twice, because the flow that has passed will never pass again.
Enjoy every moment of your life!

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