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Author Topic: Info on pulasan fruit trees  (Read 695 times)

Doug

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Info on pulasan fruit trees
« on: October 28, 2013, 10:04:13 PM »

From what I gather on the net, pulasan trees need both male and female trees to bear fruit. Reading this site it sounds like some of you have had success with just one tree. Is that true?

fruitlovers

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Re: Info on pulasan fruit trees
« Reply #1 on: October 28, 2013, 10:07:05 PM »

From what I gather on the net, pulasan trees need both male and female trees to bear fruit. Reading this site it sounds like some of you have had success with just one tree. Is that true?

That's because grafted trees are usually hermaphrodite, so self pollinating. (Same is true with rambutans.) There are male, female, and hermies.
Oscar

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Re: Info on pulasan fruit trees
« Reply #2 on: October 28, 2013, 10:09:08 PM »
Depends on how you define success.  In Florida success with Pulasan, one tree or a dozen, is getting them to grow larger than 3 feet tall. So far, none of my three footers have had any notion of fruiting.  ;)
Harry
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Re: Info on pulasan fruit trees
« Reply #3 on: October 28, 2013, 10:15:40 PM »
Depends on how you define success.  In Florida success with Pulasan, one tree or a dozen, is getting them to grow larger than 3 feet tall. So far, none of my three footers have had any notion of fruiting.  ;)

Yeah, fruiting pulasan is probably on the same level of difficulty in Florida as durian.
Oscar

Finca La Isla

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Re: Info on pulasan fruit trees
« Reply #4 on: October 29, 2013, 10:44:19 AM »
With rambutan seedlings there are lots of male, non productive trees.  It is probably 50%.  My experience with pulusan seedlings is that most, though not all, are very productive.  I would guess that only 10% are not producers.  I'm not too sure why that would be. 
Pulusan has just finished flowering on my farm and we expect to harvest around March.  There are two well isolated seedlings that have loaded up with fruit.  Perhaps pulusan naturally has a much higher rate of hermaphodrite trees than rambutan.
Peter

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Re: Info on pulasan fruit trees
« Reply #5 on: October 29, 2013, 12:39:00 PM »
Peter...it's been a while since we've seen any pics from you.  Would love to see some of what is going on with your farm right now.  Thanks

fruitlovers

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Re: Info on pulasan fruit trees
« Reply #6 on: October 29, 2013, 06:17:58 PM »
With rambutan seedlings there are lots of male, non productive trees.  It is probably 50%.  My experience with pulusan seedlings is that most, though not all, are very productive.  I would guess that only 10% are not producers.  I'm not too sure why that would be. 
Pulusan has just finished flowering on my farm and we expect to harvest around March.  There are two well isolated seedlings that have loaded up with fruit.  Perhaps pulusan naturally has a much higher rate of hermaphodrite trees than rambutan.
Peter

Did you obtain your seeds from hermaphrodite pulasan trees? If so then you are going to get a much higher pecentage of hermaphrodite trees than if you take your seeds from female trees. Same is true with rambutan.
Oscar

Finca La Isla

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Re: Info on pulasan fruit trees
« Reply #7 on: October 29, 2013, 09:12:01 PM »
Oscar, that's a good question.  The difference between male and female flowers on rambutan is very plain to me.  However the hermaphrodite flowers I am not too sure about.  Also, can't there be male/female trees that have both kinds of flowers individually?  I've never actually noticed this either.
My comments have to do with my experience of simply running into lots of male rambutans and very few male pulusans.  Maybe that's how it is generally, or perhaps it has to do with the introduction material.  Even though there are a lot of rambutans in CR it could be that the original rambutan seedling material introduced into Golfito by Chiquita has been the source of almost all the seedling material.
More recently a lot of select rambutan material has been propagated and the older, sometimes called 'criollo" stuff is being forced out of the market.
Pulusan is still a minor fruit although rambutan is huge. 
Peter

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Re: Info on pulasan fruit trees
« Reply #8 on: October 29, 2013, 10:32:22 PM »
From personal experience, rambutan trees that i grew from fruits of grafted hermaphrodite trees produced amost all hermaphrodite or female trees, almost zero males. I'm guessing same would be true with pulasan and that's why you got no males. It's similar case as with papayas, hermaphrodites don't produce males, only more hermaphrodites and females.
Oscar

Mike T

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Re: Info on pulasan fruit trees
« Reply #9 on: October 30, 2013, 12:58:22 AM »
It is usual for papaya hermies crossed with other hermies to produce 25% male 25% female and 50% hermies, if memory serves me correctly.Hermie x female produces 50% of each and hermie x male produces 50% male and 50% hermie. It should be the same outcome for other species that have male,female and hermies and a normal sex ratio.

fruitlovers

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Re: Info on pulasan fruit trees
« Reply #10 on: October 30, 2013, 02:37:53 AM »
It is usual for papaya hermies crossed with other hermies to produce 25% male 25% female and 50% hermies, if memory serves me correctly.Hermie x female produces 50% of each and hermie x male produces 50% male and 50% hermie. It should be the same outcome for other species that have male,female and hermies and a normal sex ratio.

I believe you have it backwards, hermie x hermie produces 2/3 hermie, 1/3 females.
 
Oscar

Mike T

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Re: Info on pulasan fruit trees
« Reply #11 on: October 30, 2013, 03:22:56 AM »
Yes Oscar it is all coming back to me now and you are correct as usual.

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Re: Info on pulasan fruit trees
« Reply #12 on: November 12, 2013, 09:26:38 AM »
How tall/wide will grafted pulasan seebabat tree's grow? And are the roots destructive?

I am changing the garden again and this time i want to plan it before i plant any new tree's. All the ornamental tree's will be gone soon and the garden will be jam-packed with fruit-tree's only. :P

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Re: Info on pulasan fruit trees
« Reply #13 on: November 12, 2013, 04:38:04 PM »
How tall/wide will grafted pulasan seebabat tree's grow? And are the roots destructive?

I am changing the garden again and this time i want to plan it before i plant any new tree's. All the ornamental tree's will be gone soon and the garden will be jam-packed with fruit-tree's only. :P

Similar to rambutan tree, just slower growing.
Oscar

 

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