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Author Topic: guanabana  (Read 12120 times)

phucvu

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guanabana
« on: January 20, 2012, 01:20:17 AM »

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Re: guanabana
« Reply #1 on: January 20, 2012, 11:30:50 AM »
Without a greenhouse, I don't think the guanabana would be happy in socal. They are not fond of temps below the low 40's.

Jeff
Jeff  :-)

Tim

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Re: guanabana
« Reply #2 on: January 20, 2012, 11:53:26 AM »
yea, it's a bit sensitive to the cold.  I forgot to bring my 12" seedling inside, it croaked with those early cold snaps in December  :'(   
Tim

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Re: guanabana
« Reply #3 on: January 20, 2012, 10:52:33 PM »
Jeff and Tim are correct: mine, at about a foot tall, dropped all leaves when the cold hit some time last month.  :( Those were pretty large leaves too. Since I brought it inside the greenhouse, new leaves have started. I don't know why I'm keeping this plant, it can't stand outdoors in the winter,and I'm not sure it can fruit in a container. Or can it? However, the leaves have a very nice, distinctive fragrance to them.  :)

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Re: guanabana
« Reply #4 on: January 20, 2012, 11:10:24 PM »
I have heard of stories of a fruiting guanabana in Santa Ana but I seriously doubt it. From all indications they will wilt and never recover in our winter if you put them in the ground.

JF

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Re: guanabana
« Reply #5 on: January 21, 2012, 03:10:34 AM »
I'm not sure it can fruit in a container. Or can it?

CRFG ran an article about a gentleman in Moscow who fruited a guanabana in a container and a member on yahoo recently fruited his in a container so go for it!  Tracking down a grafted one might make it easier.

-Ethan

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Re: guanabana
« Reply #6 on: January 21, 2012, 03:19:30 AM »
I agree with Ethan, a potted guanabana could be fruited in Southern Cal if grown in a pot and brought indoors or greenhouse when it got below 55 or so degrees fahrenheit. It's kinda difficult to find grafted guanabanas because they fruit rather fast and are fairly true from seed.
BTW, i like the spanish name "guanabana" a lot better than soursop, which i think is kind of a turnoff name for this fruit.
Oscar
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Re: guanabana
« Reply #7 on: January 21, 2012, 10:57:02 AM »
I agree with Ethan, a potted guanabana could be fruited in Southern Cal if grown in a pot and brought indoors or greenhouse when it got below 55 or so degrees fahrenheit. It's kinda difficult to find grafted guanabanas because they fruit rather fast and are fairly true from seed.
BTW, i like the spanish name "guanabana" a lot better than soursop, which i think is kind of a turnoff name for this fruit.
Oscar

I agree with Ethan. Guanabana sounds much better than Soursop. "Soursop" kinda gives a false representation like "lemon zest" mango.
Alexi

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Re: guanabana
« Reply #8 on: January 21, 2012, 01:33:29 PM »
Very nice looking fruit, Adam.  jealous actually ...
Did you grow your tree from seed or grafted?  I'm willing to give it another try, just have to baby it :)
Tim

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Re: guanabana
« Reply #9 on: January 21, 2012, 01:41:24 PM »
Adam:

How was the fiber content of your fruit.  I am not a big fan of seedy fruits and fiberous fruits are not that far behind on my list of prefer not to wrangle with fruits.  I have had trees that were supposedly seedlless (from Excalibur) and a fiberless one (also from Excalibur) to try to avoid my aversions.  The seedless one also turned out to be fruitless (and thus was not mis-represented, I guess in a way). It fruited one time in the 17 years I had it.  The fruits never matured fully dropping off at about half maturity. It died last year in our record cold waves that we encountered in the previous two years.   The allegedly fiberless has not fruited as of yet.  So the jury is still out.  My luck....the fiberless tree will either also be fruitless or the fruits will be tasteless.

Harry
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Re: guanabana
« Reply #10 on: January 21, 2012, 01:44:45 PM »
Tim,

Now you have the idea!!  Thanks!

BABY THAT bad mamajama!  They grow so fast from seed, should only really take 3-4yrs to start fruiting, mine had weather set backs each year, of some form.

They don't pollinate well either, my  tree made maybe 20 flowers before setting fruit.

BE WARNED

You will feel sick inside when temps dip for first time of winter (55F) just like your baby!! I am now more sensitive to cold, because I care about the guanabana so much...I've never hated cold temps so much before growing this tree to fruition.

But when she fruits for you, it will be glorious.

Adam

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Re: guanabana
« Reply #11 on: January 21, 2012, 01:48:12 PM »
Harvey,

This fruit had fiber, just like the ones used for juicing.  It was good eating to me though, tasting like Mountain Dew with a  Bubble Gum aroma.

Fibrous, but not stick in your teeth fiber, very soft and easy....good for bowels I'm sure.

Adam

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Re: guanabana
« Reply #12 on: January 21, 2012, 02:06:24 PM »
I fruited mine this year in Winter Park, FL 32789

Tree came from seed of a fruit I bought in 2007 at Robert is Here in Homestead FL.

In a 25 gal pot, despite dropping many leaves, and having no heated greenhouse, just plastic covering...with holes even.

This winter was mild, so I got lucky, also with timing of fruit set.

It took 4yrs and some change to get it done...the fruit was very very nice!  I still have about 1lb frozen of the 2.5lb fruit.

Here is a picture of the fruit cut up to eat...it was one for juicing, but we ate it right up... ;D

I also have seedling trees (12-18in in 4inch pot, way too tall!) if anyone is interested in purchase/trade...seeds were obtained from www.fruitlovers.com

Adam






Nice! Your guanabana's look pretty smooth like a mountain soursop. I guess it depends on the variety when it comes to the size of the spikes. I'm growing one now in-ground, which is as tall as your 25 gallon soursop, but the trunk is a bit skinnier.  Here's an image of a guanabana with larger spikes.




« Last Edit: December 09, 2012, 12:35:45 PM by Tim »
Alexi

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Re: guanabana
« Reply #13 on: January 21, 2012, 02:18:19 PM »
That's a good point, Alexi.  Adam's fruits do have a look like A. montana and do not look like the conventional A. muricata...not at least like the ones I have seen.  Adam....was the fruit you got at Robert's similarly formed...without spikes?  I wonder where they got their fruit from.....any idea?

Harry
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Re: guanabana
« Reply #14 on: January 21, 2012, 02:32:16 PM »
Wow Adam, that's a great accomplishment!  :)
 I will give this a try, I can keep the temp above 55 f in my garage. Did you have to change the soil in your 25-gallon container at all during the 4 years that it took to get fruits? 4 years sound like a long time to use the same soil.
Thanks,

FloridaGreenMan

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Re: guanabana
« Reply #15 on: January 21, 2012, 07:59:03 PM »
There are Guanabanas out there that area s sweet as a sugar apple. I tried one that was grown in Puerto Rico by Robin Philips that was super sweet with no tartness at all. The thing was that not all the fruit on the same tree were sweet, only some of them. Not sure why this was. It was really amazing!       
FloridaGreenMan

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Re: guanabana
« Reply #16 on: January 21, 2012, 08:03:01 PM »
Congrats Adam, always happy to see what can be done with potted plants.  It gives me hope.

cheers,
-Ethan

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Re: guanabana
« Reply #17 on: January 21, 2012, 09:00:25 PM »
I'm sure it wasn't montana,

the flowers and leaves are much different, also the fruits themselves...this one just happens to have a smoother texture when fully ripe  here is a picture of the younger fruit...and flower...

I had to up size the pot about once a year, adding soil each time...so it never just sat in the same soil for more than one year. or so.

Mountain soursop is much more cold hearty, and I would have had an easier time fruiting A montana.  Mine stopped flowering and dropped leaves with the first exposure to 55F, with cold dry wind approaching and encroaching.

The guanabana is highly variable as to shape, size, fiber content and sweetness/acid balance.

Mine is very large fruited (considering I got a 2.5lb fruit from a 25 gal tree, and it was first fruit)  They reach about 4-7lbs max when grown in the ground...the one I got the seed out of was about 3.5lbs....great for juice, but I love to just eat them and juice with my teeth.

Adam







Do you have any photos of the tree in your 25-gallon container? What's the diameter of the pot? I'm trying to plan for the future (since mine is only about 12" tall  :D at this time).
Thanks,

NewGen

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Re: guanabana
« Reply #18 on: January 21, 2012, 10:54:13 PM »
Adam,
That's very cool you're able to fruit guanabana in containers. ;) what state are you in?

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Re: guanabana
« Reply #19 on: January 21, 2012, 11:41:14 PM »
32804 FL

Way far North of where they usually grow them in ground...

All of them in ground got hammered these past few cold winters, so only a fool like me who  had one in a pot got to eat the fruits!  I'm sure some had fruits in ground and pots to, but didn't document it, because its really no big deal to them.

To me it was!

I'm going to greenhouse the tree now, and prune it back some 18inches

Adam

« Last Edit: December 09, 2012, 12:12:28 PM by ASaffron »

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Re: guanabana
« Reply #20 on: January 22, 2012, 03:03:00 AM »
Hi Harry, you would like the Whitman fiberless guanabana, it is totally fiberless and an incredibly good fruit. Leaves regular soursop in the dust! Because of lack of fiber really tastes like a totally different fruit. The bad news is that it is very shy bearing, at least for me. Maybe with hand pollination i could coax it to produce more fruits. I'm not the type to usually get around to doing such things, but for this fruit it would be well worth the effort. I give it a 10. The leaves have an unusual silvery green color and easy to tell apart from fibruous guanabana.
BTW Adam, the mountain soursop is usually quite terrible tasting, although i've heard there are some edible ones out there, i've never run across them.
Oscar
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Re: guanabana
« Reply #21 on: January 22, 2012, 07:47:49 AM »
Thanks, Oscar.  I am not positive that what I bought from Excalibur is the Whitman Fiberless....but from your description, I sure hope it is.  Murahilin or Rob, next time you guys are up there, could you ask Richard whether it is or isn't?  Thanks.  The best guanabana that I have previously had was from Noel (FloridaGreenMan).  It had fiber but was large (like all of his creations) and had a great flavor. I think the tree died from hurricanes or cold or both. You mention shy bearing......well, at this point I'll be happy to settle for some shyness........just not complete "barrenness."

Harry
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Re: guanabana
« Reply #22 on: January 22, 2012, 08:27:28 AM »
I have a well established guanabana, and I feel Harry's frustration.  I have no Idea regarding it's variety, etc. 

It was planted by the previous homeowner (I moved in in June 2004) , and it fruited big time pre hurricane Wilma(Oct 2005).  30 plus very large fruit, maybe up to 10 lbs.  This was before I knew anything about tropical fruit, and I had no idea what to do with it.  I ate some, and wasted a lot in my naivety.  I remember it being of a sweet/tart flavor, having a moderate amount of seeds, and fairly fiberless.  I assumed it would have heavy production annually.  Boy was I wrong.....

Zero fruit since Wilma.  Maybe I'm not taking care of it well, or maybe it's just the weather patterns holding it back.  Regardless, I have hope that someday it will fruit again..


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Re: guanabana
« Reply #23 on: January 22, 2012, 08:49:01 AM »
I hand pollinate most annonas but have had zero success with Guanabana. Just a difficult one.
FloridaGreenMan

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Re: guanabana
« Reply #24 on: January 22, 2012, 04:50:37 PM »
Forgot to say before, the reason Adam's soursop looks so different from the other soursop photo is that Adam's is totally ripe and the other is totally green. The unripe fruits on the tree have very hard splinterns sticking out. Once it ripens they become soft and bend easily, sometimes break off.
Oscar
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