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Author Topic: Manilita Mango  (Read 14560 times)

ben mango

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Re: Manilita Mango
« Reply #25 on: June 15, 2014, 04:59:28 PM »
Perennial peanut seems to be the best ground cover

sunworshiper

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Re: Manilita Mango
« Reply #26 on: June 15, 2014, 06:48:57 PM »
Thanks all! Here's a picture of it today. Can't wait for all those fruit to ripen!



bsbullie - If you use Manilita as the rootstock, does it dwarf what you graft onto it? The fruit is small, but so is the tree, which is a plus for me since I have to protect from cold in winter. In fact, if you look close at the picture, you'll see the xmas lights are still on there. Was still getting cold when the fruit was pea sized, so decided just to leave the lights up until after harvest.

zands - They are the earliest one I have here in central FL too. Good luck sprouting some seedlings!

puglvr1

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Re: Manilita Mango
« Reply #27 on: June 16, 2014, 07:22:22 AM »

What a great producer! A real work horse!! Looks like all your work in the winter is gonna pay off  ;D
Beautiful tree Sun!

sunworshiper

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Re: Manilita Mango
« Reply #28 on: June 16, 2014, 07:35:08 AM »
Thanks puglvr! Sure helped to have a mild winter! My cogshall didn't fruit this year, pugged it last year to make a better shape, it had gotten too tall for me to protect. It is shaping up nicely this year. My Pickering is holding about 8 fruit - it is it'd second year fruiting. And my Angie mango has 5 fruit! Can't wait to taste that one! It is the one that was severely damaged by cold a couple years ago. Finally it has recovered. It's a good fruit year!

zands

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Re: Manilita Mango
« Reply #29 on: June 16, 2014, 07:54:03 AM »
SunW-
You are doing a good job of keeping your perennial peanut free of grass. I have grass roots and seeds always invading my perennial peanut patches. I would not worry about the opposite. Perennial peanut cannot endure close cutting done on lawn grass- St Augustine. That's how it seems to me. Plus their little yellow flowers look OK if a few are poking up on a grass lawn

As an aside-- When I spoke with Mike Bender 2 months ago I flat out asked which mango tree would give him fruit first in 2014. He said Manilita and pointed to his tree. Manilita seems to mean small Manilla-Philippine background mango. So should be poly-embryonic because Philippine mangoes fall under the family of SE Asian derived mango not Indian-Pakistan derived. For obvious reason of proximity
« Last Edit: June 16, 2014, 01:24:17 PM by zands »

bsbullie

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Re: Manilita Mango
« Reply #30 on: June 16, 2014, 10:47:55 AM »
SunW-
You are doing a good job of keeping your perennial peanut free of grass. I have grass roots and seeds always invading my perennial peanut patches. I would not worry about the opposite. Perennial peanut cannot endure close cutting done on lawn grass- St Augustine. That's how it seems to me. Plus their little yellow flowers look OK if a few are poking up on a grass lawn

As an aside-- When I spoke with Mike Bender 2 months ago I flat out asked which mango tree would give him fruit first in 2014. He said Manilita and pointed to his tree. Manilita seems to mean small Manilla-Philippine background mango. So should be poly-embryonic because Philippine mangoes fall under the family of SE derived mango not Indian-Pakistan derived. For obvious reason of proximity

You are correct.
- Rob

bsbullie

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Re: Manilita Mango
« Reply #31 on: June 16, 2014, 10:51:08 AM »
I would not run out to plant this, early bearer or not.  The fruit are extremely small, smaller than a PPK.  You do not get much to eat off of each fruit.  If you want a "similar" fruit (in productivity and size) I would go with either Philippine or the much better Okrung.

If you are in SFla and are considering this due to its early season production, I would highly recommend Dupius (or Dupius Saigon as it is also known by).
- Rob

natsgarden123

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Re: Manilita Mango
« Reply #32 on: June 16, 2014, 11:11:15 AM »
I would not run out to plant this, early bearer or not.  The fruit are extremely small, smaller than a PPK.  You do not get much to eat off of each fruit.  If you want a "similar" fruit (in productivity and size) I would go with either Philippine or the much better Okrung.

If you are in SFla and are considering this due to its early season production, I would highly recommend Dupius (or Dupius Saigon as it is also known by).

wow you must be in a good mood  :)

Dupuis ( Saigon) is delicious (its been a vigorous grower in my yard) , Phillipine isnt great, at least the ones Ive had.

Sun Worshiper --  Really Nice Tree though - its really close to the house - lookd like it might be easier than many others, to control

bsbullie

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Re: Manilita Mango
« Reply #33 on: June 16, 2014, 12:16:23 PM »
Honesty is the best policy :)

Would also receommend PPK/Lemon Meringue for an early season variety.
- Rob

sunworshiper

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Re: Manilita Mango
« Reply #34 on: June 16, 2014, 12:42:37 PM »
I selected my mango trees based foremost on tree size and a flavor profile I like. Essentially, I went to the Fairchild festival and picked based on tree size from their offerings. Manilita had no info available in it it other than Fairchild's description, so took a chance. I knew where the tree was going to be planted, so the very narrow shape it can be maintained in is great. Fruit are a bit on the small side, but for me, 30 small fruit are much better than zero large fruit if the tree gets too big to frost protect. So while it might not be a top choice in s fl, I'm not disappointed. Also, it is a beautifully shaped tree, I've done very little to shape it  just grows with a nice shape. So that is also a benefit for me since it is in my front yard in an hoa controlled neighborhood.

Bsbullie, still curious to know if using manilita as the root stock passes on the small size to what you graft to it?

Perennial peanut comes in 2 forms. The one that I have grows from risomes, and even if killed to the ground by frost, comes back fine, I mow it ti the ground each spring, do some weeding, and that's really it for the year. The other variety spreads by above ground stolons, and is not so tolerant of mowing down, and seems less dense and more prone to weeds.

Dexter_FTG

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Re: Manilita Mango
« Reply #35 on: June 16, 2014, 01:08:11 PM »
Manilita is a yummy mango!  >:(  I like the different pinkish blush they have and the unique flavor they have. Little mangos need love too! 8)
Mango: the other white meat

bsbullie

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Re: Manilita Mango
« Reply #36 on: June 16, 2014, 01:09:08 PM »
Sun - Different rootstocks have different effects on certain varieties.  Can be a trial and error so its not used as a blanket rootstock for all varieties like a turpentine is used.
- Rob

BENDERSGROVE

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Re: Manilita Mango
« Reply #37 on: June 16, 2014, 05:13:32 PM »
Manilita is one of my earliest mangoes here in Davie, while their are many better and bigger fruit available I have a growing fan base that loves this little mango, it's sweet and perfect for a little refreshing snack when not in The mood to devour a large mango by yourself,
The tree is compact and I think would make a great container tree. My 2 cents.

sunworshiper

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Re: Manilita Mango
« Reply #38 on: June 17, 2014, 07:31:44 AM »
Dexter, I agree about the color they are very pretty!

Zands, I too think it would be a very good container tree, not prone to what I call monsterism, that is growing wildly out of bounds. And the fruit are a great small snack size! I know what you mean about the really big mangos being too much sometimes. The Pickering has such an intense flavor and are so big that I try to share it with someone, because it hate to crack one open and not be able to eat it all at once.

Another interesting thing about the small size is I think it contributes to them not being stolen from my front yard - people don't think they are full grown yet! They blush really fast just as they ripen, go from green to colored in only a day or two, so if I watch carefully I can pick them off as they color without them drawing attention from people passing by.

Thanks for the info on rootstocks bsbullie. If only it were that easy - use the right rootstock, and you could have any variety on a small tree.

zands

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Re: Manilita Mango
« Reply #39 on: June 17, 2014, 08:17:33 AM »


Perennial peanut comes in 2 forms. The one that I have grows from risomes, and even if killed to the ground by frost, comes back fine, I mow it ti the ground each spring, do some weeding, and that's really it for the year. The other variety spreads by above ground stolons, and is not so tolerant of mowing down, and seems less dense and more prone to weeds.

Hi
Mine seems to be the underground type but it will also root in and spread above it can. But 90% is spreading underground. So I seem to have the more desirable type!  I got mine started from perennial peanut from the back yard of someone who got his from Bill Whitman's place (Miami) about 2001-2003 and propagated it all over his back yard from a few small samples. He was on a tour with other rare fruit people and was told he could take some if he wanted

HMHausman

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Re: Manilita Mango
« Reply #40 on: June 23, 2014, 01:49:35 PM »
Manilita is one of my earliest mangoes here in Davie, while their are many better and bigger fruit available I have a growing fan base that loves this little mango, it's sweet and perfect for a little refreshing snack when not in The mood to devour a large mango by yourself,
The tree is compact and I think would make a great container tree. My 2 cents.

And when, pray tell, might that be?
Harry
Fort Lauderdale, FL 
USA

sunworshiper

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Re: Manilita Mango
« Reply #41 on: June 27, 2014, 01:00:37 PM »
Cool story to go with your peanut Zands!

So far I've eaten 3 of the Manilitas from my tree. Ranging from 5-9oz in size. The first one was slightly under ripe, the second over, and today's was just right:) This year I taste no coconut in the flavor profile, it is a very simple mango flavor. They are a bit on the tart side (which I enjoy). It was quite tasty. I let the second one ripen on the counter an extra day, and while it got a bit sweeter, it also got too mushy by the seed for my liking. So I think last year's analysis holds - not top tier flavor, but worth growing if you need a tree that stays small.

It is also making a good front yard tree. The small fruit size would make people think they aren't ripe yet, and they stay green until literally the day to pick them. The one I ate today at perfect ripeness was not showing any color at all until yesterday evening, and was fully colored and ripe for lunch today.

rbody2

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Re: Manilita Mango
« Reply #42 on: June 27, 2014, 09:34:26 PM »
Great looking tree...love the shape.

Intense how?


The Pickering has such an intense flavor and are so big that I try to share it with someone, because it hate to crack one open and not be able to eat it all at once.




sunworshiper

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Re: Manilita Mango
« Reply #43 on: June 27, 2014, 10:00:53 PM »
Intense...let's see, hard to describe flavor, but I'll give it a go. Pickering is the sweetest mango I've ever tasted. It's like how a spoonful of syrup is delicious, but drinking a glass of syrup would just be overwhelming. Kind of like that. A small portion is excellent, but I hit saturation before I've eaten the whole fruit. Check out the size!

Last year's pic, but that's a quart size jug I was using to protect the fruit from raccoons. Pickering is a top tier mango for sure, but I can't eat a whole one at one time in the same way I can't drink a quart of syrup at a time:)

bsbullie

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Re: Manilita Mango
« Reply #44 on: June 28, 2014, 06:34:45 AM »
I would not in any way describe Pickering as intense in flavor.   It must be let to get fully ripe for its sweetness and true flavor to come out.  To start with, never pick a Pickering with any green on it.  They should have a full yellow/orange coloration to the skin before they are picked.  Then let them sit till the color deepens, they will have an odd spotty rosy coloring and almost at tgeir best when they get some black spotting on them.  If let get to this stsge, theyvwill have good sweetness with what some perceive as a slight coconutty taste.  They are a firmer mango, not real creamy as they do have some unobjectionable fiber.

Sorry Sun but the Pickering in the picture above is not ripe (it was not ready to be picked).
« Last Edit: June 28, 2014, 06:38:28 AM by bsbullie »
- Rob

bsbullie

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Re: Manilita Mango
« Reply #45 on: June 28, 2014, 06:36:36 AM »
.
« Last Edit: June 28, 2014, 06:39:26 AM by bsbullie »
- Rob

sunworshiper

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Re: Manilita Mango
« Reply #46 on: June 28, 2014, 07:15:03 AM »
I'll have to go search for some Pics of others pickerings to compare. I had been suspicious before that my tree may not be a Pickering. No other pics handy, but that fruit was perfectly ripened. It was not yellow outside, and none of its 4 fruit were. It was very coconutty in flavor, very dark orange inside. The tree is my smallest, growth habit looks right. What do you think Rob? Pickering, or mystery?

bsbullie

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Re: Manilita Mango
« Reply #47 on: June 28, 2014, 07:25:17 AM »
Here is a Pickering just after picking.   Will try and post more pictures tomorrow.



- Rob

zands

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Re: Manilita Mango
« Reply #48 on: June 28, 2014, 07:27:16 AM »
Cool story to go with your peanut Zands!


Here are some  photos of perennial peanut creeping up to a gold nugget mango tree. I have some other patches too. I have to eliminate the grass within it to make it look nicer as a 100% ground cover within this patch. People can PM me if they want perennial peanut. From cuttings I can make up 25-50 transplant cups-pots to get them started. Have to charge for them :) 

It took me a few experiments to find out the best way to propagate it from cuttings.







« Last Edit: June 28, 2014, 07:33:54 AM by zands »

zands

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Re: Manilita Mango
« Reply #49 on: June 28, 2014, 07:31:05 AM »
Here is a Pickering just after picking.   Will try and post more pictures tomorrow.





I did not plan it this way but I took all fruits off my 6' x 6' Pickering and it is growing a lot faster this year.  It has that bushy Pickering habit.
Very good tasting mango...I agree with others on this.

 

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