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Author Topic: Receiving and caring for bare rooted plants  (Read 14475 times)

fruitlovers

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Re: Receiving and caring for bare rooted plants
« Reply #25 on: February 10, 2013, 05:06:20 PM »
I've heard that durian scions only last 2-3 days. So unless you are bringing them back in person it's a waste of time and money to mail them internationally. If you know what you're doing you can get close to 100% take on durians with cleft graft. I saw it in Thailand with a master durian grafter. He told me some of his tricks for success: it's best to do the grafting in the evening. He also used a plastic tent over all the grafted plants to increase humidity levels. It's true that many people use approach graft, but i think it's because they haven't perfected their technique. If you look in nurseries in Thailand all the durians are cleft grafted.
Oscar

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Re: Receiving and caring for bare rooted plants
« Reply #26 on: February 10, 2013, 10:18:17 PM »
Thanks a lot. I will not take more than 24 hours. Now I'm pretty confident how I should do it.

fyliu

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Re: Receiving and caring for bare rooted plants
« Reply #27 on: February 10, 2013, 11:27:22 PM »
I think hosing down and soaking in something like superthrive helps a lot. I do the same as you with airlayers.

A problem for me is slugs. They like to feed on tender shoots that come out. They also scrape the skin on older green branches, taking away the bark's protection against moisture loss. Some slug food is a good idea if you're in an area like mine.

msk0072

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Re: Receiving and caring for bare rooted plants
« Reply #28 on: February 13, 2013, 07:54:09 AM »
I've heard that durian scions only last 2-3 days. So unless you are bringing them back in person it's a waste of time and money to mail them internationally. If you know what you're doing you can get close to 100% take on durians with cleft graft. I saw it in Thailand with a master durian grafter. He told me some of his tricks for success: it's best to do the grafting in the evening. He also used a plastic tent over all the grafted plants to increase humidity levels. It's true that many people use approach graft, but i think it's because they haven't perfected their technique. If you look in nurseries in Thailand all the durians are cleft grafted.
Some ideas how to obtain durian scions without to worry about the viability? The source exists.
Mike

fruitlovers

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Re: Receiving and caring for bare rooted plants
« Reply #29 on: February 13, 2013, 04:21:00 PM »
I've heard that durian scions only last 2-3 days. So unless you are bringing them back in person it's a waste of time and money to mail them internationally. If you know what you're doing you can get close to 100% take on durians with cleft graft. I saw it in Thailand with a master durian grafter. He told me some of his tricks for success: it's best to do the grafting in the evening. He also used a plastic tent over all the grafted plants to increase humidity levels. It's true that many people use approach graft, but i think it's because they haven't perfected their technique. If you look in nurseries in Thailand all the durians are cleft grafted.
Some ideas how to obtain durian scions without to worry about the viability? The source exists.
1) Practice grafting before you get the scions. Durians are difficult to graft. Easiest is approach graft, but cleft graft will also work.
2) Keep the transit time as short as possible. Best is if you hand carry the scions back with you.
3) I've heard that scion wood from immature tree works better than full grown tree. I don't know if it's true but suspect it is true as the source as an experienced grafter.
4) Do the grafting in the evening.
5) Keep the grafted plants tented with plastic to increase humidity. Put a few holes in top of plastic for some air ventilation.
Good luck. Let us know how it works out.
Oscar

fyliu

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Re: Receiving and caring for bare rooted plants
« Reply #30 on: February 13, 2013, 05:50:29 PM »
3) I've heard that scion wood from immature tree works better than full grown tree. I don't know if it's true but suspect it is true as the source as an experienced grafter.
Branches closer to the ground/roots tend to be more juvenile and will regenerate tissues faster. Keep this in mind if you are able to cut your own scion wood. Make sure they're not branches of the rootstock though.

msk0072

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Re: Receiving and caring for bare rooted plants
« Reply #31 on: February 14, 2013, 01:52:25 AM »
I've heard that durian scions only last 2-3 days. So unless you are bringing them back in person it's a waste of time and money to mail them internationally. If you know what you're doing you can get close to 100% take on durians with cleft graft. I saw it in Thailand with a master durian grafter. He told me some of his tricks for success: it's best to do the grafting in the evening. He also used a plastic tent over all the grafted plants to increase humidity levels. It's true that many people use approach graft, but i think it's because they haven't perfected their technique. If you look in nurseries in Thailand all the durians are cleft grafted.
Some ideas how to obtain durian scions without to worry about the viability? The source exists.
1) Practice grafting before you get the scions. Durians are difficult to graft. Easiest is approach graft, but cleft graft will also work.
2) Keep the transit time as short as possible. Best is if you hand carry the scions back with you.
3) I've heard that scion wood from immature tree works better than full grown tree. I don't know if it's true but suspect it is true as the source as an experienced grafter.
4) Do the grafting in the evening.
5) Keep the grafted plants tented with plastic to increase humidity. Put a few holes in top of plastic for some air ventilation.
Good luck. Let us know how it works out.
Thanks for the tips.
I am not ready now. Ι need more time so I collect the necessery information fo later. All points are easy except 2. With EMS it takes 5-7 days. Is that to long? Winning in the lottery is an option ;)
Approach graft means you have 2 trees (seedling and mature tree). This is not in my case. Cleft graft is much easy.

Mike

fruitlovers

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Re: Receiving and caring for bare rooted plants
« Reply #32 on: February 14, 2013, 01:56:17 AM »
Like i said before mailing would be waste of money, because even with express service the scion will not be viable. Yes apporach graft you need two plants, usually one a tree and one a potted plant.
Oscar

DurianLover

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Re: Receiving and caring for bare rooted plants
« Reply #33 on: February 14, 2013, 09:12:33 AM »
X
« Last Edit: April 16, 2015, 10:50:55 PM by DurianLover »

Bonakyon

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Re: Receiving and caring for bare rooted plants
« Reply #34 on: January 21, 2014, 03:13:43 PM »
Great info in this thread... Can someone please comment on the viability of bare rooted grafted sapodillas shipped abroad... how long do they remain viable...? I have estimated the timing down to around 4 days that the plant will be "exposed"... I have access a several varieties here but non are as appealing as Hasya, and I must have one... Question for mods... should I have started a new thread with this question...? or how long must a thread remain inactive before one can no longer post in it...?

DurianLover

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Re: Receiving and caring for bare rooted plants
« Reply #35 on: April 16, 2015, 10:53:30 PM »
Does anyone know how sensitive to bare rooting are the following species: Breadfruit, Jackfruit, Sapodilla, Mamey sapote, Black Sapote?
Thank you.

murahilin

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Re: Receiving and caring for bare rooted plants
« Reply #36 on: April 17, 2015, 08:44:37 AM »
Does anyone know how sensitive to bare rooting are the following species: Breadfruit, Jackfruit, Sapodilla, Mamey sapote, Black Sapote?
Thank you.

From that list, jackfruit may be the most sensitive to bare rooting.

Clayton

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Re: Receiving and caring for bare rooted plants
« Reply #37 on: August 05, 2019, 08:39:45 AM »
Hello, I am new to bare root shipped mango trees and I have a question. The alphonso mango tree roots were packed in peat moss, but the peat was dry when I recieved it. The tree looked dried out, so I soaked it in water over night and the next day, I put it in a container with 50/50 small lava rock and top soil from Lowes ( Gardeners: sandy loam, composted manure, recycled forest products). I trust the top soil, because I threw some red onion seeds on it and it grew with out burning. Anyway, three days latter, all the leaves from the alphonso mango tree fell off. Then 2 weeks later, I see buds developing on the tips of the branches.

My question is, should I put it in my green house to receive filtered sun before the buds turn into new leaf growth or should I leave it in the shade?
« Last Edit: August 05, 2019, 02:52:23 PM by Clayton »

 

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