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Author Topic: Propagating Seedless Papaya  (Read 1223 times)

LEOOEL

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Propagating Seedless Papaya
« on: September 15, 2013, 02:07:08 PM »
Is it possible? Does anyone know of a way to propagate seedless papaya?

I have/had a tree in my yard that produces seedless fruit. I have no idea if it can be propagated, help!
'Virtue', learn/teach/propagate it, you'll save others and yourself.

plantlover13

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Re: Propagating Seedless Papaya
« Reply #1 on: September 15, 2013, 03:19:39 PM »
Cuttings, maybe, like babaco?
Clarke's first law: When a distinguished but elderly scientist states that something is possible, he is almost certainly right. When he states that something is impossible, he is very probably wrong.

LEOOEL

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Re: Propagating Seedless Papaya
« Reply #2 on: September 15, 2013, 03:39:41 PM »
Definitely worth a try, thanks.
'Virtue', learn/teach/propagate it, you'll save others and yourself.

Mike T

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Re: Propagating Seedless Papaya
« Reply #3 on: September 15, 2013, 05:07:57 PM »
They can be cutting grown from the small side shoots.Seedlessness in papaya has more to do with poor pollination than anything else.

Steve in Los Osos

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Re: Propagating Seedless Papaya
« Reply #4 on: September 15, 2013, 05:22:23 PM »
You can graft the papaya you want onto another young papaya used as a rootstock. Here's a link to a description of the process although Googling might get you something with pictures or video:

http://homeguides.sfgate.com/graft-papaya-22977.html

jcaldeira

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Re: Propagating Seedless Papaya
« Reply #5 on: September 15, 2013, 11:12:46 PM »
Is it possible? Does anyone know of a way to propagate seedless papaya?....

Is the fruit completely seedless?  Many "seedless" fruit varieties (watermelon, citrus, banana) have a small number of seeds, at least in some fruit.  I'd try those first if they are available.

Papaya can be propagated from side branch cuttings taken off a mature tree, but it's more difficult than foolproof seeds.  Side shoots for planting can created by lopping off the top of a mature tree.  I've only done a few so can't advise much except that best success was when I included the collar at the base of the branch in the planting material and removed all leaves except the growing tip.  I did not wrap it, but had it in shade.

John

fruitlovers

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Re: Propagating Seedless Papaya
« Reply #6 on: September 16, 2013, 06:35:29 AM »
Any lone female papaya fruit is going to be "seedless". Just introduce some male or hemaphrodite pollen and you will have seeds. You can also just try growing another papaya tree next to it and you will have plenty of seeds.
Oscar

Mike T

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Re: Propagating Seedless Papaya
« Reply #7 on: September 16, 2013, 06:37:25 AM »
It would be easier just to plant the seeds of a seedless papaya.

fruitlovers

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Re: Propagating Seedless Papaya
« Reply #8 on: September 16, 2013, 06:42:43 AM »
It would be easier just to plant the seeds of a seedless papaya.

Yes, just plant invisible seeds, or use the invisibility cloak to make regular seeds disappear.
Seriously, i think he wants to reproduce this plant thinking it's something special because it's seedless? But there is nothing special if that is its only quality.
Oscar

LEOOEL

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Re: Propagating Seedless Papaya
« Reply #9 on: September 20, 2013, 02:17:31 AM »
Is it possible? Does anyone know of a way to propagate seedless papaya?....

Is the fruit completely seedless?  Many "seedless" fruit varieties (watermelon, citrus, banana) have a small number of seeds, at least in some fruit.  I'd try those first if they are available.

Papaya can be propagated from side branch cuttings taken off a mature tree, but it's more difficult than foolproof seeds.  Side shoots for planting can created by lopping off the top of a mature tree.  I've only done a few so can't advise much except that best success was when I included the collar at the base of the branch in the planting material and removed all leaves except the growing tip.  I did not wrap it, but had it in shade.

John
I will try this method.


It would be easier just to plant the seeds of a seedless papaya.

It would be easier just to plant the seeds of a seedless papaya.

Yes, just plant invisible seeds, or use the invisibility cloak to make regular seeds disappear.

Papayas are good for digestion. Can they thus also be good for your hemorrhoids? Could hemorrhoids be described as an inverted prickly pear? Don't sit on it?
That's not a light at the end of the tunnel, you just have your...
...Coffee enema?...
The fiber from the seedless papaya seeds can be used to make you an invisibility straightjacket.
Wait, those were not seedless papaya seeds that you were eating, those were wild mushrooms.
'Virtue', learn/teach/propagate it, you'll save others and yourself.

fruitlovers

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Re: Propagating Seedless Papaya
« Reply #10 on: September 20, 2013, 02:21:29 AM »
Papayas are good for hemorrhoids, but won't help you much with your asteroids. Especially if they have the earth's name on them.
Oscar

luc

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Re: Propagating Seedless Papaya
« Reply #11 on: September 20, 2013, 08:28:48 PM »
Is it just me or do others also agree that in general fruits with seeds taste better than seedless ?
Luc Vleeracker
Puerto Vallarta
Mexico , Pacific coast.
20 degrees north

LEOOEL

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Re: Propagating Seedless Papaya
« Reply #12 on: September 20, 2013, 11:58:29 PM »
Papayas are good for hemorrhoids, but won't help you much with your asteroids. Especially if they have the earth's name on them.
;D

Is it just me or do others also agree that in general fruits with seeds taste better than seedless ?
I agree, but only if we were to exclude seedless grapes and seedless watermelon. I can enjoy the taste of exquisite grapes and watermelons, without the interruption of spitting out the pits.

For example, the seedless 'sugarapple' tree that I have is a real dissappointment. It only produces about 2 or 3 outstanding fruits per year, the rest are of low quality. If it weren't because the 'sugar-apple' tree has some sentimental value (I bought it from a famous local radio friend who was a Plant Doctor - Jesus Ramos - and has since passed away), I probably would have given it the axe a long time ago.
'Virtue', learn/teach/propagate it, you'll save others and yourself.

fruitlovers

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Re: Propagating Seedless Papaya
« Reply #13 on: September 21, 2013, 04:10:40 AM »
Seedless grapes and seedless watermelon in the USA are terrible in my opinion. I think anyone who likes them has never tasted really good grapes or really good watermelons. I think that is true of most Americans. The old fashioned types of grapes and watermelons are rapidly disappearing. Even small seeded watermelons are not as good tasting as watermelons with large seeds.
Oscar

jcaldeira

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Re: Propagating Seedless Papaya
« Reply #14 on: September 21, 2013, 04:19:34 AM »
Seedless grapes and seedless watermelon in the USA are terrible in my opinion. I think anyone who likes them has never tasted really good grapes or really good watermelons. I think that is true of most Americans. The old fashioned types of grapes and watermelons are rapidly disappearing. Even small seeded watermelons are not as good tasting as watermelons with large seeds.

The poorer quality of seedless fruits probably results from the generations of selecting for seedlessness instead of taste.  While selecting for seedlessness over several generations, there may be some regression in taste back towards the wild type.  Something similar happens in animal breeding when one selection criteria overrules the others.

plantlover13

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Re: Propagating Seedless Papaya
« Reply #15 on: September 21, 2013, 10:08:18 AM »
Seedless grapes and seedless watermelon in the USA are terrible in my opinion. I think anyone who likes them has never tasted really good grapes or really good watermelons. I think that is true of most Americans. The old fashioned types of grapes and watermelons are rapidly disappearing. Even small seeded watermelons are not as good tasting as watermelons with large seeds.

About grapes. Last week, I was walking home from school through a different exit, and i found a wild grape vine, loaded with fruit. I tried one of the grapes. It was seeded, of course, and very sour, but in a good way. I actually couldn't stop eating them. I collected a bunch of seeds, i plan on starting some sort of selection for nice, sour tasting grapes. But now thinking about commercial grapes, it just seems strange, they are all the same. If they are sour, it's not really a pleasant sort of sour. We lost all this unique, readily available (remember, this was growing wild right next to my school!!!!!!) diversity, just to mass produce a product.

I recently read "lost crops of the incas," fascinating book, amazing resource, and again, it highlights the diversity we miss out on because we desire a seedless fruit or two.
Clarke's first law: When a distinguished but elderly scientist states that something is possible, he is almost certainly right. When he states that something is impossible, he is very probably wrong.

fruitlovers

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Re: Propagating Seedless Papaya
« Reply #16 on: September 22, 2013, 01:13:41 AM »
Plants that have been cultivated for many millenia are often seedless, and of very good quality. Two good examples are bananas and breadfruit.
Oscar

LEOOEL

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Re: Propagating Seedless Papaya
« Reply #17 on: September 23, 2013, 10:51:52 PM »
Plants that have been cultivated for many millenia are often seedless, and of very good quality. Two good examples are bananas and breadfruit.

This seems to indicate that with the passage of time, the quality of grapes, watermellon ... and papaya, will most likely keep getting better and better.
'Virtue', learn/teach/propagate it, you'll save others and yourself.

fruitlovers

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Re: Propagating Seedless Papaya
« Reply #18 on: September 24, 2013, 12:28:24 AM »
Plants that have been cultivated for many millenia are often seedless, and of very good quality. Two good examples are bananas and breadfruit.

This seems to indicate that with the passage of time, the quality of grapes, watermellon ... and papaya, will most likely keep getting better and better.

Yes with time most crops get better, but there can be lots of ups and downs along the way, it's not always a constant climb up.
Oscar

greenman62

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Re: Propagating Seedless Papaya
« Reply #19 on: September 24, 2013, 03:12:53 PM »
I have several papaya - 8 mature trees...
every year the first 2-3 fruits are seedless
i have seen them with 2-3 seeds, but most , like this have NONE.

i am guessing its a female/Herm that hasnt pollinated yet.
all of my trees are self pollinating, the fruit are the same (oblong)
so i beleive they are HERMS.
sometimes the tree changes sex from F to H

if the tree goes through any kind of stress, it can change
some say to drive a nail into the trunk
one of mine changed when hurricane Isaac came through.
another changed when i cut the top off.

what variety is it ?
I might like to trade seeds
i am trying to grow as many types i can

Brad



LEOOEL

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Re: Propagating Seedless Papaya
« Reply #20 on: September 24, 2013, 11:42:37 PM »
My papaya is oblong too. Papaya is just a beautiful, tasty, amazing fruit tree.

If an extra-thick flesh, seedless, papaya variety can be efficiently propagated, it could be 'da bomb' when it comes to making money on the open market. Think about it, you'd have a legal monopoly on the sale of that variety.

This could be a possible opportunity for someone to grow a huge seedless papaya enterprise. I wonder if it's been tried before.
« Last Edit: September 24, 2013, 11:45:09 PM by LEOOEL »
'Virtue', learn/teach/propagate it, you'll save others and yourself.

fruitlovers

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Re: Propagating Seedless Papaya
« Reply #21 on: September 25, 2013, 12:06:23 AM »
Don't see any advantage to seedless papayas because the seeds are in the center, not part of what is consumed, and are very easily scooped out.
FYI papaya seeds can also be eaten. They taste similar to black pepper corns or pungent radish. Here they are widely used as ingredient in salad dressing. Also papaya seeds have many medicinal benefits. Especially good for getting rid of intestitinal worms. Great when you're traveling as a preventative.
« Last Edit: September 25, 2013, 12:09:59 AM by fruitlovers »
Oscar

 

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