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Author Topic: sapodilla pruning  (Read 443 times)

samuel

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sapodilla pruning
« on: August 23, 2013, 12:33:15 AM »
Hi everyone,

i am wondering how to go for pruning my sapodilla trees. How to start with getting them in their pruning program... I don't have much experience in pruning trees even though i have been documented myself on the subject for a while now but very little practice. And because each specie or genus  are a different story...

i am growing either grafted sapodillas or marcotted ones. I would generally space them about 15 to 20 feet apart. Some trees are about man size now (see the attached picture)

so i am referring on to you long time sapodilla growers to give me advice on how to train sapodilla and possibly others sapotaceae ie canister, mamey that seem to be having the same kind of growth habit.

Is the mango tipping method described by Richard Campbell well adapted to sapotaceae?

Thanks ,

Samuel
Reunion island


Samuel
Reunion Island

SWRancher

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Re: sapodilla pruning
« Reply #1 on: August 23, 2013, 09:27:16 AM »
I have been tip pruning my Sapodilla trees on a yearly basis in order to make them branch better and be more managable. Good thing about Sapodilla is they are a very tough tree so its real hard to hurt them by pruning too hard. 

Finca La Isla

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Re: sapodilla pruning
« Reply #2 on: August 23, 2013, 12:01:32 PM »
I like to prune sapodilla by breaking the tip off.  However, in a case like the one in the photo I would consider cutting the tallest stem back 30-40cm as it has gotten ahead of the rest of the foliage and could end up leaving a gap in the branch structure of the eventual mature tree.
Peter

samuel

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Re: sapodilla pruning
« Reply #3 on: August 23, 2013, 12:26:52 PM »
Thanks for your views guys!

Peter, by pruning back the main stem as you said do you think its new buds will develop from this same point or will it "only" increase growth of the already existent lower branches? Then how frequently would you tip prune the branches? and from what stage of developpement? should i already get started on the lateral growth showing on the picture?

Is the conventional pruning method that consists in selecting  about 4 main branches that will give the tree its backbone a good option with sapodilla and others sapotaceae?
Samuel
Reunion Island

Felipe

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Re: sapodilla pruning
« Reply #4 on: August 23, 2013, 01:50:37 PM »
I agree with Tony and Finca. I have been doing the same to my sapodilla.

Concerning other sapotacea, it depends on the species. Pouterias have a different growth habbit then Manilkara or Chrysophyllum. I suggest tipping pouterias (mamey, abiu, canistel, green zapote...) like you would do it on a mango.

Finca La Isla

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Re: sapodilla pruning
« Reply #5 on: August 23, 2013, 02:45:03 PM »
Hi Samuel
I expect the central branch to bud out again from the point that you cut it to.  I would wait a while on pruning the existing lateral branches as they are fairly tightly bunched.  Pruning the top might get them to spread out more and then they can be tipped.
All trees are different and it's interesting how they can be helped to form.  I like to try and get a tree of this type to respond to tip pruning by putting out three branches that then grow another 40cm or so and snip the tips on those to get more groups coming, filling space.
In your photo it looks as though some very small branches could be cut off so that more light and air can reach everywhere on the plant.
Suerte,
Peter

 

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