Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers



Author Topic: Kwai Muk  (Read 12269 times)

luc

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2434
    • Mexico , Puerto Vallarta , Jalisco . 20 degr. North
    • View Profile
Kwai Muk
« on: September 22, 2013, 01:05:01 PM »
Finally holding it's fruit , not a lot but I will be able to have a few people taste them and give their opinion ...

Luc Vleeracker
Puerto Vallarta
Mexico , Pacific coast.
20 degrees north

Ethan

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1639
    • Central California Z9/9
    • View Profile
Re: Kwai Muk
« Reply #1 on: September 22, 2013, 01:24:07 PM »
Awesome Luc, how big/old is your tree?

luc

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2434
    • Mexico , Puerto Vallarta , Jalisco . 20 degr. North
    • View Profile
Re: Kwai Muk
« Reply #2 on: September 22, 2013, 02:09:47 PM »
Awesome Luc, how big/old is your tree?

About 5 meters Ethan , has been flowering and aborting for a few years . If I remember correctly was planted from seed 7 - 8 years ago .
Luc Vleeracker
Puerto Vallarta
Mexico , Pacific coast.
20 degrees north

Ethan

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1639
    • Central California Z9/9
    • View Profile
Re: Kwai Muk
« Reply #3 on: September 22, 2013, 03:55:00 PM »
Thank you Luc, IMHO the ones I've had were really nice tasting fruits, I could eat them by the bucket load.

Good luck!

Mike T

  • Zone 12a
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7326
  • Cairns,Nth Qld, Australia
    • Zone 12a
    • View Profile
Re: Kwai Muk
« Reply #4 on: September 22, 2013, 06:32:55 PM »
They can fruit way younger and smaller than that and it may have something to do with variety.The ones that look like big figs with bright red inside are very good. That fruit looks very large and it is common for masses of golf ball sized fruit.

luc

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2434
    • Mexico , Puerto Vallarta , Jalisco . 20 degr. North
    • View Profile
Re: Kwai Muk
« Reply #5 on: September 22, 2013, 06:50:25 PM »
They can fruit way younger and smaller than that and it may have something to do with variety.The ones that look like big figs with bright red inside are very good. That fruit looks very large and it is common for masses of golf ball sized fruit.

That's the size they are Mike . Golfball , maybe a little bigger..
Luc Vleeracker
Puerto Vallarta
Mexico , Pacific coast.
20 degrees north

fruitlovers

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 15099
  • www.fruitlovers.com
    • USA, Big Island, East Hawaii, Zone 13a
    • View Profile
    • Fruit Lover's Nursery
Re: Kwai Muk
« Reply #6 on: September 23, 2013, 06:47:50 AM »
Awesome Luc, how big/old is your tree?


About 5 meters Ethan , has been flowering and aborting for a few years . If I remember correctly was planted from seed 7 - 8 years ago .

Luc, you planted those Kwai muk seeds almost exactly 9 years ago on Septermber 25, 2004. See here: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/rarefruit/message/13289
I think it's good to give them light fertilizing when they start flowering and fruiting and heavy fertilizing when they are done fruiting.
Oscar

luc

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2434
    • Mexico , Puerto Vallarta , Jalisco . 20 degr. North
    • View Profile
Re: Kwai Muk
« Reply #7 on: October 04, 2013, 02:36:15 PM »
Had my first ripe fruits yesterday and I must say I was so impressed that I didn't share any , just one to my son because he has to know the taste.
I remember that the seeds took a long time to germinate so I opened one , they are in a hard husk , I wonder if this way they will sprout faster ??
Luc Vleeracker
Puerto Vallarta
Mexico , Pacific coast.
20 degrees north

HIfarm

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1016
    • Paukaa, HI, USA zone 12b
    • View Profile
Re: Kwai Muk
« Reply #8 on: October 04, 2013, 02:49:24 PM »
Thanks for posting, Luc.  I assume that this species must vary considerably in quality because I have had people tell me it is not worth growing and others say it is very good.  I tried it for the first time about a week ago and it was very tasty.  Anyone know if this can be grafted onto other Artocarpus roostock? (since I don't have any Kwai Muk rootstock)  I guess that might also speed up the growth rate a little as well...

John

FlyingFoxFruits

  • Prince of Plinia
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12186
  • www.FlyingFoxFruits.com
    • USA, FEMA Region IV, FL Zone 9a
    • View Profile
    • Flying Fox Fruits
Re: Kwai Muk
« Reply #9 on: October 04, 2013, 03:34:07 PM »
I have about 4 trees, from 3 separate sources. One tree has decided to flower finally, about 5ft tall n a 7gal pot.

I'm excited to see if it holds fruits.
www.FlyingFoxFruits.com

www.PLINIAS.com

www.youtube.com/FlyingFoxFruits

I disabled the forum's personal messaging system, please send an email to contact me, FlyingFoxFruits@gmail.com

EvilFruit

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1190
    • Dubai, UAE
    • View Profile
Re: Kwai Muk
« Reply #10 on: October 04, 2013, 04:40:06 PM »
Luc

How do you describe it taste ?
Moh'd

BMc

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1740
  • Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
    • View Profile
Re: Kwai Muk
« Reply #11 on: October 04, 2013, 05:16:44 PM »
Can also be grown from cuttings if you find a good one.

HMHausman

  • Mod Emeritus
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3367
    • USA, Fort Lauderdale, Broward County, Florida, Zone 10B
    • View Profile
    • Pines Ticket Defense, LLC
Re: Kwai Muk
« Reply #12 on: October 04, 2013, 05:26:42 PM »
How do you describe it taste ?

I like to call these fruits jakfruit figs.  They look like mini jakfruit on the inside but are the size of figs.  However, they really taste line neither.  The flesh most closely resembles jakfruit flesh but there is no juicy fruit flavor.  The flavor of the better ones that I have had are sweet with some sub acidity. I can't really give you much more in the way of flavor description. Frankly, they taste just like Kwai Muk. If I had to say that the flavor is reminiscent of some other fruit, I might say, with considerable reservation...strawberry. There is not a huge amount of flesh and the seeds are fairly large in proportion to the size of the fruit, but I think these are pretty good and worth the effort of growing them.  For me, they are much better in taste and smell than marang any day. However, they are not as good as the best jakfruit, in my opinion.
Harry
Fort Lauderdale, FL 
USA

HIfarm

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1016
    • Paukaa, HI, USA zone 12b
    • View Profile
Re: Kwai Muk
« Reply #13 on: October 04, 2013, 05:35:28 PM »
Any special procedure, Mike, or just some rooting hormone and stick it in some media?  I assume hardwood cutting?

John

Can also be grown from cuttings if you find a good one.

edself65

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 929
  • Judge a tree by its fruit, not by its leaves
    • Round Rock, Texas
    • View Profile
    • Texas Rare Fruit Growers
Re: Kwai Muk
« Reply #14 on: October 04, 2013, 05:51:10 PM »
The Kwai Muk that I have tried here in Texas has a nice apricot flavor with citrus overtones. Really worth growing in my opinion.

Thanks,

Ed

fruitlovers

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 15099
  • www.fruitlovers.com
    • USA, Big Island, East Hawaii, Zone 13a
    • View Profile
    • Fruit Lover's Nursery
Re: Kwai Muk
« Reply #15 on: October 04, 2013, 06:15:10 PM »
Thanks for posting, Luc.  I assume that this species must vary considerably in quality because I have had people tell me it is not worth growing and others say it is very good.  I tried it for the first time about a week ago and it was very tasty.  Anyone know if this can be grafted onto other Artocarpus roostock? (since I don't have any Kwai Muk rootstock)  I guess that might also speed up the growth rate a little as well...

John

Where did you eat the kwai muk? Some people confuse lakoocha with kwai muk, so it's possible you actually tried lakoocha, which in my opinion lakoocha is not as good eating quality. I think i'm the first to introduce kwai muk to Hawaii. BTW i have a bunch of one gallon kwai muk plants available for sale.
Oscar

HIfarm

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1016
    • Paukaa, HI, USA zone 12b
    • View Profile
Re: Kwai Muk
« Reply #16 on: October 04, 2013, 06:53:42 PM »

Where did you eat the kwai muk? Some people confuse lakoocha with kwai muk, so it's possible you actually tried lakoocha, which in my opinion lakoocha is not as good eating quality. I think i'm the first to introduce kwai muk to Hawaii. BTW i have a bunch of one gallon kwai muk plants available for sale.

Hi Oscar,

It was a grower over in Hakalau.  Not sure where he got the tree, I believe it was seed grown from what he said.  The fruit was small, size of a golf ball or perhaps a little bigger.

I need to make a visit down to your place some time -- I know you have a number of things I am interested in.

John

luc

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2434
    • Mexico , Puerto Vallarta , Jalisco . 20 degr. North
    • View Profile
Re: Kwai Muk
« Reply #17 on: October 04, 2013, 07:30:46 PM »
Thanks for posting, Luc.  I assume that this species must vary considerably in quality because I have had people tell me it is not worth growing and others say it is very good.  I tried it for the first time about a week ago and it was very tasty.  Anyone know if this can be grafted onto other Artocarpus roostock? (since I don't have any Kwai Muk rootstock)  I guess that might also speed up the growth rate a little as well...

John

Where did you eat the kwai muk? Some people confuse lakoocha with kwai muk, so it's possible you actually tried lakoocha, which in my opinion lakoocha is not as good eating quality. I think i'm the first to introduce kwai muk to Hawaii. BTW i have a bunch of one gallon kwai muk plants available for sale.

Aaah , this damn Lakoocha , still missing in my orchard , have not been able to germinate a single plant and tried several times....
Luc Vleeracker
Puerto Vallarta
Mexico , Pacific coast.
20 degrees north

GwenninPR

  • Zone 13 , Puerto Rico
  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 319
    • Rio Grande, Puerto Rico zone 13a
    • View Profile
    • Puerto Rico Day Trips
Re: Kwai Muk
« Reply #18 on: October 05, 2013, 06:53:07 AM »
The Kwai Muk that I have tried here in Texas has a nice apricot flavor with citrus overtones. Really worth growing in my opinion.

Thanks,Ed

That is what I recall them tasting like- apricot-ish.  The texture was a bit stringy, but  I liked them very much.

Mike T

  • Zone 12a
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7326
  • Cairns,Nth Qld, Australia
    • Zone 12a
    • View Profile
Re: Kwai Muk
« Reply #19 on: October 05, 2013, 07:07:11 AM »
I have tried lakoochas from a variety of trees from different sources and they are pretty good but varied a bit in quality and character.They are not really stringy, maybe gooey to rubbery and the taste of good ones resembles dry apricots.

EvilFruit

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1190
    • Dubai, UAE
    • View Profile
Re: Kwai Muk
« Reply #20 on: October 05, 2013, 07:34:23 AM »
How do you describe it taste ?


I like to call these fruits jakfruit figs.  They look like mini jakfruit on the inside but are the size of figs.  However, they really taste line neither.  The flesh most closely resembles jakfruit flesh but there is no juicy fruit flavor.  The flavor of the better ones that I have had are sweet with some sub acidity. I can't really give you much more in the way of flavor description. Frankly, they taste just like Kwai Muk. If I had to say that the flavor is reminiscent of some other fruit, I might say, with considerable reservation...strawberry. There is not a huge amount of flesh and the seeds are fairly large in proportion to the size of the fruit, but I think these are pretty good and worth the effort of growing them.  For me, they are much better in taste and smell than marang any day. However, they are not as good as the best jakfruit, in my opinion.
 

Thank you HMHausman

Strawberry, is one of my favorite fruit. From what I heard, once you eat a marang, it immediately becomes one of your favorite fruits.I guess For most people Jackfruit  properly  hold the torch for the most delicious fruit from Artocarpus spp.

I guess I need to find a source for Kwai Muk seeds.  ::)

Update:
Saw your garden at (http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/load/tropicalfruits/msg0901484314828.html).... looks Wonderful
« Last Edit: October 05, 2013, 09:15:38 AM by EvilFruit »
Moh'd

Mike T

  • Zone 12a
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7326
  • Cairns,Nth Qld, Australia
    • Zone 12a
    • View Profile
Re: Kwai Muk
« Reply #21 on: October 05, 2013, 07:48:12 AM »
I don't to bring the haus down but I would have to disagree with that quote in that good ones are better than marang. They also have a way higher amount of flesh in fact I struggled to get enough seeds to send to a few chums from the last batch I had. Chempadaks are not all good as they vary so much. Let me dig up a pic.





These 2 are good types but tasted totally different.

mangomike

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 183
    • USA California
    • View Profile
Re: Kwai Muk
« Reply #22 on: October 05, 2013, 01:50:20 PM »
Quote
It was a grower over in Hakalau.  Not sure where he got the tree, I believe it was seed grown from what he said.  The fruit was small, size of a golf ball or perhaps a little bigger.

That may have been me; I had a nursery in Hakalau many years ago, and I did propagate kwai muk. I recall that the fruits were golf ball sized, and quite tasty IMO. All the trees I had were seed grown, from an introduction by Dr Franklin Martin.

HMHausman

  • Mod Emeritus
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3367
    • USA, Fort Lauderdale, Broward County, Florida, Zone 10B
    • View Profile
    • Pines Ticket Defense, LLC
Re: Kwai Muk
« Reply #23 on: October 05, 2013, 03:45:12 PM »
I don't [want] to bring the haus down but I would have to disagree with that quote in that good ones are better than marang. They also have a way higher amount of flesh in fact I struggled to get enough seeds to send to a few chums from the last batch I had.

Not to worry.  After all, I am and remain the world's foremost authority on what I personally prefer or like and what I don't.
Harry
Fort Lauderdale, FL 
USA

fruitlovers

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 15099
  • www.fruitlovers.com
    • USA, Big Island, East Hawaii, Zone 13a
    • View Profile
    • Fruit Lover's Nursery
Re: Kwai Muk
« Reply #24 on: October 05, 2013, 04:54:32 PM »
How do you describe it taste ?


I like to call these fruits jakfruit figs.  They look like mini jakfruit on the inside but are the size of figs.  However, they really taste line neither.  The flesh most closely resembles jakfruit flesh but there is no juicy fruit flavor.  The flavor of the better ones that I have had are sweet with some sub acidity. I can't really give you much more in the way of flavor description. Frankly, they taste just like Kwai Muk. If I had to say that the flavor is reminiscent of some other fruit, I might say, with considerable reservation...strawberry. There is not a huge amount of flesh and the seeds are fairly large in proportion to the size of the fruit, but I think these are pretty good and worth the effort of growing them.  For me, they are much better in taste and smell than marang any day. However, they are not as good as the best jakfruit, in my opinion.
 

Thank you HMHausman

Strawberry, is one of my favorite fruit. From what I heard, once you eat a marang, it immediately becomes one of your favorite fruits.I guess For most people Jackfruit  properly  hold the torch for the most delicious fruit from Artocarpus spp.

I guess I need to find a source for Kwai Muk seeds.  ::)

Update:
Saw your garden at (http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/load/tropicalfruits/msg0901484314828.html).... looks Wonderful


I think for most people this would not be the case. Jackfruit certainly is the most commonly planted of the artocarpus, but very many people don't like it's taste, i think because it has quite a strong taste, maybe too bubble gummy? Personally i like jackfruits quite a lot, but many don't. Yet i've never had a person taste marang that didn't like it. I think it's more universally liked because it's taste is more delicate or refined. Certainly Harry is in the minority on this one.
Oscar

 

Copyright © Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers