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Author Topic: Vining fruits-What can you think of?  (Read 7400 times)

mikesid

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Vining fruits-What can you think of?
« on: July 03, 2013, 03:00:11 PM »
I really like the look of vines growing up my house and want to try to compile a list of vining fruits to try...so far I have passion fruit and dragon fruit doin a good job...what else can you think of?

Droshi

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Re: Vining fruits-What can you think of?
« Reply #1 on: July 03, 2013, 03:15:02 PM »
Grapes and kiwi...that I can think of

Dragon fruit I thought was more a cactus, but sort of has a vining nature I suppose

TREESNMORE

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Re: Vining fruits-What can you think of?
« Reply #2 on: July 03, 2013, 03:26:34 PM »
Never had any luck with kiwi.Has any one in south fl fruited a good crop.I grew some from tissue culture maybe  300 .Male and female. Never looked good.
Mike

KarenRei

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Re: Vining fruits-What can you think of?
« Reply #3 on: July 03, 2013, 03:34:08 PM »
I really like the look of vines growing up my house and want to try to compile a list of vining fruits to try...so far I have passion fruit and dragon fruit doin a good job...what else can you think of?

Vanilla.  Monstera.  Kiwi.  Other passiflora (Granadilla, Calabash, etc).  Black pepper. 

I'm assuming you want only tropicals.  :)
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nullzero

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Re: Vining fruits-What can you think of?
« Reply #4 on: July 03, 2013, 04:03:45 PM »
Some less mentioned perennial fruiting vine type fruits;

Cucurbita ficifolia
Coccinia grandis
Coccinia sessilifolia
Acanthosicyos naudinianus
Epiphyllum phyllanthus
Rubus Sellowii
Sicana odorifera
Melancium campestre
Melodorum leichhardii
« Last Edit: July 03, 2013, 08:06:47 PM by nullzero »
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CTMIAMI

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Re: Vining fruits-What can you think of?
« Reply #5 on: July 03, 2013, 04:26:36 PM »
Lemons can be trained as vines like they do in Italy.



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cuban007

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Re: Vining fruits-What can you think of?
« Reply #6 on: July 03, 2013, 04:30:34 PM »
CTMiami, at first glance, it looked like Fairchild Botanical Park. Very nice pic. I have seen other citrus trained to vine.

CTMIAMI

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Re: Vining fruits-What can you think of?
« Reply #7 on: July 03, 2013, 04:52:12 PM »
Its Italy
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fruitlovers

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Re: Vining fruits-What can you think of?
« Reply #8 on: July 03, 2013, 05:05:24 PM »
Lemons can be trained as vines like they do in Italy.




Almost any tree can be espaliered, but that is very different from having a vine. Vines have tendrils to grab on, trees don't. To espalier trees is also a lot of work and maintenance.
EDIT: couldn't see the photo of the lemons at first. Having problem with postimg photos not loading. I see now that is not an espalier.
Some other vining plants to consider: all species of passiflora, inca peanut, squashes, gourds, luffa, cassabanana, chayote. You have to be careful with some of these as they can easily take over your whole house and garden left untended.
« Last Edit: July 03, 2013, 05:28:10 PM by fruitlovers »
Oscar

Finca La Isla

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Re: Vining fruits-What can you think of?
« Reply #9 on: July 03, 2013, 05:10:09 PM »
An impressive melon-like member of the cucumber family that we grow sometimes is Sicana Odorifera, called Cahombro here in Costa Rica.

Tropicdude

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Re: Vining fruits-What can you think of?
« Reply #10 on: July 03, 2013, 05:25:31 PM »
Winged bean ( Psophocarpus tetragonolobus ).

I was going to plant cassabanana this year, ordered the seeds, received them , placed the envelope near the PC, next day my 3 yr old. found them then flushed them down the toilet :(
William
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FlyingFoxFruits

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Re: Vining fruits-What can you think of?
« Reply #11 on: July 03, 2013, 08:03:14 PM »
dicella nucifera

RodneyS

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Re: Vining fruits-What can you think of?
« Reply #12 on: July 03, 2013, 08:04:21 PM »
passionfruit
boysenberry
blackberry

mikesid

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Re: Vining fruits-What can you think of?
« Reply #13 on: July 03, 2013, 08:05:39 PM »
A lot of good suggestions...I think the  I may try the casabanana, and the Epiphyllum phyllanthus looks pretty cool...like a flat dragon fruit plant...I've never noticed one before..I've tried growing kiwi in times past with no luck...any passiflora varieties you would avoid?

The cucurbit perennial sounds pretty cool but I always seem to have difficulty with powdery mildew when I've grown anything like squash or cucmber in the garden in times past...I wonder if these are more adapted for our zone...

How fast does the vanilla grow?
« Last Edit: July 03, 2013, 08:07:58 PM by mikesid »

Finca La Isla

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Re: Vining fruits-What can you think of?
« Reply #14 on: July 03, 2013, 09:01:47 PM »
Vanilla is fast growing but takes about 3 years to produce flowers.
Another thing to consider that produces very quickly is plukentia volubilis. 
Peter

nullzero

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Re: Vining fruits-What can you think of?
« Reply #15 on: July 03, 2013, 09:45:30 PM »
A lot of good suggestions...I think the  I may try the casabanana, and the Epiphyllum phyllanthus looks pretty cool...like a flat dragon fruit plant...I've never noticed one before..I've tried growing kiwi in times past with no luck...any passiflora varieties you would avoid?

The cucurbit perennial sounds pretty cool but I always seem to have difficulty with powdery mildew when I've grown anything like squash or cucmber in the garden in times past...I wonder if these are more adapted for our zone...

How fast does the vanilla grow?

Coccinia grandis is native to Thailand, so I think it should adapt well to South FL.
Grow mainly fruits, vegetables, and herbs.

BMc

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Re: Vining fruits-What can you think of?
« Reply #16 on: July 03, 2013, 11:07:59 PM »
Elaeagnus trifoliata
Akebia
Willughbeia

nullzero

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Re: Vining fruits-What can you think of?
« Reply #17 on: July 03, 2013, 11:37:40 PM »
Elaeagnus trifoliata
Akebia
Willughbeia

Elaeagnus trifoliata looks interesting, how is the fruit? Worthy of cultivation or obscure collector plant.
Grow mainly fruits, vegetables, and herbs.

Kay

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Re: Vining fruits-What can you think of?
« Reply #18 on: July 03, 2013, 11:42:10 PM »
Hylocreus is technically a vine cactus.  there are numerous vining cactus.  Some species of Harrisia have interesting fruit (and flowers), but may be better classed as sprawlers/creepers/fallers?

you may also want to look at selenicereus for cactus fruit.  my personal opinion of all Epiphyllum fruits i have tried is not very good.  i like hylocereus and opuntia fruits, but not Epipyhllum, for what its worth :)  they do have impressive flowers though.  people breed out new flower types of "Epis" like they do orchids.  Also a gorgeous purple flowered Hylocereus.  no sure how the fruit is on that one, but it would add some cool new color in bloom.

cucuburt has so many good things.  its a fruit, but treated more veggie like, snake gourd.  man they are fun and really tasty.  Children love to play with them, we use them in our classes on plants sometimes to spark interest.  like a slightly different cucumber taste.

lots of melons out there.

BMc

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Re: Vining fruits-What can you think of?
« Reply #19 on: July 03, 2013, 11:49:38 PM »
Elaeagnus trifoliata
Akebia
Willughbeia

Elaeagnus trifoliata looks interesting, how is the fruit? Worthy of cultivation or obscure collector plant.

Variable. I had some excellent ones last year. As good as anything in the family. I've had some though that were a wierd sweet tomato flavour that I didnt care for. I have to track down the plant with the good fruit to get more seeds as I didnt get a chance to sow them. A friend brought the fruits over from their friends place. A strange thing we noted with the fruit was that after group samplings women seemed to like them more than men - but I thought they were really good  :-\

HIfarm

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Re: Vining fruits-What can you think of?
« Reply #20 on: July 04, 2013, 02:07:12 AM »
Yo, Bruce, you guys have Willugbeia in Aus?  A taxonomist here told me it is the finest fruit in the world.

I was going to suggest that, along with some of the Landolphia / Saba / Clitandra sp.  I think all of those, including Willughbeia, can get to be monsters.  I have heard interesting things about Lardizabala & think that is a more reasonable size.

John

Elaeagnus trifoliata
Akebia
Willughbeia

BMc

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Re: Vining fruits-What can you think of?
« Reply #21 on: July 04, 2013, 02:40:31 AM »
Yo, Bruce, you guys have Willugbeia in Aus?  A taxonomist here told me it is the finest fruit in the world.

I was going to suggest that, along with some of the Landolphia / Saba / Clitandra sp.  I think all of those, including Willughbeia, can get to be monsters.  I have heard interesting things about Lardizabala & think that is a more reasonable size.

John

Elaeagnus trifoliata
Akebia
Willughbeia

I picked up a few seeds from Red Durian. One shot up like a rocket and is still looking happy in the depths of winter here. The other five or so broke in half, but were still green, so we will see if they shoot when the weather picks up... I have a few places where I can put a monster vine, depending on its cold tolerance. If its looking tender I will offer it to folk up north who will be happy to recieve it. I know it had been brought in earlier, as with nearly all good SE Asian fruits,  but I dont know who up north has them growing or fruiting, if anyone. Mike might know something more. If you could tell more about Lardizabala, maybe in another thread, I'd love to know more...

Mike T

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Re: Vining fruits-What can you think of?
« Reply #22 on: July 04, 2013, 04:25:03 AM »
I don't think Willugbias of any species are in Australia. Some of the big Asian tropical NQ collections amassed in the 1970's and 1980's may have some.Unexpected species seem to emerge once in a while from collections and a culture of sharing does not extend to everyone.
BMc the millaa vines can be super productive and seem to vary a lot in fruit quality and the taste always is a little tomatoey. Some however are rather sun dried tomato relish rather than fruity tomato.I think they are better from basalt derived soils. I tried good ones with big fruits at Lake Barrine, on the falls circuit and around Millaa Millaa.   

Doglips

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Re: Vining fruits-What can you think of?
« Reply #23 on: July 04, 2013, 06:55:01 AM »
Not tropical,
I have hops growing on the house, mmmm beer.

HIfarm

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Re: Vining fruits-What can you think of?
« Reply #24 on: July 04, 2013, 12:37:18 PM »



[/quote]

I picked up a few seeds from Red Durian. One shot up like a rocket and is still looking happy in the depths of winter here. The other five or so broke in half, but were still green, so we will see if they shoot when the weather picks up... I have a few places where I can put a monster vine, depending on its cold tolerance. If its looking tender I will offer it to folk up north who will be happy to recieve it. I know it had been brought in earlier, as with nearly all good SE Asian fruits,  but I dont know who up north has them growing or fruiting, if anyone. Mike might know something more. If you could tell more about Lardizabala, maybe in another thread, I'd love to know more...
[/quote]

OK, looks like I screwed up the "quote box" by trying to whittle down my response.  I raised the topic of zabala fruit previously ( http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=5268.msg71549#msg71549 ) but there seemed to be little response.  Things I find out about it are sketchy and sometimes conflicting.  It is from Chile and can occur at some altitude.  Wikipedia (often not reliable) reports it as temperate but other reports suggest probably subtropical.  It sounds like the seeds need a cool damp stratification (maybe even two! - but not freezing) to germinate.  This would be a plus if it grew here as it would not be at all invasive at lower elevations.  Fruit is reportedly highly esteemed locally. 

An interesting aside (at least to me) is people keep getting criticized for raising topics that have been raised before on the forum.  Well, this did not come up in a search; if I hadn't posted about it personally before I would not have known it was in here.  I suspect that there is a wealth of info on the site that is not coming up consistently on searches.

I ordered a bunch of Willughbeia seed from RD as well but none have germinated yet & I am worried that they may not.  I was hoping that you guys down under might have some planted up north -- you do have some amazing stuff down there.

John

 

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