Author Topic: African Pride ?  (Read 1176 times)

achetadomestica

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2176
    • FLORIDA 9b
    • View Profile
African Pride ?
« on: September 08, 2022, 07:00:04 PM »
This is from the tree I purchased as a Tim which I now believe is an African Pride
The fruit is 1 lb. 11 oz.






« Last Edit: September 09, 2022, 08:25:54 AM by achetadomestica »

skhan

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2250
    • United States, Florida, Coral Springs, 10b
    • View Profile
    • Videos of Garden
Re: African Pride
« Reply #1 on: September 08, 2022, 07:05:59 PM »
I'm no expert on IDing these but judging by the non symmetrical shape and size I would say it's in the pink mammoth line of atemoyas

achetadomestica

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2176
    • FLORIDA 9b
    • View Profile
Re: African Pride
« Reply #2 on: September 08, 2022, 09:17:21 PM »
I'm no expert on IDing these but judging by the non symmetrical shape and size I would say it's in the pink mammoth line of atemoyas
I thought the non symmetrical shape had something to do with the tree pollinating itself?
I have never got a fruit this size and the tree has fruited for 5-6 years.

Seanny

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1059
    • Garden Grove, Orange County, California, 10B
    • View Profile
Re: African Pride
« Reply #3 on: September 09, 2022, 01:01:57 AM »
Thatís not an AP.

achetadomestica

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2176
    • FLORIDA 9b
    • View Profile
Re: African Pride
« Reply #4 on: September 09, 2022, 08:24:15 AM »
Thatís not an AP.

It was sold to me as a Tim
I was told that Tim is AP?

Here's a picture of a smaller fruit from previous years















« Last Edit: September 09, 2022, 09:30:10 AM by achetadomestica »

Seanny

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1059
    • Garden Grove, Orange County, California, 10B
    • View Profile
Re: African Pride ?
« Reply #5 on: September 09, 2022, 02:39:12 PM »
Your fruit has plumb skin like a sugar apple.
Itís an atemoya.

AP is also an atemoya.
Its skin is flat like picture below.




Your fruit is not an AP.

ryanscion

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 75
    • San Diego, CA
    • View Profile
Re: African Pride ?
« Reply #6 on: September 09, 2022, 07:04:51 PM »
Your fruit has plumb skin like a sugar apple.
Itís an atemoya.

AP is also an atemoya.
Its skin is flat like picture below.




Your fruit is not an AP.


I agree with Seannyís assessment!

achetadomestica

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2176
    • FLORIDA 9b
    • View Profile
Re: African Pride ?
« Reply #7 on: September 09, 2022, 08:08:06 PM »
What do you think it is?

It was sold to me as a Tim by fruitscapes.
Last year a forum member asked Fruitscapes and they said the Tims
were actually African Prides. Is it a Tim for real? I can call them and
ask them about the Tims they sold but I think there was allot of confusion
already surrounding the Tim. I appreciate the feedback!

seng

  • ManOfFruits
  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 175
    • USA, Ca, San Diego,92126, Mira Mesa
    • View Profile
Re: African Pride ?
« Reply #8 on: September 10, 2022, 02:18:10 AM »
It is more like a PPC.

skhan

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2250
    • United States, Florida, Coral Springs, 10b
    • View Profile
    • Videos of Garden
Re: African Pride ?
« Reply #9 on: September 10, 2022, 08:27:34 AM »
What do you think it is?

It was sold to me as a Tim by fruitscapes.
Last year a forum member asked Fruitscapes and they said the Tims
were actually African Prides. Is it a Tim for real? I can call them and
ask them about the Tims they sold but I think there was allot of confusion
already surrounding the Tim. I appreciate the feedback!

I wonder if it could be tropic sun. PPC makes sense too.
Let us know if you find out anything from fruit scapes

I find IDing atemoyas pretty hard since they don't always have the same shape.
I guess the real question is how does it taste?

My mystery atemoya taste good, but it has more seeds than I would like. So far calostro and tropic sun have been the best that I have

skhan

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2250
    • United States, Florida, Coral Springs, 10b
    • View Profile
    • Videos of Garden
Re: African Pride ?
« Reply #10 on: September 10, 2022, 08:50:49 AM »
These are from a what was supposed to be arka sahan but I believe they are likely AP. (If any one wants to ID them it would be appreciated)

To make matters even more confusing.
If you look at previous threads the AP they have in CA looks a good bit different then what they are growing in AU. The general shape seems the same but the AU one is even flatter.





I'm probably going to top work this tree to something else.
I never had a bad gefner or Lisa.

mikesid

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 817
    • Zone 10B - East Boynton Beach - Florida
    • View Profile
Re: African Pride ?
« Reply #11 on: September 10, 2022, 10:25:49 AM »

Hey Mike, I think i talked to you about this before. I have one called 'Australian' I got from Fruitscapes about 5 years ago. I think you said it may be the same as your 'Tim'? I believe they said the source of the budwood was from a collector who got it in Australia??

Here are some pics from fruit on the tree:





Galatians522

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1559
    • Florida 9b
    • View Profile
Re: African Pride ?
« Reply #12 on: September 10, 2022, 02:51:54 PM »
I thought the original Australian description for African Pride might be of interest to several people on this thread. I have included it word for word below. Please note that I was not able to include the picture plate mentiond because this is hand typed. However, it looks strikingly similar to the top picture posted by Skahn. Also, (for those who do not already know) Atemoyas are called Custard Apples in Australia and ripening times will be approximately 6 months off of Florida due to being in opposite hemispheres. Also of interest is that the description for Pink's Mammoth in the same book call it "knobby" while Gefner is described as "pointed."

"African Pride was promoted in Queensland in the 1950s by Langbecker's nursery, Bundaberg. It is said to have been introduced from South Africa, but may have originated in Israel as the cultivar Kaller.

The fruit is heart-shaped or conical, small to moderate size and usually contains more seeds in relation to flesh than Pink's Mammoth. The medium-thickness skin is smoother than Pink's Mammoth and bears a series of concave, U-shaped areas like thumb-print impressions with small protuberances (areoles) (plate 2). Skin appearence can vary even between fruit on the same tree. Some fruit can have small, pointed skin segments. This variation in skin appearence could be related to tree vigour.

African Pride produces significant yields in the third year after planting. Harvesting begins in early April in the Nambour district.

Aftican Pride is a reliable cropper but a large percentage of fruit can be small in a heavy crop. Fruit size can be improved by thinning and pruning. For details, see the section on pruning.

The fruit of African Pride is considered more presentable than that of Pink's Mammoth and is easier to pack. It can be presented in single-layer trays. The tree does not exhibit the strong terminal growth of Pink's Mammoth and so is more compact.

African Pride's early consistent bearing behavior makes it the easiest and most profitable cultivar to grow in all districts of Queensland suitable for custard apples. However, it must be managed carefully to produce fruit of good size.

African Pride is the most convenient cultivar for home gardeners, because it begins fruiting only two or three years after planting, and is a smaller tree than Pink's Mammoth."

Excerpt from p.4 of
Growing Custard Apples
G.M. Sanewski
Department of Primary Industries
Queensland Government
Brisbane 1988

skhan

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2250
    • United States, Florida, Coral Springs, 10b
    • View Profile
    • Videos of Garden
Re: African Pride ?
« Reply #13 on: September 10, 2022, 06:08:31 PM »
I thought the original Australian description for African Pride might be of interest to several people on this thread. I have included it word for word below. Please note that I was not able to include the picture plate mentiond because this is hand typed. However, it looks strikingly similar to the top picture posted by Skahn. Also, (for those who do not already know) Atemoyas are called Custard Apples in Australia and ripening times will be approximately 6 months off of Florida due to being in opposite hemispheres. Also of interest is that the description for Pink's Mammoth in the same book call it "knobby" while Gefner is described as "pointed."

"African Pride was promoted in Queensland in the 1950s by Langbecker's nursery, Bundaberg. It is said to have been introduced from South Africa, but may have originated in Israel as the cultivar Kaller.

The fruit is heart-shaped or conical, small to moderate size and usually contains more seeds in relation to flesh than Pink's Mammoth. The medium-thickness skin is smoother than Pink's Mammoth and bears a series of concave, U-shaped areas like thumb-print impressions with small protuberances (areoles) (plate 2). Skin appearence can vary even between fruit on the same tree. Some fruit can have small, pointed skin segments. This variation in skin appearence could be related to tree vigour.

African Pride produces significant yields in the third year after planting. Harvesting begins in early April in the Nambour district.

Aftican Pride is a reliable cropper but a large percentage of fruit can be small in a heavy crop. Fruit size can be improved by thinning and pruning. For details, see the section on pruning.

The fruit of African Pride is considered more presentable than that of Pink's Mammoth and is easier to pack. It can be presented in single-layer trays. The tree does not exhibit the strong terminal growth of Pink's Mammoth and so is more compact.

African Pride's early consistent bearing behavior makes it the easiest and most profitable cultivar to grow in all districts of Queensland suitable for custard apples. However, it must be managed carefully to produce fruit of good size.

African Pride is the most convenient cultivar for home gardeners, because it begins fruiting only two or three years after planting, and is a smaller tree than Pink's Mammoth."

Excerpt from p.4 of
Growing Custard Apples
G.M. Sanewski
Department of Primary Industries
Queensland Government
Brisbane 1988

Thanks for digging that up.
The main reason I don't like the one that I think is AP is because of all the seeds.
The flavor is more cherimoya then the rest I ate so far.
This description makes me a little more certain what I have is AP

Galatians522

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1559
    • Florida 9b
    • View Profile
Re: African Pride ?
« Reply #14 on: September 10, 2022, 10:32:50 PM »
Skhan,

I have never grown AP, but it sure seems like your fruit matches the description. How does the flavor on your AP suspect compare to Gefner? One thing that I really like about Gefner is the more Cherimoya like texture. It makes seeding slices much easier.

With regards to Tim, I don't know what it is, but nothing about the Tim tree we have lines up with the above description??? The tree exibits strong apical dominance and high vigor as a young grafted tree. Most fruits have lower seed count when compared to Gefner and are not symmetrical. The skin is by far the thickest of any Atemoya I have tried (Lisa, Gefner, and Dream being the others). Tim also has the largest fruits of the three when well pollinated, but has consistently set the fewest fruits. The flavor is outstanding, though. Maybe it is one of the Australian hybrids between PM and AP?

spaugh

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4931
    • San Diego County California
    • View Profile
Re: African Pride ?
« Reply #15 on: September 10, 2022, 10:42:22 PM »
Sayyod your mislabeled fruit does look like Aap but they look small.  Maybe they are not near maturity yet
  Thry get really big and the skin turns slightly yellow and oozes with sugar and feels sticky when its ripe. 
Brad Spaugh

 

SMF spam blocked by CleanTalk