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Author Topic: Mangos: Early, Mid, Late Season  (Read 5809 times)

Mr. Clean

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Mangos: Early, Mid, Late Season
« on: April 01, 2012, 07:51:26 PM »
I have a few mangos and I am trying to figure out whether they are early, mid or late season.

Carrie
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Lemon Zest
Mahachanok
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bsbullie

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Re: Mangos: Early, Mid, Late Season
« Reply #1 on: April 01, 2012, 08:19:08 PM »
I have a few mangos and I am trying to figure out whether they are early, mid or late season.

Carrie
coconut cream
Lemon Zest
mahachanok
NDM
Carrie - early with a possible lighter second wave late in the season.
Coconut Cream & LZ - from what I remember, mid
Mahachanok - they stretch out through multiple seasons...from late early season through mid late season (June thru August)
NDM - mid (there are some people who have gotten it to produce in the off season (November/December)
- Rob

phantomcrab

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Re: Mangos: Early, Mid, Late Season
« Reply #2 on: April 01, 2012, 08:26:36 PM »
It would be helpful if someone that grows many varieties would keep a weekly tally of the mango cultivars that are ripening. That would give an idea of the length of a cultivar's fruiting season and the order of ripening. Alternatively, it could be made a group effort with a calendar and tally system. Just log in and vote.
From what I've read, Maha Chanok seems to have an extended fruiting season. Some varieties can have two fruiting periods in south FL.
Richard

HMHausman

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Re: Mangos: Early, Mid, Late Season
« Reply #3 on: April 01, 2012, 08:45:37 PM »
It would be helpful if someone that grows many varieties would keep a weekly tally of the mango cultivars that are ripening. That would give an idea of the length of a cultivar's fruiting season and the order of ripening. Alternatively, it could be made a group effort with a calendar and tally system. Just log in and vote.
From what I've read, Maha Chanok seems to have an extended fruiting season. Some varieties can have two fruiting periods in south FL.

This would be somewhat impractical for several reasons.  First, there is variability between cultivars of the same type as between different growing areas.  Secondly, from year to year there is variability even in the same growing area. Thirdly, mangoes tend to mature in groups.  That is why they generally are grouped only in three categories....early, mid and late.  That all being said, I usually try to mention what is ripening and when and will endeavor to do it more consistantly.  If time permits.  Mango season gets very, very busy.  Maybe with a lull in the lychee season it will allow more focus on mangoes.

Harry
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Tim

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Re: Mangos: Early, Mid, Late Season
« Reply #4 on: April 02, 2012, 10:21:03 AM »
Pine Island nursery mango variety page has some info on this and it's a good start as for reading material.
Tim

zands

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Re: Mangos: Early, Mid, Late Season
« Reply #5 on: April 02, 2012, 11:57:28 AM »
I have a few mangos and I am trying to figure out whether they are early, mid or late season.

Carrie
coconut cream
Lemon Zest
mahachanok
NDM

It seems to me that 80% of mango varieties are mid-Season meaning getting ripe last week of June for South East Florida meaning Dade, Broward, Palm Beach counties.  So you can have a diverse collection of mango trees but they all come in Mid-Season so you are inundated like everyone else. Southern California is on a different time line maybe 45-60 days later. If you want early or late mangoes then you have to read up on them. Neelam is an uncommon late one that is dwarfish. Keitt and Gold Nugget are called late too meaning eating them in August and if you are lucky late August and September

Glenn is a kind of early mango meaning you might eat some last week of May in SE Florida//// Then Rosigold even earlier and a few others too      Just my 2 worth

bsbullie

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Re: Mangos: Early, Mid, Late Season
« Reply #6 on: April 02, 2012, 12:22:01 PM »
I have a few mangos and I am trying to figure out whether they are early, mid or late season.

Carrie
coconut cream
Lemon Zest
mahachanok
NDM

It seems to me that 80% of mango varieties are mid-Season meaning getting ripe last week of June for South East Florida meaning Dade, Broward, Palm Beach counties.  So you can have a diverse collection of mango trees but they all come in Mid-Season so you are inundated like everyone else. Southern California is on a different time line maybe 45-60 days later. If you want early or late mangoes then you have to read up on them. Neelam is an uncommon late one that is dwarfish. Keitt and Gold Nugget are called late too meaning eating them in August and if you are lucky late August and September

Glenn is a kind of early mango meaning you might eat some last week of May in SE Florida//// Then Rosigold even earlier and a few others too      Just my 2 worth
Florigon is usually pretty early.
- Rob

zands

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Re: Mangos: Early, Mid, Late Season
« Reply #7 on: April 02, 2012, 12:34:40 PM »

Florigon is usually pretty early.

Thanks much for that memo and reminder. I have a Florigon that has "issues" that I will be giving a lot more attention to. My further 2 worth is that early mangoes are fresher and more reliable than late mangoes. Late ones get more squirrel etc attacks and internal rot due to overstaying their welcome...meaning hanging there for months tempting the two legged and four legged raiders and the grim mango reaper of internal breakdown.


bsbullie

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Re: Mangos: Early, Mid, Late Season
« Reply #8 on: April 02, 2012, 01:44:55 PM »

Florigon is usually pretty early.

Thanks much for that memo and reminder. I have a Florigon that has "issues" that I will be giving a lot more attention to. My further 2 worth is that early mangoes are fresher and more reliable than late mangoes. Late ones get more squirrel etc attacks and internal rot due to overstaying their welcome...meaning hanging there for months tempting the two legged and four legged raiders and the grim mango reaper of internal breakdown.
The later varieties also have a greater chance of being affected by rain, wind (afternoon T'storms) and the mighty 'canes.
- Rob

phantomcrab

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Re: Mangos: Early, Mid, Late Season
« Reply #9 on: April 06, 2012, 07:17:14 PM »
Here is a link to the Broward County RFVC mango listing. No recent introductions are listed but most older ones are present.
http://www.rfvcbroward.org/mangos.html
Richard

Mr. Clean

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Re: Mangos: Early, Mid, Late Season
« Reply #10 on: April 09, 2012, 06:01:32 PM »
Thank you for all of the responses.
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natsgarden123

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Re: Mangos: Early, Mid, Late Season
« Reply #11 on: April 09, 2012, 08:32:38 PM »

Florigon is usually pretty early.

Thanks much for that memo and reminder. I have a Florigon that has "issues" that I will be giving a lot more attention to. My further 2 worth is that early mangoes are fresher and more reliable than late mangoes. Late ones get more squirrel etc attacks and internal rot due to overstaying their welcome...meaning hanging there for months tempting the two legged and four legged raiders and the grim mango reaper of internal breakdown.

What issue are you talking about? I always thought Florigon was pretty easy to grow?   :-\



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Re: Mangos: Early, Mid, Late Season
« Reply #12 on: April 10, 2012, 03:37:56 AM »
My own Florigons with some PM issues seem to have fruited fine despite some powdery mildew curling the leaves. I didn't spray them. Looks like Florigon will be one of my best early setters.
Oscar

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Re: Mangos: Early, Mid, Late Season
« Reply #13 on: April 10, 2012, 07:47:46 AM »
In Florida, Florigon is one of the best producing mangoes. It will even produce well during "bad" mango years, like during the woeful 2010 season. Nice having fruit on the tree when most others are bare. Really fungus resistant too.

SWRancher

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Re: Mangos: Early, Mid, Late Season
« Reply #14 on: April 10, 2012, 05:26:03 PM »
I was a little disappointed that my 6-7 foot tall Florigon tree didn't bloom this year. It seems perfectly healthy just kind of asleep. I'm hopeful that it will bear next season.   

HMHausman

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Re: Mangos: Early, Mid, Late Season
« Reply #15 on: April 11, 2012, 08:38:49 AM »
You know, it is a bit strange.  There have been several previously blooming and fruiting mango trees that just have not bloomed this year.  Florigon wasn't one of them at my house but amongst the non-bloomers were Bombay, Kensington Pride and Hatcher.  I have no idea why.  This is a first for Bombay ....which is quite a large tree. It even flowered and fruited immediatley after major limb damagae from Hurricane Wilma.  Hatcher has fruited for the last 3 years, I think.  Kensington pride was a new planting from the Fairchild Festival 2 years ago, but it set abut 5 fruits last year after a good blooming cycle.

Harry
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