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Author Topic: Mocambo / Pataxte (Theobroma bicolor)... When do I eat it?  (Read 392 times)

Caesar

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Mocambo / Pataxte (Theobroma bicolor)... When do I eat it?
« on: July 14, 2020, 03:30:54 PM »
My Mocambo tree set fruit for the first time at my Grandmother's house, and I've been waiting for it to ripen. I got some pics of the tree and its fruit over time:




Then a few days ago, I saw a branch had snapped under the weight of one of the fruits. My mother found them on the ground today and brought 'em home.



As can be seen in the pics, one is way too small, but even the bigger one seems under-sized. ŅWill they ripen properly, or will I have to wait more for my first taste? ŅAre the seeds likely to be viable? ŅWhen should I crack them open? There's no fruity smell, the skin just smells like raw green pigeon peas.

Luisport

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Re: Mocambo / Pataxte (Theobroma bicolor)... When do I eat it?
« Reply #1 on: July 14, 2020, 03:57:00 PM »
Congratulations my friend! This is a awsome achivement even if this fruit don't get matured.  ;D

Finca La Isla

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Re: Mocambo / Pataxte (Theobroma bicolor)... When do I eat it?
« Reply #2 on: July 14, 2020, 06:06:04 PM »
Are there more fruits on the tree?
Pataxte fruits fall on their own when they are ready.  At that point the fruit is yellow and could still wait a couple of days to ripen more.  They should smell and the shell needs to be cracked open.
I donít think anyone can say whether the fruit in the photos could be any good or the seeds be viable.
Suerte,
Peter

Caesar

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Re: Mocambo / Pataxte (Theobroma bicolor)... When do I eat it?
« Reply #3 on: July 14, 2020, 08:46:03 PM »
Congratulations my friend! This is a awsome achivement even if this fruit don't get matured.  ;D

Thank you Luis! I've been waiting a long time for this fruit... Would've had a shorter wait if I had stuck it kn the ground soon after arrival. Oh well, you go with what you can.  ;)


Are there more fruits on the tree?
Pataxte fruits fall on their own when they are ready.  At that point the fruit is yellow and could still wait a couple of days to ripen more.  They should smell and the shell needs to be cracked open.
I donít think anyone can say whether the fruit in the photos could be any good or the seeds be viable.
Suerte,
Peter

Thanks for the info. There's at least two more on the tree. I guess I'll wait for these two to turn yellow and smell. If they look like they're about to go bad instead, I'll crack 'em open then. Hopefully the tree will be able to handle the weight of the other two fruits.

Finca La Isla

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Re: Mocambo / Pataxte (Theobroma bicolor)... When do I eat it?
« Reply #4 on: July 14, 2020, 09:01:22 PM »
Itís unfortunate that the branch broke but, like I said, the fruits will drop naturally when ready.  That is the case with cupuasu as well but in the case of cacao you have to pick the fruit when itís ripe.  The pulp is tasty, we think, and the seeds will germinate readily if you plant them right away.  Donít let them dry out.  The dried seeds can be eaten as nuts but once dry canít germinate.
Saludos

pineislander

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Re: Mocambo / Pataxte (Theobroma bicolor)... When do I eat it?
« Reply #5 on: July 14, 2020, 09:16:49 PM »
Wow, that is a beautiful tree, very architectural! I have a few young ones here in Florida, only 2 feet tall but have some hope they might look so good some day.

Budtropicals

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Re: Mocambo / Pataxte (Theobroma bicolor)... When do I eat it?
« Reply #6 on: July 15, 2020, 12:22:08 PM »
If anyone is selling some i'd love to buy. 

These things are very beautiful.

New_Jungle

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Re: Mocambo / Pataxte (Theobroma bicolor)... When do I eat it?
« Reply #7 on: July 17, 2020, 02:45:19 PM »
Congrats! A couple questions, how old is your tree and do you only have one? Reason I ask is because I have one on my property but was wondering if I should put a couple more. Thanks!

Kyle
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HIfarm

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Re: Mocambo / Pataxte (Theobroma bicolor)... When do I eat it?
« Reply #8 on: July 17, 2020, 05:08:09 PM »
Congrats! A couple questions, how old is your tree and do you only have one? Reason I ask is because I have one on my property but was wondering if I should put a couple more. Thanks!

Kyle

It would probably be prudent to try the fruit before you plant more.  The smell of the fruit can be pretty assertive so it is not for everyone.  I've got a couple; it was probably about 5 years to bear in the Hilo area.

New_Jungle

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Re: Mocambo / Pataxte (Theobroma bicolor)... When do I eat it?
« Reply #9 on: July 17, 2020, 06:20:58 PM »
Congrats! A couple questions, how old is your tree and do you only have one? Reason I ask is because I have one on my property but was wondering if I should put a couple more. Thanks!

Kyle

It would probably be prudent to try the fruit before you plant more.  The smell of the fruit can be pretty assertive so it is not for everyone.  I've got a couple; it was probably about 5 years to bear in the Hilo area.

Thanks for the info and Iíll keep that in mind! Luckily itís toward the back of the property. Would you say the fruit is similar in flavor to cupuacu? Iíve got a few of those and love them!
The best time to plant a fruit tree was 20 years ago. The next best time to plant one is now.
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Finca La Isla

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Re: Mocambo / Pataxte (Theobroma bicolor)... When do I eat it?
« Reply #10 on: July 17, 2020, 06:44:50 PM »
I actually prefer it to cupuasu eaten directly from the fruit.  The dried seeds are good as a nut.
Pataxte is self fertile, you only need one.
Peter

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Re: Mocambo / Pataxte (Theobroma bicolor)... When do I eat it?
« Reply #11 on: July 17, 2020, 07:13:54 PM »
Congrats! Agree with everything Peter said. If the big one starts turning yellow, then it is ripening. Even if it doesn't probably seeds will be ok to germinate. In tropical climate the pods drop and if not gathered will start volunteer plants all around the mother trees. BTW to open it's easiest to crack them against a cement slab. They are very difficult to cut, but are brittle and crack open pretty easily.
Oscar

Budtropicals

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Re: Mocambo / Pataxte (Theobroma bicolor)... When do I eat it?
« Reply #12 on: July 17, 2020, 09:04:34 PM »
I would also like to know how old this tree is.

Caesar

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Re: Mocambo / Pataxte (Theobroma bicolor)... When do I eat it?
« Reply #13 on: August 05, 2020, 04:39:13 PM »
Apologies for the delay, it's been a couple of weeks since I opened the pods at the first sign of mold. Neither was ready. The little one had an almost vegetal taste to the pulp, and seeds that burst as liquid if you tried to open them. The bigger one had mild, flavorless pulp and jelly seeds. Both (especially the bigger one) had a strong soursop-like aroma with a potent and disagreeable chemical finish. I'm hoping the pulp of a fully-matured fruit will taste much better than what I had, and better than the aroma would indicate. I also hope that mature seeds have a proper, nut-like consistency and taste. There's still two big fruits left on the tree, so I still have a chance to taste it, and maybe get viable seeds.






Wow, that is a beautiful tree, very architectural! I have a few young ones here in Florida, only 2 feet tall but have some hope they might look so good some day.


It was a fast grower, so I think you won't have to wait long to get some nice-looking trees out of them.


If anyone is selling some i'd love to buy. 

These things are very beautiful.


Oscar was selling when last I checked, a couple of weeks ago. His website's currently closed, but it'll reopen on the 13th. Link: http://www.fruitlovers.com/seedlistUSA.html


Congrats! A couple questions, how old is your tree and do you only have one? Reason I ask is because I have one on my property but was wondering if I should put a couple more. Thanks!

Kyle


I only have one, and am not aware of anyone else having this species in my town. I'm a bit fuzzy on the age, maybe around 6 or 7 years? It spent just under half that time strangled in a 3 gallon pot, with its tip dying off and then re-sprouting at one point (plus a long tap-root that went through the bottom, requiring mounting the pot on some cinder blocks to prevent damage).


Congrats! A couple questions, how old is your tree and do you only have one? Reason I ask is because I have one on my property but was wondering if I should put a couple more. Thanks!

Kyle


It would probably be prudent to try the fruit before you plant more.  The smell of the fruit can be pretty assertive so it is not for everyone.  I've got a couple; it was probably about 5 years to bear in the Hilo area.


Assertive is putting it mildly. The soursop notes were fine, but the chemical smell was stinking up the kitchen after a while, so I promptly threw the fruit into the compost pile (not just 'cause of the smell, but 'cause it wasn't mature nor edible anyway). I didn't detect anything in the pulp's flavor that reminded me of the smell.


Congrats! Agree with everything Peter said. If the big one starts turning yellow, then it is ripening. Even if it doesn't probably seeds will be ok to germinate. In tropical climate the pods drop and if not gathered will start volunteer plants all around the mother trees. BTW to open it's easiest to crack them against a cement slab. They are very difficult to cut, but are brittle and crack open pretty easily.


Can't wait for the last fruits to drop. Volunteers probably won't be an issue, I'm a nut fiend! Either I plant 'em elsewhere, or I'll eat every last seed.

I actually managed to stick a big ol' kitchen knife into the pod's point and run the blade through the seams. ŅDo they get harder as the mature?

fruitlovers

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Re: Mocambo / Pataxte (Theobroma bicolor)... When do I eat it?
« Reply #14 on: Today at 01:26:29 AM »
Sounds like your pods didn't ripen properly. They usually fall on their own at right time, a bit greenish, and then start yellowing up after falling. The pods are extremely hard when properly ripened. Best is to ccack them against the edge of a cement slab. Crack them along the equator. You can also use a machete to crack along that same line.
Oscar

 

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