Author Topic: Most Reliable Mango Varieties for South Florida (Not Dependent on Cold Weather)  (Read 2669 times)

johnb51

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Which are the mango varieties that will set fruit every year in South Florida and do not depend on a certain kind of winter weather to stimulate blossoming?  Since we can no longer depend on consistent periods of cold in the winter, I think this would be good information to have.  Are Angie, Pickering, Cac, Honey Kiss, Little Gem, Sugarloaf, M-4, Orange Sherbet, PPK, and Lemon Zest in this group?  Others?  Thank you.  (I hope Alex reads this.)
John

JR561

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Dwarf Hawaiian and Rosa are the first two I think of here.

Happy to see this thread, this is something we have been talking about this week at my house.

roblack

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Agreed, great thread idea. Might be a bit early to tell for some varieties.

Sugar Loaf has been flowering and fruiting for me (young tree/7 feet), but didn't hold all the way last year. Would have, but was attacked by critters, and other fruits dropped early. Based upon the other varieties we are growing, I have hope that SL is an easy fruiter.

Glenn had been a good and consistent producer up until the last couple of years. One year was my fault (over-fert), but think it was thrown off by last year's weather and mild winter. Curious if this tree will get back in gear.

Orange Sherbert seems finicky so far. Same with guava, ndm4, and coco cream. Even Kesar was a weak producer last year. Could also be a maturity issue. Time will tell.
« Last Edit: December 31, 2022, 06:24:51 PM by roblack »

CowboyFig

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M4 seems to always be putting out maximum bloom. Granted I’m in Central Florida, but it seems to want to push full bloom in December before we’ve even had cold weather yet. I’d imagine y’all would have good success with it down south.

Honest Abe

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Great thread.

Im 99.9 percent certain that Alex Salazar has stated to Me that you certainly add these to the list of mango trees that flower annually with no substantial cold:


-Pickering
-Rosigold
-Dwarf Hawaiian





I don’t want to state others that I’ve heard him talk about because I can’t risk false information.


johnb51

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Great thread.

Im 99.9 percent certain that Alex Salazar has stated to Me that you certainly add these to the list of mango trees that flower annually with no substantial cold:


-Pickering
-Rosigold
-Dwarf Hawaiian





I don’t want to state others that I’ve heard him talk about because I can’t risk false information.
Like I said, I hope he'll read and comment because he definitely has the most experience and knowledge!  :)
John

Mangolover765

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I know Alex has mentioned the edward as being a mango variety that blooms easily.

skhan

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Anything thats early season you can generally include in this list. Edward for example.
I this point most of my trees give me a pretty consistent crop.
Ndm and manilta were the only one that didn't and they are in the process of being top worked.
Glenn has been disappointing as well.

CAC hasnt given me a full bloom in the last two years but I still get a lot of from fruit whatever bloom it does set.

Mangolover765

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Anything thats early season you can generally include in this list. Edward for example.
I this point most of my trees give me a pretty consistent crop.
Ndm and manilta were the only one that didn't and they are in the process of being top worked.
Glenn has been disappointing as well.

CAC hasnt given me a full bloom in the last two years but I still get a lot of from fruit whatever bloom it does set.

What varieties are your best producers?

skhan

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Anything thats early season you can generally include in this list. Edward for example.
I this point most of my trees give me a pretty consistent crop.
Ndm and manilta were the only one that didn't and they are in the process of being top worked.
Glenn has been disappointing as well.

CAC hasnt given me a full bloom in the last two years but I still get a lot of from fruit whatever bloom it does set.

What varieties are your best producers?

Based on my personal experience
If i take the size and age of the tree into consideration, I'd say, Angie, Keitt, Zinc, Fruit Punch.
Edward, Thai everbearing, and Cac have also been really good but not branch-breaking productions.
Peach Cobbler has produced a lot in the last two years but I'm not that big of a fan of the mango
M4, Cotton Candy, Sugar Loaf, Venus, and Honey kiss have done pretty well but the tree or multi-graft branches are not big enough for me to pass judgment
Glenn and Cogshall are kinda hit or miss (Removing both)
Neelam is an alternative bearer but at least produces something every year


Alex (Squam, TropicalAcresFarm) has plenty of information about what generally works and doesn't in Soflo, best resource IMO

Squam256

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I currently have 5 grades for ease of flowering for mango in south Florida:. A few examples provided with each category. Some are disputable as to which group they belong but this is a rough projection based on recent past behavior. Stem age plays a major role as well, and I can’t emphasize enough that you want to get your pruning done before the end of August here to avoid late flushes of growth, and to avoid over feeding the trees to lessen the likelihood of that as well.

Grade 1/Very Easy : These are precocious, and frequently blooming before the New Year regardless of what kind of weather we see. Rosigold, Edward, Dwarf Hawaiian, Rosa

/Grade 2/Easy : these can achieve decent blooms off less than a week below 60F depending on the age of their stems. A solid week will make most of them achieve majority blooms.
Angie, Pickering, Ah Ping, Jean Ellen, Ice Cream, Super Julie

Grade 3/ Medium some bloom after a week or less but not majority of canopy depending on stem age. 10 days with lows below 60F is typically enough to get a majority bloom.
Haden, Bailey’s Marvel, Glenn, most Thai mangos and most old Florida varieties

Grade 4/ Difficult Will flower inconsistently unless they receive multi-week cold fronts. Usually very unprecocious. Sweet Tart, Alphonso, Mulgoba, Peach Cobbler, Bombay

Grade 5/ Extremely Difficult/ Near Impossible These likely require 2+ weeks *untinterupted* lows in the 50s/40s plus optimal stem age and 6+ years of total tree maturity to achieve full blooms here(growth flush needs to be hardened off before end of August and cold front must be January or later). In reality, Most winters here they’ll either fail to bloom completely or just throw a couple panicles here or there. Sindhri, Dasheri, Gilas, Anything from northern India or Pakistan.




Groups 3 and 4 are the problem for people in Palm Beach, Broward, and Miami-Dade, and maybe even the Treasure Coast now too. Due to a lot of trees in the nursery trade being in those categories.

On the other hand, trees in group 4 and 5 should do well in California and some group 4 maybe central /West Florida


johnb51

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Thank you, Alex!
John

Honest Abe

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Excellent information thank you Alex.

When you say “most old Florida varieties”
Does that include most of the newer Gary Zill varieties parentage and therefore most of those varieties into group 3?

roblack

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Thanks Alex for the great info, and again John for this thread.

Got a nice sized Edward coming tomorrow. Have always loved this mango, and need a more consistent producer to rely on. Chop goes the guanabana tree.

MasonG31

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There’s a Brazilian variety called ‘Espada’ that produces heavily near the equator of Brazil (temps rarely go below 60).  When I was there, locals would rave about it, and many said it was their favorite mango.  Apparently it’s polyembryonic since lots of places had seedlings planted all over, and the fruit looked the same on all the trees.  I thought it was a pretty good mango too.  Might be worth growing in South Florida given the lack of cold there.

paulmctigue

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Wow, very detailed and scholarly data Alex! I might add that for me, zone 10b Sweet Tart and Florigon have never failed to bloom for me in the last 6-7 years, as well as Dot for the last 20 years
« Last Edit: January 05, 2023, 08:32:24 AM by paulmctigue »

bovine421

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I find that the West Indian varieties bloom easier for me such as Graham Julie Buxton spice Little Gem Ice Cream Ceci Love. The blooming in Central Florida and South Florida may not be that much of a difference Last season Sweet Tart wanted to grow not bloom. Does that sound familiar
Tete Nene Julie Juliet Carrie Ice Cream Coconut Cream Little Gem  Dot  Mallika PPK  OS  Pina Colada Cotton Candy Buxton Spice Karen Michelle M-4 Beverly Marc Anthony White Pirie Lychee Cherilata Plantain Barbados Cherry

bovine421

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I currently have 5 grades for ease of flowering for mango in south Florida:. A few examples provided with each category. Some are disputable as to which group they belong but this is a rough projection based on recent past behavior. Stem age plays a major role as well, and I can’t emphasize enough that you want to get your pruning done before the end of August here to avoid late flushes of growth, and to avoid over feeding the trees to lessen the likelihood of that as well.

Grade 1/Very Easy : These are precocious, and frequently blooming before the New Year regardless of what kind of weather we see. Rosigold, Edward, Dwarf Hawaiian, Rosa

/Grade 2/Easy : these can achieve decent blooms off less than a week below 60F depending on the age of their stems. A solid week will make most of them achieve majority blooms.
Angie, Pickering, Ah Ping, Jean Ellen, Ice Cream, Super Julie

Grade 3/ Medium some bloom after a week or less but not majority of canopy depending on stem age. 10 days with lows below 60F is typically enough to get a majority bloom.
Haden, Bailey’s Marvel, Glenn, most Thai mangos and most old Florida varieties

Grade 4/ Difficult Will flower inconsistently unless they receive multi-week cold fronts. Usually very unprecocious. Sweet Tart, Alphonso, Mulgoba, Peach Cobbler, Bombay

Grade 5/ Extremely Difficult/ Near Impossible These likely require 2+ weeks *untinterupted* lows in the 50s/40s plus optimal stem age and 6+ years of total tree maturity to achieve full blooms here(growth flush needs to be hardened off before end of August and cold front must be January or later). In reality, Most winters here they’ll either fail to bloom completely or just throw a couple panicles here or there. Sindhri, Dasheri, Gilas, Anything from northern India or Pakistan.




Groups 3 and 4 are the problem for people in Palm Beach, Broward, and Miami-Dade, and maybe even the Treasure Coast now too. Due to a lot of trees in the nursery trade being in those categories.

On the other hand, trees in group 4 and 5 should do well in California and some group 4 maybe central /West Florida
I find this thread very useful and with the undeniable trend of warmer Winters I've reevaluated and will totally top work Super Julie to one of my top tier mature trees. I will not mention the variety because Thou shalt not speak ill of the Zill but this is the second season it has failed to bloom
« Last Edit: March 03, 2023, 06:01:08 AM by bovine421 »
Tete Nene Julie Juliet Carrie Ice Cream Coconut Cream Little Gem  Dot  Mallika PPK  OS  Pina Colada Cotton Candy Buxton Spice Karen Michelle M-4 Beverly Marc Anthony White Pirie Lychee Cherilata Plantain Barbados Cherry

bovine421

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I currently have 5 grades for ease of flowering for mango in south Florida:. A few examples provided with each category. Some are disputable as to which group they belong but this is a rough projection based on recent past behavior. Stem age plays a major role as well, and I can’t emphasize enough that you want to get your pruning done before the end of August here to avoid late flushes of growth, and to avoid over feeding the trees to lessen the likelihood of that as well.

Grade 1/Very Easy : These are precocious, and frequently blooming before the New Year regardless of what kind of weather we see. Rosigold, Edward, Dwarf Hawaiian, Rosa

/Grade 2/Easy : these can achieve decent blooms off less than a week below 60F depending on the age of their stems. A solid week will make most of them achieve majority blooms.
Angie, Pickering, Ah Ping, Jean Ellen, Ice Cream, Super Julie

Grade 3/ Medium some bloom after a week or less but not majority of canopy depending on stem age. 10 days with lows below 60F is typically enough to get a majority bloom.
Haden, Bailey’s Marvel, Glenn, most Thai mangos and most old Florida varieties

Grade 4/ Difficult Will flower inconsistently unless they receive multi-week cold fronts. Usually very unprecocious. Sweet Tart, Alphonso, Mulgoba, Peach Cobbler, Bombay

Grade 5/ Extremely Difficult/ Near Impossible These likely require 2+ weeks *untinterupted* lows in the 50s/40s plus optimal stem age and 6+ years of total tree maturity to achieve full blooms here(growth flush needs to be hardened off before end of August and cold front must be January or later). In reality, Most winters here they’ll either fail to bloom completely or just throw a couple panicles here or there. Sindhri, Dasheri, Gilas, Anything from northern India or Pakistan.




Groups 3 and 4 are the problem for people in Palm Beach, Broward, and Miami-Dade, and maybe even the Treasure Coast now too. Due to a lot of trees in the nursery trade being in those categories.

On the other hand, trees in group 4 and 5 should do well in California and some group 4 maybe central /West Florida
I find this thread very useful and with the undeniable trend of warmer Winters I've reevaluated and will totally top work Super Julie to one of my top tier mature trees. I will not mention the variety because Thou shalt not speak ill of the Zill but this is the second season it has failed to bloom
Say hello to what will be topped work to what I  will call Sweet super Julie.

A finicky bloomer which had zero bloom last season and only one bloom this season. Thanks to the pickleball player on the Atlantic side I am sold and a believer in Super Julie or Super Delicious Julie
https://youtu.be/wB9YIsKIEbA



« Last Edit: March 15, 2023, 10:55:44 PM by bovine421 »
Tete Nene Julie Juliet Carrie Ice Cream Coconut Cream Little Gem  Dot  Mallika PPK  OS  Pina Colada Cotton Candy Buxton Spice Karen Michelle M-4 Beverly Marc Anthony White Pirie Lychee Cherilata Plantain Barbados Cherry

bovine421

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I currently have 5 grades for ease of flowering for mango in south Florida:. A few examples provided with each category. Some are disputable as to which group they belong but this is a rough projection based on recent past behavior. Stem age plays a major role as well, and I can’t emphasize enough that you want to get your pruning done before the end of August here to avoid late flushes of growth, and to avoid over feeding the trees to lessen the likelihood of that as well.

Grade 1/Very Easy : These are precocious, and frequently blooming before the New Year regardless of what kind of weather we see. Rosigold, Edward, Dwarf Hawaiian, Rosa

/Grade 2/Easy : these can achieve decent blooms off less than a week below 60F depending on the age of their stems. A solid week will make most of them achieve majority blooms.
Angie, Pickering, Ah Ping, Jean Ellen, Ice Cream, Super Julie

Grade 3/ Medium some bloom after a week or less but not majority of canopy depending on stem age. 10 days with lows below 60F is typically enough to get a majority bloom.
Haden, Bailey’s Marvel, Glenn, most Thai mangos and most old Florida varieties

Grade 4/ Difficult Will flower inconsistently unless they receive multi-week cold fronts. Usually very unprecocious. Sweet Tart, Alphonso, Mulgoba, Peach Cobbler, Bombay

Grade 5/ Extremely Difficult/ Near Impossible These likely require 2+ weeks *untinterupted* lows in the 50s/40s plus optimal stem age and 6+ years of total tree maturity to achieve full blooms here(growth flush needs to be hardened off before end of August and cold front must be January or later). In reality, Most winters here they’ll either fail to bloom completely or just throw a couple panicles here or there. Sindhri, Dasheri, Gilas, Anything from northern India or Pakistan.




Groups 3 and 4 are the problem for people in Palm Beach, Broward, and Miami-Dade, and maybe even the Treasure Coast now too. Due to a lot of trees in the nursery trade being in those categories.

On the other hand, trees in group 4 and 5 should do well in California and some group 4 maybe central /West Florida
Which grade would Sonpari fall into. Contemplating on ordering some budwood to graft onto my two remaining warm winter bloom hesitant trees 🙂
I know two seasons doesn't make a trend but on the northwest side of those trees they seem to be dormant and hesitant to Bloom so to hedge my bet I may graft a few scions of a different variety but I'm very glad that John51 started this thread. His timing is impeccable
« Last Edit: March 17, 2023, 06:28:18 AM by bovine421 »
Tete Nene Julie Juliet Carrie Ice Cream Coconut Cream Little Gem  Dot  Mallika PPK  OS  Pina Colada Cotton Candy Buxton Spice Karen Michelle M-4 Beverly Marc Anthony White Pirie Lychee Cherilata Plantain Barbados Cherry

johnb51

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Alex says Sonpari performs better than its parents so you might have good luck with it.
John

zands

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From Alex:
Grade 4/ Difficult Will flower inconsistently unless they receive multi-week cold fronts. Usually very unprecocious. Sweet Tart, Alphonso, Mulgoba, Peach Cobbler, Bombay

Not much cold this year. My sweet tart had excellent bloom and many small mangoes now. It is 11 years old. So maybe age is a factor. It had tremendous production in 2021. Nothing much in 2022

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I almost have come to believe there are two sweet tart lines, one that will fruit if you as much as look at it the wrong way and the other that may be a little more discriminating in fruiting.

roblack

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Glad my ST tree is holding fruit, phew! =)

Pretty young, but growing fast. 10+ feet and in-ground about 2 years or so (from a 3g). 1st time it has flowered/fruited. 

Squam256

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I currently have 5 grades for ease of flowering for mango in south Florida:. A few examples provided with each category. Some are disputable as to which group they belong but this is a rough projection based on recent past behavior. Stem age plays a major role as well, and I can’t emphasize enough that you want to get your pruning done before the end of August here to avoid late flushes of growth, and to avoid over feeding the trees to lessen the likelihood of that as well.

Grade 1/Very Easy : These are precocious, and frequently blooming before the New Year regardless of what kind of weather we see. Rosigold, Edward, Dwarf Hawaiian, Rosa

/Grade 2/Easy : these can achieve decent blooms off less than a week below 60F depending on the age of their stems. A solid week will make most of them achieve majority blooms.
Angie, Pickering, Ah Ping, Jean Ellen, Ice Cream, Super Julie

Grade 3/ Medium some bloom after a week or less but not majority of canopy depending on stem age. 10 days with lows below 60F is typically enough to get a majority bloom.
Haden, Bailey’s Marvel, Glenn, most Thai mangos and most old Florida varieties

Grade 4/ Difficult Will flower inconsistently unless they receive multi-week cold fronts. Usually very unprecocious. Sweet Tart, Alphonso, Mulgoba, Peach Cobbler, Bombay

Grade 5/ Extremely Difficult/ Near Impossible These likely require 2+ weeks *untinterupted* lows in the 50s/40s plus optimal stem age and 6+ years of total tree maturity to achieve full blooms here(growth flush needs to be hardened off before end of August and cold front must be January or later). In reality, Most winters here they’ll either fail to bloom completely or just throw a couple panicles here or there. Sindhri, Dasheri, Gilas, Anything from northern India or Pakistan.




Groups 3 and 4 are the problem for people in Palm Beach, Broward, and Miami-Dade, and maybe even the Treasure Coast now too. Due to a lot of trees in the nursery trade being in those categories.

On the other hand, trees in group 4 and 5 should do well in California and some group 4 maybe central /West Florida
Which grade would Sonpari fall into. Contemplating on ordering some budwood to graft onto my two remaining warm winter bloom hesitant trees 🙂
I know two seasons doesn't make a trend but on the northwest side of those trees they seem to be dormant and hesitant to Bloom so to hedge my bet I may graft a few scions of a different variety but I'm very glad that John51 started this thread. His timing is impeccable

I would probably put Sonpari in group 3.

 

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