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Author Topic: More Custard Apples Parkland FL  (Read 6406 times)

FloridaGreenMan

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More Custard Apples Parkland FL
« on: February 22, 2012, 09:38:25 PM »
Here's some more "Birthday Cake" Custard Apples from George's property in Parkland FL. These fruits have been ripening for a few weeks already. The flavor this year is very nice but can be inconsistent from year to year. He had frost on his property this year that severely injured 2 mid size mangos and a Jakfruit but this tree was untouched by the cold.     
 




FloridaGreenMan

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Re: More Custard Apples Parkland FL
« Reply #1 on: February 22, 2012, 11:16:56 PM »
That's a beauty. The satenaya was top notch!
Jeff  :-)

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Re: More Custard Apples Parkland FL
« Reply #2 on: February 22, 2012, 11:27:34 PM »
That's a beauty. The satenaya was top notch!

that's a beauty! Is there such thing as a Florida Red Atemoya?

JF

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Re: More Custard Apples Parkland FL
« Reply #3 on: February 23, 2012, 01:21:25 AM »
Nice size and color.!
Søren
Kampala, Uganda

Felipe

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Re: More Custard Apples Parkland FL
« Reply #4 on: February 23, 2012, 10:08:43 AM »
Is it the same cultivar on both pictures?? Sarteneja?

Thanks for sharing :)

Tropicalgrower89

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Re: More Custard Apples Parkland FL
« Reply #5 on: February 23, 2012, 02:25:57 PM »
Nice!  :)
Alexi

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Re: More Custard Apples Parkland FL
« Reply #6 on: February 23, 2012, 02:37:37 PM »
Nice,

Looks like a short tree...how tall? how old?

10ft? 4yrs?

I'd see why you'd say they are cold tolerant now!

It would be neat if this one was more cold tolerant than most!

Maybe we can set a small plant next to this tree, of a different variety A.reticulata, to see if there is a difference.

Thanks for posting pics! :)


Ethan

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Re: More Custard Apples Parkland FL
« Reply #7 on: February 25, 2012, 01:25:42 AM »
Fruit looks great, flavor sounds even better, lucky fellow!

-Ethan

FloridaGreenMan

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Re: More Custard Apples Parkland FL
« Reply #8 on: February 25, 2012, 08:16:44 PM »
That's a beauty. The satenaya was top notch!

that's a beauty! Is there such thing as a Florida Red Atemoya?

JF

I have never heard of a Florida Red Atemoya. In many foreign fruit articles/websites, you see "Florida" used in many fruit names but they may not always be from here!     

 
FloridaGreenMan

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Re: More Custard Apples Parkland FL
« Reply #9 on: February 26, 2012, 02:36:20 AM »
Quote
Quote
that's a beauty! Is there such thing as a Florida Red Atemoya?

JF

I have never heard of a Florida Red Atemoya. In many foreign fruit articles/websites, you see "Florida" used in many fruit names but they may not always be from here!     

that figures! who know what these nursery guys are passing as a Florida Red Atemoya. Is there even a red atemoya?

JF
« Last Edit: February 26, 2012, 11:38:39 AM by murahilin »

murahilin

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Re: More Custard Apples Parkland FL
« Reply #10 on: February 26, 2012, 12:40:01 PM »

that figures! who know what these nursery guys are passing as a Florida Red Atemoya. Is there even a red atemoya?

JF

There are redder atemoya x custard apple crosses. Not sure if there any pure atemoyas that are red.

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Re: More Custard Apples Parkland FL
« Reply #11 on: February 26, 2012, 01:12:28 PM »
I haven't ever seen a red atemoya.  Lisa tends to be pinkish.  But the ones I have seen are pretty washed out.  That atemoya/custard apple cross posted about in another thread was as close as I have seen.  It looks like an atemoya.  Would love to know how it tastes.

Harry
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Re: More Custard Apples Parkland FL
« Reply #12 on: February 26, 2012, 03:31:38 PM »
how tall? how old?

10ft? 4yrs?

FloridaGreenMan

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Re: More Custard Apples Parkland FL
« Reply #13 on: February 26, 2012, 07:40:11 PM »
Is it the same cultivar on both pictures?? Sarteneja?

Thanks for sharing :)

Felipe, yes, these are one and the same! I am pretty sure it's Sarteneja but the tags were lost so we are not 100% sure.     
FloridaGreenMan

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Re: More Custard Apples Parkland FL
« Reply #14 on: February 26, 2012, 08:10:19 PM »
Nice Custard-Apple!  Reticulatas, or Custard-Apples, are among my favorite fruits, especially as they fruit in the late winter and spring, when most other fruits aren't on.

Your comment about inconsistency is appropo.   The quality of most fresh produce varies from soil, weather conditions, and cultural inputs--- grapes and custard-apples famously and infamously so.

The higher the BRIX of the fruit and the plant's sap, the brighter the color, the better the taste, and the more cold hardy, drought hardy, etc.  BRIX is the concentration of suspended solids, i.e. mineral nutrients and glucose.  Mineral nutrients often underutilized are Calcium and Silicon.

The amount of leaf surface IN THE SUN on a branch greatly affects the quality of fruits on that branch.

I do not know of a fruit called 'Florida Red Atemoya.'  As has already been pointed out, the '48--26' (a.k.a. 'Lisa'), which I bred at Zill High Performance Plants back in the 1980's, is pale pink.

The word "ATEMOYA" correctly aplies only to Annona Hybrids that are 1/2 Ata (Sugar-Apple) and 1/2 "-moya" (the last half of the word "cherimoya").

If there are three or more species in the ancestry of an Annona hybrid, it is best to simply call it an ANNONA HYBRID!  A cooked-up word, (just as "atemoya" is a cooked-up word), such as "Temoylata" could be used [for a (Sugar-Apple x Cherimoya) x Reticulata, but will always have to end up being explained, here.

All the best,
Guanabanus,  a.k.a. Har Mahdeem
Har

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Re: More Custard Apples Parkland FL
« Reply #15 on: February 26, 2012, 08:15:26 PM »
Nice Custard-Apple!  Reticulatas, or Custard-Apples, are among my favorite fruits, especially as they fruit in the late winter and spring, when most other fruits aren't on.

Your comment about inconsistency is appropo.   The quality of most fresh produce varies from soil, weather conditions, and cultural inputs--- grapes and custard-apples famously and infamously so.

The higher the BRIX of the fruit and the plant's sap, the brighter the color, the better the taste, and the more cold hardy, drought hardy, etc.  BRIX is the concentration of suspended solids, i.e. mineral nutrients and glucose.  Mineral nutrients often underutilized are Calcium and Silicon.

The amount of leaf surface IN THE SUN on a branch greatly affects the quality of fruits on that branch.

I do not know of a fruit called 'Florida Red Atemoya.'  As has already been pointed out, the '48--26' (a.k.a. 'Lisa'), which I bred at Zill High Performance Plants back in the 1980's, is pale pink.

The word "ATEMOYA" correctly aplies only to Annona Hybrids that are 1/2 Ata (Sugar-Apple) and 1/2 "-moya" (the last half of the word "cherimoya").

If there are three or more species in the ancestry of an Annona hybrid, it is best to simply call it an ANNONA HYBRID!  A cooked-up word, (just as "atemoya" is a cooked-up word), such as "Temoylata" could be used [for a (Sugar-Apple x Cherimoya) x Reticulata, but will always have to end up being explained, here.

All the best,
Guanabanus,  a.k.a. Har Mahdeem

Thanks for the clarifications Mr,Guanabanus. How cold tolerant are Custard Apple? Are they possible to do in Southern California zone 10B Sunset 24 in your experience?

JF

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Re: More Custard Apples Parkland FL
« Reply #16 on: March 01, 2012, 12:15:18 AM »
I'm not sure how Annona reticulata handles Santa Anna winds.  We don't get fierce dry winds here. 

Here in Florida, fruit quality is best when the trees still have most of their leaves through early spring.  When our dry season starts as early as November or January, they must be watered regularly to keep the leaves from dropping off.  Fruits that have hung on a leafless tree for three or more months do live up to the least complementary things said about this species.

A top-quality cream-and-strawberries, perfumy Reticulata is hard to beat in the spring.
Har

Felipe

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Re: More Custard Apples Parkland FL
« Reply #17 on: March 01, 2012, 06:55:09 AM »
Har, which is you favourite reticulata cultivar? Which would be your favourite annona?

Guanabanus

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Re: More Custard Apples Parkland FL
« Reply #18 on: March 01, 2012, 07:47:16 AM »
Felipe,
My favorite Reticulata is probably 'Canul', really liked 'Benque' too, but haven't had either in years.  I like most of them just fine.  I'd like to try that beautiful 'Fernandez,' of Lara Nursery, pictured in this forum.
Har

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Re: More Custard Apples Parkland FL
« Reply #19 on: March 02, 2012, 09:00:10 PM »
What are you doing to keep chalcid fly off your reticulatas? Almost every fruit here gets mummified, it's their favorite annona by far.
Oscar
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Re: More Custard Apples Parkland FL
« Reply #20 on: March 02, 2012, 09:10:49 PM »
We don't have as much of a problem with the chalcid fly here in Broward.
Jeff  :-)

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Re: More Custard Apples Parkland FL
« Reply #21 on: March 02, 2012, 09:34:44 PM »
I live in Zone 10b (or "c"?), where there hasn't been a freeze since 1989, and then just barely for 1/2 hour.  I don't recall too serious of damage on the custard-apples' larger branches in the more serious freezes in 1984 and 1987--- about 28 degrees for over an hour, if my memory serves me.

For Annona Seed Borers, bag the fruit--- when the fruit is the size of your pinkie fingernail.  Any bag will do, even if it is ripped:  the pest no longer recognizes the shape and just flies on by.  I have used curtain material and old pantyhoses, and I have heard of waxed paper bags too.  The bag must be big enough for the fruit to fill out in.  Of course tying a large bag onto the tiny fruit peduncle is not a good idea;  you must tie your twistie on the opposite side of the branch, with the fruit simply included in the bag.  If your fruit are already appreciably bigger than your pinkie fingernail, go ahead and bag themm anyway---  when the little bugers bore out, they will be trapped, and you may take pleasure in squishing them!
Har

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Re: More Custard Apples Parkland FL
« Reply #22 on: March 02, 2012, 09:38:21 PM »
I bagged some already, but obviously waited too long as they were already stung. Thanks for the advice.
Oscar
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Re: More Custard Apples Parkland FL
« Reply #23 on: March 03, 2012, 11:41:14 AM »
HAHAHAHAHA Good advice! Thanks!

I live in Zone 10b (or "c"?), where there hasn't been a freeze since 1989, and then just barely for 1/2 hour.  I don't recall too serious of damage on the custard-apples' larger branches in the more serious freezes in 1984 and 1987--- about 28 degrees for over an hour, if my memory serves me.

For Annona Seed Borers, bag the fruit--- when the fruit is the size of your pinkie fingernail.  Any bag will do, even if it is ripped:  the pest no longer recognizes the shape and just flies on by.  I have used curtain material and old pantyhoses, and I have heard of waxed paper bags too.  The bag must be big enough for the fruit to fill out in.  Of course tying a large bag onto the tiny fruit peduncle is not a good idea;  you must tie your twistie on the opposite side of the branch, with the fruit simply included in the bag.  If your fruit are already appreciably bigger than your pinkie fingernail, go ahead and bag themm anyway---  when the little bugers bore out, they will be trapped, and you may take pleasure in squishing them!
Jeff  :-)

 

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