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Author Topic: Avocado 24/7 Thread  (Read 146733 times)

CTMIAMI

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #100 on: June 09, 2013, 10:48:33 PM »
Florida is exporting Waldin Avocado seeds to many places is the world as the preferred root stock in places with hard, high sodium water. I recently communicated  with a guy in Peru that was looking for thousand of Waldin seedsto use as root stock to Hass.
Carlos
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Zambezi

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #101 on: June 09, 2013, 11:29:57 PM »
Carlos and Mark,

Thank you for the information... I've hard well water as well, chlorinated. Soil is usual Texas black clay. I believe salt/sodium content is something I should look into to see if that might be a problem for me. I'll do some more digging around and try to figure out what I can plant for root stock.

:) Thanks again guys,

GT

Mark in Texas

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #102 on: June 10, 2013, 08:25:14 AM »
Carlos and Mark,

Thank you for the information... I've hard well water as well, chlorinated. Soil is usual Texas black clay. I believe salt/sodium content is something I should look into to see if that might be a problem for me. I'll do some more digging around and try to figure out what I can plant for root stock.

:) Thanks again guys,

GT


Carlos, heard from a local avocado grower that he has seen avocado trees growing in Cozumel where the salt water table was just below the surface.  I don't have to worry about Na, SAR, I have a ton of Mg and Ca bicarbs.

GT, send a water sample off to http://soiltesting.tamu.edu/  Everything is on that site - the forms, instructions, fees which are cheap for what you get.  Send water in a NEW bottle.  Might as well send a soil sample in the same box to save on postage.   :)

Mark

CTMIAMI

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #103 on: June 10, 2013, 09:10:12 AM »
Mark I wonder if the Cozumel Avocados are grafted or seedlings. Cozumel is not a big island with a perimeter road. If you run into this person try to get a general location, I may be on a cruise this summer stopping there.
Carlos
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LEOOEL

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #104 on: June 10, 2013, 11:40:53 PM »
Yamagata avocado is being promoted by serious nurseries as being the solution to the South Florida avocado void in the winter.

Sharwil avocado is slowly being distributed throughout the USA. So far, Mark in Texas, NullZero and others have mentioned that they have young/infant plants.
In order to learn about the time of year that Sharwil fruit ripens and its production, some time will have to pass. Sharwil has been around more than a decade, according to Oscar.

All this begs the question: Does anyone have an adult, producing, Sharwil or Yamagata avocado tree? If so, please be so kind as to give your Temperature Zone location and experience(s) with this/these cultivar(s), as this will help speed the adequate propagation of these varieties.
« Last Edit: June 11, 2013, 10:31:51 PM by LEOOEL »
'Virtue' should be taught, learned and propagated, in order to save others and oneself.

fruitlovers

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Re: The "Texas Sharwil"
« Reply #105 on: June 11, 2013, 03:16:52 AM »
Hey ya'll, here's mah "Texas Sharwil".  She was grafted March 2012 and is growing like a weed.  The huge size of the leaves is interesting, they just seem to be getting bigger, a good thang.  :)  Some are 10 1/2" long.  At the rate this thing is growing I expect fruit next year.  I'm especially proud of the graft as I've never done a veneer before.

Wish me luck!

Oscar, you're spot on.  CALAVO is one strong lobbying group.  Doesn't take much of a lie for the politicians (and Dept. of Ag.) to cave into their bullying.  What's amazing is how they fought Chile and Mexican fruit for so long and then finally gave in.   They now call those south of the border growers "my partners". Well, if the latino growers can be "partners", what's going on with the Hawaiians who indeed could supply tons of high quality cados?  Is the governor of Hawaii and his buds not doing their job?

Mark

Hi Mark, i don't know what's up with that. All i can tell you is that Hawaii seems to be last on the list for some unknown reason. USDA prefers to let in fruit from any Asian country into USA and then gives Hawaii a real hard time to send anything to continental USA. Ditto with the avocado scene. There is currently a second attempt to petition USDA to allow Hawaii Sharwils into rest of USA. Let's see if anything actually happens this time? Not holding my breath!
Oscar

Mark in Texas

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #106 on: June 11, 2013, 09:41:35 AM »
Mark I wonder if the Cozumel Avocados are grafted or seedlings. Cozumel is not a big island with a perimeter road. If you run into this person try to get a general location, I may be on a cruise this summer stopping there.


Carlos, you and Bill really need to hook up.  He grafts and sells Mexican avocados (Top Tropicals type) in Devine, TX, southwest of San Antonio.  He was the one telling me about his Cozumel experience.  They call him the "Avocado Man" and have a yearly town avocado festival.    http://www.austinchronicle.com/food/2008-08-01/653763/

Have fun!

Mark in Texas

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Re: The "Texas Sharwil"
« Reply #107 on: June 11, 2013, 09:47:43 AM »
Hi Mark, i don't know what's up with that. All i can tell you is that Hawaii seems to be last on the list for some unknown reason. USDA prefers to let in fruit from any Asian country into USA and then gives Hawaii a real hard time to send anything to continental USA. Ditto with the avocado scene. There is currently a second attempt to petition USDA to allow Hawaii Sharwils into rest of USA. Let's see if anything actually happens this time? Not holding my breath!

My guess is there's some petty politics at play.  I'd buy Hawaii fruit any time.  Guess you need to have the pull of Del Monte to get something done.  If they can flood the mainland market with pineapple, why not avocado?  Perhaps we should get that nice young, honest and powerful man involved - Eric Holder?   ;D

zands

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Re: The "Texas Sharwil"
« Reply #108 on: June 11, 2013, 11:58:12 AM »
Hi Mark, i don't know what's up with that. All i can tell you is that Hawaii seems to be last on the list for some unknown reason. USDA prefers to let in fruit from any Asian country into USA and then gives Hawaii a real hard time to send anything to continental USA. Ditto with the avocado scene. There is currently a second attempt to petition USDA to allow Hawaii Sharwils into rest of USA. Let's see if anything actually happens this time? Not holding my breath!


My guess is there's some petty politics at play.  I'd buy Hawaii fruit any time.  Guess you need to have the pull of Del Monte to get something done.  If they can flood the mainland market with pineapple, why not avocado?  Perhaps we should get that nice young, honest and powerful man involved - Eric Holder?   ;D


Dole no longer operates pineapple plantations in Hawaii except for one last one they have tours at. Central America is a huge pineapple producer now and undercuts what Dole can do on (expensive) Hawaii
http://courses.wcupa.edu/rbove/eco338/030Trade-debt/Commodities/031007pineap.txt

fruitlovers

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Re: The "Texas Sharwil"
« Reply #109 on: June 14, 2013, 02:06:27 AM »
Hi Mark, i don't know what's up with that. All i can tell you is that Hawaii seems to be last on the list for some unknown reason. USDA prefers to let in fruit from any Asian country into USA and then gives Hawaii a real hard time to send anything to continental USA. Ditto with the avocado scene. There is currently a second attempt to petition USDA to allow Hawaii Sharwils into rest of USA. Let's see if anything actually happens this time? Not holding my breath!

My guess is there's some petty politics at play.  I'd buy Hawaii fruit any time.  Guess you need to have the pull of Del Monte to get something done.  If they can flood the mainland market with pineapple, why not avocado?  Perhaps we should get that nice young, honest and powerful man involved - Eric Holder?   ;D

Yes i think you're right, we don't have a powerful corporation behind the growing of avocados so can't push the exportation to mainland US  through so easily. Zands is right that Hawaii is not a big pineapple grower any longer. But he's wrong about Central America. Most of the pineapples nowadays are grown in either Phillippines or Thailand. Dole is outsourced now, just like most big American companies. BTW, i think that  outsourcing trend started under republican watch...you can't blame Eric for that big blunder! But yes, it would be nice to have the feds on our side to influence the USDA bureaucracy into letting Hawaii avocados into the mainland US.
Oscar

zands

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Re: The "Texas Sharwil"
« Reply #110 on: June 14, 2013, 06:19:33 AM »
Hi Mark, i don't know what's up with that. All i can tell you is that Hawaii seems to be last on the list for some unknown reason. USDA prefers to let in fruit from any Asian country into USA and then gives Hawaii a real hard time to send anything to continental USA. Ditto with the avocado scene. There is currently a second attempt to petition USDA to allow Hawaii Sharwils into rest of USA. Let's see if anything actually happens this time? Not holding my breath!

My guess is there's some petty politics at play.  I'd buy Hawaii fruit any time.  Guess you need to have the pull of Del Monte to get something done.  If they can flood the mainland market with pineapple, why not avocado?  Perhaps we should get that nice young, honest and powerful man involved - Eric Holder?   ;D

Yes i think you're right, we don't have a powerful corporation behind the growing of avocados so can't push the exportation to mainland US  through so easily. Zands is right that Hawaii is not a big pineapple grower any longer. But he's wrong about Central America. Most of the pineapples nowadays are grown in either Philippines or Thailand. Dole is outsourced now, just like most big American companies. BTW, i think that  outsourcing trend started under republican watch...you can't blame Eric for that big blunder! But yes, it would be nice to have the feds on our side to influence the USDA bureaucracy into letting Hawaii avocados into the mainland US.

I am thinking you guys on the West Coast and Hawaii are getting pineapples from Philippines or Thailand as you mention while the East Coast and Florida where I am is getting the Central American pineapples which are vastly improved from what we (east Coast) used to get 20 years ago. We got these pale white un-ripe/never ripe Hawaii (I presume) pineapples. These days we get yellow fleshed and ripe or is at least destined to get nice and ripe from Central America. There are huge pineapple plantings in CentAmerica by the usual suspects, Dole and the others

LEOOEL

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #111 on: June 15, 2013, 02:13:18 AM »
Let me put this in this way, I'm getting a big itch for getting a grafted Lula avocado cultivar. Although I know it doesn't completly fill the avocado void that we have here in the South Florida winter, it does bridge the avocado season into the mango season. This is accomplished with the ripe fruit from a grafted Rosy-Gold mango tree.
At least, this is what happened this year. That is, when I picked the last Lula avocado fruit from a tree at a nearby fruit park in the beginning of March of this year, I was already eating mangos from my Rosy-Gold mango tree (March 1, 2013). Since the name of this thread is "Mango and/or Avocado 24/7," I believe the first goal of this thread, as suggested by this threads' namesake, has thus been accomplished, at least for this year. I guess I'll have to wait until next year to see if this same Lula-avocado and Rosy-Gold-mango 'bridge' happens again; very exciting.

By the way, two very late avocado cultivars in South Florida are Lula and Choquette. I'm gonna take an endulgement in expressing that I like to think of these two cultivars as being 'hellish' avocados, in the sense that:

Lula avocados, although of good eating quality, in my opinion, the exterior skin develops scab in the South Florida winter months of January, February and the beginning of March. The scab on the exterior of the fruit 'does not' affect the edible 'fruit-meat' on the inside, in my opinion/observations. Also, another positive thing about this cultivar is, that its seedling make a great rootstock!

Choquette avocados, I've noticed are very famous at ripening very late in the avocado (South Florida winter) season. But, the scab/problem on the exterior or the fruit, 'does' affect the 'fruit-meat' inside the avocado. This, therefore, considerably affects the eating quality of this cultivar. Thus, I then think of it as being more 'hellish' than the Lula avocado.

So, this is why I find myself being very attracted to the Lula avocado; and about buying one tree and planting it.

I think I should let it be known that I for one am still, very much, searching for an avocado cultivar that'll fill the S. Fla. winter avocado void.
As soon as it's found, with the important help of Carlos and others, I plan to purchase the tree and plant it (if it's not patented).
It's just that I find myself growing very fond of this Lula avocado variety. And, feeling that I'm being left behind, every time I read, in this forum, that a member has just gotten a potted, young, Lula avocado tree. It's like, I can't take it anymore, I've gotta get this tree.
« Last Edit: June 15, 2013, 11:00:47 AM by LEOOEL »
'Virtue' should be taught, learned and propagated, in order to save others and oneself.

zands

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #112 on: June 15, 2013, 08:13:19 AM »
LEOOEL----

bsbulie likes lula a lot and so do I. It has high enough oil content. The fruits are not huge. I have a small one in a pot so far. A neighbor has a reliable lula tree that has lots of small fruits developing right now. I have eaten many lula from that tree. Go buy a 7-gallon so you get off to a good start

Lula is winter avocado and winter is when you like more heavy and oily food like the lula avocado

Mark in Texas

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #113 on: June 15, 2013, 09:22:08 AM »
LEOOEL----

bsbulie likes lula a lot and so do I. It has high enough oil content. The fruits are not huge. I have a small one in a pot so far. A neighbor has a reliable lula tree that has lots of small fruits developing right now. I have eaten many lula from that tree. Go buy a 7-gallon so you get off to a good start

Lula is winter avocado and winter is when you like more heavy and oily food like the lula avocado

Lula is and has been grown commercially in the valley (far south Texas) for some time.  It does well in hot weather climes which they have.  It's also used by Texas nurserymen as a rootstock.

Mark

johnb51

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #114 on: June 15, 2013, 10:09:09 AM »
I've come to have a high opinion of Lula also with its extended ripening period and very good flavor.  I now wish I had planted it instead of Oro Negro, but I bought into the O.N. hype!  Can somebody please top-work a tree for me?  (I wish I knew how.)
John

LEOOEL

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #115 on: June 15, 2013, 11:05:31 AM »
Hey guys, thank you for all the helpful suggestions and encouragement. I'm now all giddy with excitement about getting a Lula avocado tree.
'Virtue' should be taught, learned and propagated, in order to save others and oneself.

zands

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #116 on: June 15, 2013, 11:59:21 AM »
Hey guys, thank you for all the helpful suggestions and encouragement. I'm now all giddy with excitement about getting a Lula avocado tree.

Let us know where you got it from when you plant it

Bananimal

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #117 on: June 16, 2013, 07:50:58 AM »
dupl post
« Last Edit: June 25, 2013, 01:18:23 AM by Bananimal »
Dan

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #118 on: June 16, 2013, 08:00:35 AM »
Let me put this in this way, I'm getting a big itch for getting a grafted Lula avocado cultivar. Although I know it doesn't completly fill the avocado void that we have here in the South Florida winter, it does bridge the avocado season into the mango season. This is accomplished with the ripe fruit from a grafted Rosy-Gold mango tree.
At least, this is what happened this year. That is, when I picked the last Lula avocado fruit from a tree at a nearby fruit park in the beginning of March of this year, I was already eating mangos from my Rosy-Gold mango tree (March 1, 2013). Since the name of this thread is "Mango and/or Avocado 24/7," I believe the first goal of this thread, as suggested by this threads' namesake, has thus been accomplished, at least for this year. I guess I'll have to wait until next year to see if this same Lula-avocado and Rosy-Gold-mango 'bridge' happens again; very exciting.

By the way, two very late avocado cultivars in South Florida are Lula and Choquette. I'm gonna take an endulgement in expressing that I like to think of these two cultivars as being 'hellish' avocados, in the sense that:

Lula avocados, although of good eating quality, in my opinion, the exterior skin develops scab in the South Florida winter months of January, February and the beginning of March. The scab on the exterior of the fruit 'does not' affect the edible 'fruit-meat' on the inside, in my opinion/observations. Also, another positive thing about this cultivar is, that its seedling make a great rootstock!

Choquette avocados, I've noticed are very famous at ripening very late in the avocado (South Florida winter) season. But, the scab/problem on the exterior or the fruit, 'does' affect the 'fruit-meat' inside the avocado. This, therefore, considerably affects the eating quality of this cultivar. Thus, I then think of it as being more 'hellish' than the Lula avocado.

So, this is why I find myself being very attracted to the Lula avocado; and about buying one tree and planting it.

I think I should let it be known that I for one am still, very much, searching for an avocado cultivar that'll fill the S. Fla. winter avocado void.
As soon as it's found, with the important help of Carlos and others, I plan to purchase the tree and plant it (if it's not patented).
It's just that I find myself growing very fond of this Lula avocado variety. And, feeling that I'm being left behind, every time I read, in this forum, that a member has just gotten a potted, young, Lula avocado tree. It's like, I can't take it anymore, I've gotta get this tree.


You gotta get a Lula.  Check out the pic - tree is 10 ft tall.  Holding lots of fruit.





Dan

LEOOEL

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #119 on: June 16, 2013, 08:15:18 PM »
Hey guys, thank you for all the helpful suggestions and encouragement. I'm now all giddy with excitement about getting a Lula avocado tree.

Let us know where you got it from when you plant it

Will do Zands. I already know where I'll be getting it from, but as you said, I'll let you know after I plant it.
I really like your idea of a seven gallon Lula, since the 'hellish' ( ;D) location that I have in mind for it, requires a tall plant.
'Virtue' should be taught, learned and propagated, in order to save others and oneself.

LEOOEL

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #120 on: June 16, 2013, 08:21:41 PM »
Bananimal, thank you for the encouraging words and pictures.

Those Lula avocado pictures are sights for sore eyes, beautiful, nice job.

Full disclosure: several years back I wasn't such a fan of avocados. But now, I just wanna have wacamole everyday.
I wonder if this is the main reason why this fruit has gained such popularity.
'Virtue' should be taught, learned and propagated, in order to save others and oneself.

LEOOEL

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #121 on: June 23, 2013, 09:44:59 PM »
Carlos, or anyone else, do you think it's possible that one of these California avocados can be candidates to fill the S. FL avocado void (March - May)?

These are some of the avocado cultivars that I was able to put together, as potential candidates for producing ripe fruit in the South Florida winters.
Or, more specifically, for producing ripe avocados in the South Florida avocado void months of March through May. Most, if not all, are winter California avocados.

Cultivars:

Bacon,  Zutano, Santana, Fuerte, Ettinger and Mexicola Grande.
« Last Edit: June 24, 2013, 01:10:07 AM by LEOOEL »
'Virtue' should be taught, learned and propagated, in order to save others and oneself.

CTMIAMI

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #122 on: June 23, 2013, 10:05:32 PM »
Cross out Beacon and Mexicola Grande. They are early here.
 
The time these mature in California are totally different in So. Florida.  I have Fuerte growing now  we wound know maybe next year.

This has posibilities http://www.myavocadotrees.com/don-carlos-avocado.html  but may be an alternate bearer.
Carlos
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LEOOEL

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #123 on: June 24, 2013, 01:37:24 AM »
Carlos, OK, that leaves the following,

California winter avocados that are potential candidates to fill the S. FL winter avocado void (March - May):

'Zutano', 'Santana', 'Fuerte' and 'Ettinger'

If someone is growing these avocado cultivars in Florida, it would be really appreciated if they could step up and please comment on their experiences with them.

By the way Carlos, that Don Carlito (nice name  :) ) has some wonderful qualities, as you've mentioned. It would really be nice if it was a reliable yearly producer of fruit.
In that way, you would have finally found the first, sought after, quality avocado cultivar that significantly fills the S. FL winter avocado void.

Whatever the case, I'd like to congratulate you and say good job Carlos, you're/we're close, I can feel it.
« Last Edit: June 24, 2013, 01:40:02 AM by LEOOEL »
'Virtue' should be taught, learned and propagated, in order to save others and oneself.

CTMIAMI

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Re: Mango and/or Avocado 24/7
« Reply #124 on: June 24, 2013, 07:36:55 PM »
You may want to add Winter Mexican to the list. I order one from Top Tropicals but arrived cooked. I think WM will mature around March-April.
Carlos
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