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Author Topic: Fruiting pulusan and or Rambutan via marcott in a pot!  (Read 12973 times)

lycheeluva

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Re: Fruiting pulusan and or Rambutan via marcott in a pot!
« Reply #25 on: April 09, 2012, 08:30:00 PM »
Oscar
This past summer I got to try 4 varieties of some of the best PawPaws from the Univ of Kentucky experimental grove. I will contact a grower that I know to see if he is willing to ship to Hawaii. My thoughts on Paw Paws...they are OK but not even close to a good Atemoya or Sugar Apple.
NR

Noel, perhaps while you are at it, you can ask him if he will ship to NY as well. been dying to try pawpaw
« Last Edit: April 11, 2012, 08:42:40 AM by murahilin »

lycheeluva

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Re: Fruiting pulusan and or Rambutan via marcott in a pot!
« Reply #26 on: April 09, 2012, 08:31:11 PM »
Juan named his Pulasan the "Maruca" Pulasan and he plans to eventually produce grafted trees.

Noel, any idea if he will have any grafted Maruca avilable in August
« Last Edit: April 11, 2012, 08:42:58 AM by murahilin »

nullzero

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Re: Fruiting pulusan and or Rambutan via marcott in a pot!
« Reply #27 on: April 09, 2012, 08:39:53 PM »
Here is the post by Axel about the cherimoya like pawpaw; http://www.cloudforest.com/cafe/gardening/cherimoya-like-pawpaws-t1984.html
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FloridaGreenMan

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Re: Fruiting pulusan and or Rambutan via marcott in a pot!
« Reply #28 on: April 09, 2012, 09:01:43 PM »
Noel, any idea if he will have any grafted Maruca avilable in August

Really doubt it. I spoke to him a month ago and he was first going to graft trees for his own orchard and then would have them for the public.  It may be several years before you can buy one from him.

   
« Last Edit: April 11, 2012, 08:43:31 AM by murahilin »
FloridaGreenMan

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Re: Fruiting pulusan and or Rambutan via marcott in a pot!
« Reply #29 on: April 09, 2012, 09:27:57 PM »
In my humble opinion, Pulasan is one of the best fruits in the world....!!! For sure in my top 3.  The ones in the fotos  are from Panoramic Farm in PR. There are incredibly good cultivars and rather bland cultivars much like with all fruits. When I was in Honduras, I got to try some fantastic ones that were grafted trees brought in from SE Asia. They do best in acid soils and prefer high humidity year round and no real dry season.  I wish the best to anyone that tries to grow them outside of the true tropics but we always up to the challenge and hey, you never know!   





FloridaGreenMan

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Re: Fruiting pulusan and or Rambutan via marcott in a pot!
« Reply #30 on: April 09, 2012, 10:06:58 PM »
I think PR maybe no radiation...I'd buy pulusan from there...maybe we can get a group to split an order here in central FL...I know I'm getting pawpaw for sure!  I'm not missing the bus for the 31st time in my life!!!  I'm sick of it!  NEED PAWPAW NOW! :o sorry I lost it there for a sec. My B.A.L. is low...Blood Annonaceae Level.


Where do you buy pawpaw? I'd love to get some also. Anyone shipping the fruits?


Oscar
This past summer I got to try 4 varieties of some of the best PawPaws from the Univ of Kentucky experimental grove. I will contact a grower that I know to see if he is willing to ship to Hawaii. My thoughts on Paw Paws...they are OK but not even close to a good Atemoya or Sugar Apple.
NR




Somebody sent me one of the improved  paw paw varieties a few years back from the Paw paw festival and i thought it was excellent, not only in taste but also great fregrance and coloration in the fruit. Unfortunately i didn't get the name of the variety.
Oscar

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Re: Fruiting pulusan and or Rambutan via marcott in a pot!
« Reply #31 on: April 09, 2012, 10:15:00 PM »
I had the same fruits that LL had and while the Pulasan we had at Juan's was my favorite fruit of the trip, I very much enjoyed fruits we had elsewhere.  I think he's being a bit dramatic to assess the difference at 100x. But that's LL  I enjoy the taste and especially the look of both rambutan and pulasan.  The trees that I saw are not very dramatic in and of themselves.  I did not see the stately trees that one might describe when looking at a big lychee or even a mangosteen.  However, the bizarre/strange/alien look to the fruit hanging on the tree makes seeing them quite an experience.  Rambutan fruit is sweet and delicious, but for me lacks the complexity that I enjoy in fruit.  Then there is the issue of the clinging seed coat that is fairly annoying.  I understand that there are some freestone or freer stone varieities, but I did not expereince this.  The ones I had were clingy and clingier...if that's a word.  Now on to the growing of these in Florida.  I came away from Puerto Rico with the thought that it would be possible and I planted seed out of rambutan and pulasan.  Before I invested in grafed/air layered trees I wanted to see just how cold sensitive they were.  I can report to you that rambutan is less cold sensitive that Pulasan.  However, both are very, very cold sensitive.....to the point that I have no seedling pulasans alive after two years of seed planting.  I still have some rambutans that are alive and kicking. I think pulasan is even more cold sensitive than durian....at least the seedlings that I have planted out seem to demonstrate that  I would think that to have any chance of getting pulasan to any size....you need to not allow ambient temps to go below 60. Constant 70's or higher would be much better, but 55 pretty much did my plants in.  That reality jolted me into the realiztion that unless I build a greenhouse, I will never be able accomplish this dream.  The fact that the pulasan trees were not huge and were still fruiting gave me hope that this could be done in a reasonable amount of time.  The temperature is the only hindrance.  Anyway, if you can control the temp...give it a go.....it is a challenge, but if you are succesful, you will be rewarded with an excellent fruit if you get a good culitvar.

Harry


Seebabat is cling free. Problem with seedlings is usually they cling tenaciously to the seeds and quite inferior for that reason. It's kind of like tasting one or two turpentine seedling mangos and then concluding you don't like mangos. BTW pulasan trees do get large and are very handsome trees I'll try to post a photo later. I'll mak e a convery of you yet, for now you'll just have to take my word for it, a good pulasan is almost as good as a lychee.
Oscar

Jackfruitwhisperer69

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Re: Fruiting pulusan and or Rambutan via marcott in a pot!
« Reply #32 on: April 10, 2012, 04:25:57 PM »
I have successfully germinated seeds from a supermarket bought Rambutans! They were delicious and very sweet! I can't remeber the country of origin...maybe Thailand or Malaysia!
I wanted to see if they will adapt to a sub-tropical climate...and they didn't!!! :( :( :(

@Adam- Good luck with the Nepheliums!!! :) And as always...KEEP US POSTED!!! I would really like to see them produce in a pot!!!!

Irradiation requirement for rambutan may just be for USA. Don't know if Europe requires it? They may not be as worried as USA about fruitfly infestation in their colder climates.

Hi Oscar,
No risk there, The winter frost will deal with them!!! 8)


BTW-the photo you uploaded of the rambutan looks fantastic...I mean Yummy ;D ;D ;D
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Re: Fruiting pulusan and or Rambutan via marcott in a pot!
« Reply #33 on: April 11, 2012, 08:29:08 AM »
I had the same fruits that LL had and while the Pulasan we had at Juan's was my favorite fruit of the trip, I very much enjoyed fruits we had elsewhere.  I think he's being a bit dramatic to assess the difference at 100x. But that's LL  I enjoy the taste and especially the look of both rambutan and pulasan.  The trees that I saw are not very dramatic in and of themselves.  I did not see the stately trees that one might describe when looking at a big lychee or even a mangosteen.  However, the bizarre/strange/alien look to the fruit hanging on the tree makes seeing them quite an experience.  Rambutan fruit is sweet and delicious, but for me lacks the complexity that I enjoy in fruit.  Then there is the issue of the clinging seed coat that is fairly annoying.  I understand that there are some freestone or freer stone varieities, but I did not expereince this.  The ones I had were clingy and clingier...if that's a word.  Now on to the growing of these in Florida.  I came away from Puerto Rico with the thought that it would be possible and I planted seed out of rambutan and pulasan.  Before I invested in grafed/air layered trees I wanted to see just how cold sensitive they were.  I can report to you that rambutan is less cold sensitive that Pulasan.  However, both are very, very cold sensitive.....to the point that I have no seedling pulasans alive after two years of seed planting.  I still have some rambutans that are alive and kicking. I think pulasan is even more cold sensitive than durian....at least the seedlings that I have planted out seem to demonstrate that  I would think that to have any chance of getting pulasan to any size....you need to not allow ambient temps to go below 60. Constant 70's or higher would be much better, but 55 pretty much did my plants in.  That reality jolted me into the realiztion that unless I build a greenhouse, I will never be able accomplish this dream.  The fact that the pulasan trees were not huge and were still fruiting gave me hope that this could be done in a reasonable amount of time.  The temperature is the only hindrance.  Anyway, if you can control the temp...give it a go.....it is a challenge, but if you are succesful, you will be rewarded with an excellent fruit if you get a good culitvar.

Harry


Seebabat is cling free. Problem with seedlings is usually they cling tenaciously to the seeds and quite inferior for that reason. It's kind of like tasting one or two turpentine seedling mangos and then concluding you don't like mangos. BTW pulasan trees do get large and are very handsome trees I'll try to post a photo later. I'll mak e a convery of you yet, for now you'll just have to take my word for it, a good pulasan is almost as good as a lychee.

Oscar, I thought you hadn't read my post correctly...but in reviewing my post, I did not convey my sentiments that I was trying to get across regarding the Pulasan.  I am 1000% with you on the Pulasan.  I must have written this in other posts...perhaps even back on Garden Web after the Puerto Rico trip.  All of the Pulasan's that we had in Puerto Rico were good.  There were some that were better than others....but I did not have any that were no good (save for a perhaps occasional over ripe fruit). I planted seeds and entertained trying to fruit the darned thing, despite the ulta-tropicalness of it.....something that actually says volumes about what I thought of the fruit. In my present hobby mode, I gave up on this crazy pipe dream stuff in favor of the more practical and saleable.  The pulasans that I enjoyed in Puerto Rico were so much to my likeing that it rekindled the crazy desire to try to do the unheard of......fruit them out of their ultra tropical range.  I very much agree that the best pulasan is as good as any fruit i have ever had.

Harry
« Last Edit: April 11, 2012, 09:41:11 AM by HMHausman »
Harry
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murahilin

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Re: Fruiting pulusan and or Rambutan via marcott in a pot!
« Reply #34 on: April 11, 2012, 08:50:11 AM »
Seebabat is cling free. Problem with seedlings is usually they cling tenaciously to the seeds and quite inferior for that reason. It's kind of like tasting one or two turpentine seedling mangos and then concluding you don't like mangos. BTW pulasan trees do get large and are very handsome trees I'll try to post a photo later. I'll mak e a convery of you yet, for now you'll just have to take my word for it, a good pulasan is almost as good as a lychee.


I think it was Seebabat I had in Malaysia. It was the best Pulasan and probably one of the best fruit I've ever had. The pulasans in PR were good but they weren't as good as the possible Seebabat that I had. Many factors could have influenced the flavor including soil, nutrients, rain, or climate so I am not sure if it was the cultivar that was just so good or the cultivar in addition to all of the other factors.

Here is a pic of the fruit, does it look like Seebabat?


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Re: Fruiting pulusan and or Rambutan via marcott in a pot!
« Reply #35 on: April 11, 2012, 06:03:44 PM »
Seebabat is cling free. Problem with seedlings is usually they cling tenaciously to the seeds and quite inferior for that reason. It's kind of like tasting one or two turpentine seedling mangos and then concluding you don't like mangos. BTW pulasan trees do get large and are very handsome trees I'll try to post a photo later. I'll mak e a convery of you yet, for now you'll just have to take my word for it, a good pulasan is almost as good as a lychee.


I think it was Seebabat I had in Malaysia. It was the best Pulasan and probably one of the best fruit I've ever had. The pulasans in PR were good but they weren't as good as the possible Seebabat that I had. Many factors could have influenced the flavor including soil, nutrients, rain, or climate so I am not sure if it was the cultivar that was just so good or the cultivar in addition to all of the other factors.

Here is a pic of the fruit, does it look like Seebabat?



Yes that is probably Seebabat. It tends to be very dark colored like that, almost black when fully ripe. BTW, this cultivar has been around for a very long time. There is a reference to it in a book: Fruit and Fruit Culture in the Dutch West Indies, published 1931.
Oscar

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Re: Fruiting pulusan and or Rambutan via marcott in a pot!
« Reply #36 on: April 11, 2012, 06:06:01 PM »
Oscar, I thought you hadn't read my post correctly...but in reviewing my post, I did not convey my sentiments that I was trying to get across regarding the Pulasan.  I am 1000% with you on the Pulasan.  I must have written this in other posts...perhaps even back on Garden Web after the Puerto Rico trip.  All of the Pulasan's that we had in Puerto Rico were good.  There were some that were better than others....but I did not have any that were no good (save for a perhaps occasional over ripe fruit). I planted seeds and entertained trying to fruit the darned thing, despite the ulta-tropicalness of it.....something that actually says volumes about what I thought of the fruit. In my present hobby mode, I gave up on this crazy pipe dream stuff in favor of the more practical and saleable.  The pulasans that I enjoyed in Puerto Rico were so much to my likeing that it rekindled the crazy desire to try to do the unheard of......fruit them out of their ultra tropical range.  I very much agree that the best pulasan is as good as any fruit i have ever had.

Harry

Oh good! You saved me the hard work of having to try to convert you!  :)
Oscar

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Re: Fruiting pulusan and or Rambutan via marcott in a pot!
« Reply #37 on: April 12, 2012, 07:01:57 AM »
Oscar...have you had any luck grafting these or do you just airlayer?  These have been proving very difficult for me and have not had a successful graft to date.  I have scions coming from two sources this week and will try again.  One thing I have noticed that not only have the grafts failed, but the rootstock dies soon after...which is a real bummer.  Any suggestions?  Thanks

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Re: Fruiting pulusan and or Rambutan via marcott in a pot!
« Reply #38 on: April 12, 2012, 05:37:25 PM »
Oscar...have you had any luck grafting these or do you just airlayer?  These have been proving very difficult for me and have not had a successful graft to date.  I have scions coming from two sources this week and will try again.  One thing I have noticed that not only have the grafts failed, but the rootstock dies soon after...which is a real bummer.  Any suggestions?  Thanks

I do airlayers as they are very easy that way and grow well. Grafting is difficult and often there are incompatibility issues or rootstock outgrowing the graft depending on what rootstock is used. If you are grafting it's a very good idea to use same cultivar, so for example if grafting Seebabt use seeds from Seebabat as rootstock. Pulasan is very trick yo grow outside of the tropics, and even here are challenging to grow. So don't feel bad if you don't succeed there!
Oscar

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Re: Fruiting pulusan and or Rambutan via marcott in a pot!
« Reply #39 on: April 30, 2012, 07:47:53 AM »
About 17 yeatrs ago I worked in a building surrounded by a govt tropical fruit research orchard that had been operational for about 100 years and was suddenly left for budget reasons.Scientists would collect the best fruit from around the world,trial them and release them to farmers.There were dozens of rambutan types left behind and 6 or 7 very good pulasans/meritams including one that looked like the type in the picture.A giant purple one was extraordinary and a huge green one was also outstanding.When the local council acquired the property trees were dozed to stop urban foragers from hurdling the fence and these and many other fruit were lost before ever being released.I never have seen pulasan as good as that again.   

 

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