Author Topic: Amrapali Mango  (Read 4592 times)

Felipe

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Amrapali Mango
« on: August 13, 2013, 06:19:01 PM »
I rencently planted an Amrapali mango. Has anybody come across this cultivar? I have not tasted it, I only had the chance to see one unripe fruit:



This is my new plant:



plantlover13

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Re: Amrapali Mango
« Reply #1 on: August 13, 2013, 06:27:31 PM »
It should be like mallika, i guess, since i read that it is also a cross between dusheri and Neelam.

Felipe

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Re: Amrapali Mango
« Reply #2 on: August 14, 2013, 07:49:48 AM »
I have no reference that Mallika and Amrapali could be the same cultivar. The fruit on the picture does not look like the Mallikas I have seen...

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Re: Amrapali Mango
« Reply #3 on: August 14, 2013, 08:40:22 AM »
I don't think that they are the same, just siblings, so they may have similar characteristics.

nileshkwr

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Re: Amrapali Mango
« Reply #4 on: December 14, 2020, 10:27:56 PM »
Any updates?

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Re: Amrapali Mango
« Reply #5 on: December 14, 2020, 10:36:46 PM »
We grow Amrapali and itís outstanding. Different flavor than Mallika though, and probably sweeter than Mallika.

It needs to be eaten when itís firm. By the time it is ďregular ripeĒ for most mangos, itís overripe.






bovine421

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Re: Amrapali Mango
« Reply #6 on: December 18, 2020, 08:37:57 AM »
We grow Amrapali and itís outstanding. Different flavor than Mallika though, and probably sweeter than Mallika.

It needs to be eaten when itís firm. By the time it is ďregular ripeĒ for most mangos, itís overripe.





Does Amrapali have any hint of melon or Citrus flavor?
Once again thanks for the Ambika. It was much better than I expected any chance it is a late-season variety :)
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Re: Amrapali Mango
« Reply #7 on: December 19, 2020, 11:57:50 AM »
We grow Amrapali and itís outstanding. Different flavor than Mallika though, and probably sweeter than Mallika.

It needs to be eaten when itís firm. By the time it is ďregular ripeĒ for most mangos, itís overripe.





Does Amrapali have any hint of melon or Citrus flavor?
Once again thanks for the Ambika. It was much better than I expected any chance it is a late-season variety :)

Possibly both actually. I have had a difficult time classifying Amrapaliís flavor. There are a few mangos which similarly have a unique enough or variable enough flavor that itís tough to compare them to others specifically. The so-called Taymour is another thatís like that.

I detected 3 flavor groups in some of the Amrapali we ate this year: citrus, classical and West Indian all seemed to be present, and the stage of ripeness may have a big impact on what dominates.

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Re: Amrapali Mango
« Reply #8 on: December 30, 2020, 02:17:47 PM »
I rencently planted an Amrapali mango. Has anybody come across this cultivar? I have not tasted it, I only had the chance to see one unripe fruit:



This is my new plant:




Amrapalli is one of the premium Hybrid mango in South east Asia derived from
Dasheri (Dashahari, Dusheri also called) and Neelam. Mallika is also come from the same parent where they switched the pollinating parents.
You can't justify the flavor of Amrapalli with citrus, melon and honey, it has something unique which Mallika is missing. Definitely, it doesn't have the carrot flavor Mallika exerts. And for Mallika, no matter what you do harvesting them in SoFLa and SoCal green or ripe, its not even close to its counterpart in Indian subcontinent. But in western hemisphere, Mallika's productivity is outstanding. I top worked my Mallika and Alfonso years ago.
The flesh of Amrapalli is deep orange, juicy, few fibers  under the skin and intensely sweet. There is no sub acid component to it. It is a super sweet, aromatic, spicy,    little piney and a complex flavor all the way. The TSS% is close to 25.
Keep in mind that this phenomenal mango shows those attributes only in Indian Subcontinent (Bangladesh, India and Pakistan). When It comes to Florida condition, surely, it is missing those flavor profiles due heavy rain from late April to June. I've been propagating the variety for last 5 years and had fruit in preceding 2 years. My close observation while propagating this cultivar is that it doesn't like rain that much, the condition where it derived from. I taste tested this variety all over the Indian Subcontinent and also in Florida. I can definitely, conclude with the inference that it still retains 60-70% of the flavor profile in SoFla. Perhaps, it might be little better in SoCal for not having that much rain there.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TcEV4iCPW58


bovine421

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Re: Amrapali Mango
« Reply #9 on: December 30, 2020, 03:15:52 PM »
In your assessment would you say it is more picker friendly then Malika. As in when and how long to let it set for Peak flavor.

Do you think the soil may effect  flavor profile?
« Last Edit: December 30, 2020, 03:21:29 PM by bovine421 »
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bovine421

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Re: Amrapali Mango
« Reply #10 on: December 30, 2020, 08:13:51 PM »
I rencently planted an Amrapali mango. Has anybody come across this cultivar? I have not tasted it, I only had the chance to see one unripe fruit:



This is my new plant:




Amrapalli is one of the premium Hybrid mango in South east Asia derived from
Dasheri (Dashahari, Dusheri also called) and Neelam. Mallika is also come from the same parent where they switched the pollinating parents.
You can't justify the flavor of Amrapalli with citrus, melon and honey, it has something unique which Mallika is missing. Definitely, it doesn't have the carrot flavor Mallika exerts. And for Mallika, no matter what you do harvesting them in SoFLa and SoCal green or ripe, its not even close to its counterpart in Indian subcontinent. But in western hemisphere, Mallika's productivity is outstanding. I top worked my Mallika and Alfonso years ago.
The flesh of Amrapalli is deep orange, juicy, few fibers  under the skin and intensely sweet. There is no sub acid component to it. It is a super sweet, aromatic, spicy,    little piney and a complex flavor all the way. The TSS% is close to 25.
Keep in mind that this phenomenal mango shows those attributes only in Indian Subcontinent (Bangladesh, India and Pakistan). When It comes to Florida condition, surely, it is missing those flavor profiles due heavy rain from late April to June. I've been propagating the variety for last 5 years and had fruit in preceding 2 years. My close observation while propagating this cultivar is that it doesn't like rain that much, the condition where it derived from. I taste tested this variety all over the Indian Subcontinent and also in Florida. I can definitely, conclude with the inference that it still retains 60-70% of the flavor profile in SoFla. Perhaps, it might be little better in SoCal for not having that much rain there.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TcEV4iCPW58
I was hoping to extract more information about this mango from you since you seem to have experience with it. To me what makes my Mallika mangos unique is its consistent cantaloupe melon flavor. To say that Amrapali has something that Malika does not is a little abstract  If it is just sweeter and a little more resinous then it falls into a category with a lot of other mangoes. Could you elaborate a little more on this variety grown in Florida I've been intrigued about amrapali for quite a while but never had the opportunity to taste it :)

Are there any similarities in the procedure to harvest  and Storage for Peak flavor?
« Last Edit: December 30, 2020, 08:35:53 PM by bovine421 »
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Re: Amrapali Mango
« Reply #11 on: December 31, 2020, 03:54:28 PM »
In your assessment would you say it is more picker friendly then Malika. As in when and how long to let it set for Peak flavor.

Do you think the soil may effect  flavor profile?


When I had my Mallika tree and had fruits on it I waited till the fruits break color to a little hue of yellow on the green skin. Then I used to harvest them and put on the counter top for 7-12 days depending on the maturity and surface area of that particular fruit for a good color change to pale yellow. Don't let it ripe all the way. I used  to eat them when it was still little giving and not became completely yellow. Its like yellow and green mixed together and still little giving. It is supposed to be the right way to ripen this variety. I also, tried the Indian way, where I harvested my fruits mature green and waited for the color change. The eating quality of this fruit completely, depends on when you harvest(has to be in maturity. "when to pick mangos" That would be another topic) and how long and how you ripen this Mallika.
In India, it is a different story how they ripen Mallika where they pick them mature green and put them in a worm shady place in a cardboard box or laying them on the floor on top of thick layer of hays. Camel dung theory is obsolete these days.

Some claim that it doesn't make any difference if you let it ripe on the tree. But in general, mangos need to be harvested mature green when they show the signs of maturity and develop the right "Percent Brix" specially the Indian Cultivars.

Compared to Mallika, Amrapalli is on the little dwarf side, doesn't have the lanky limbs, precocious(like pickering but it is way superior to it)),Cantaloupe melon flavor is really low which was obtained from Neelam(In Mallika the female parent is Neelam),don't get musty and sometimes don't put forth carrot flavor when it is more ripe.

Some fruit enthusiasts, mango connoisseurs claim their Mallika to be excellent. Maybe, they got lucky having high humidity, less rain and a balanced soil where they have an optimum soil conditions and the soil pH ranges between 6.0-7.0. There is no problem with micronutrient absorption specially Iron and Manganese and macro like phosphorus. In Alkaline conditions, N,K and S absorption are near ok except for P which will react with Ca and Mg in ionic level and will become less soluble. On the contrary, at acidic pH value, P ion will react with Al and Fe to form less soluble compounds.

My soil is little over 7 where I tried to correct that with peat moss and sulfur. Peat moss helps the soil hold nutrients by increasing what is called the CEC or "cation exchange capacity". Then I tried the chelated form of micronutrients until the alkalinity(high pH) went little down.

Anyways, a delicious mango must have few common attributes like signature mango flavor profile(mango flavor all the way being little resinous and/or piney, doesn't matter if it is Chinese, Indochinese or a  south east Asian variety), very good shelf life, very good texture (fiber less and creamy would be appreciated),good color inside and outside, high TSS%(may balance out with any tartness; super sweetness may not be a denominator where there are other characteristics in the flavor spectrum). One should not mind if the specimen has been enhanced with coconut, citrus, melon,
and peach flavor.

I do understand, that Mallika falls under these broad spectrum of flavor profiles in its native environment(India). Unfortunately, due to the conditions in western hemisphere(soil, humidity and rain) it turned into a mediocre mango where(for those who've taste tested these two cultivars in both parts of the world) Amrapalli(small  to medium sized) a little bit better in SoFL conditions retaining 60-70% of its original flavors compared to the Indian version.


bovine421

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Re: Amrapali Mango
« Reply #12 on: December 31, 2020, 04:41:17 PM »
In your assessment would you say it is more picker friendly then Malika. As in when and how long to let it set for Peak flavor.

Do you think the soil may effect  flavor profile?


When I had my Mallika tree and had fruits on it I waited till the fruits break color to a little hue of yellow on the green skin. Then I used to harvest them and put on the counter top for 7-12 days depending on the maturity and surface area of that particular fruit for a good color change to pale yellow. Don't let it ripe all the way. I used  to eat them when it was still little giving and not became completely yellow. Its like yellow and green mixed together and still little giving. It is supposed to be the right way to ripen this variety. I also, tried the Indian way, where I harvested my fruits mature green and waited for the color change. The eating quality of this fruit completely, depends on when you harvest(has to be in maturity. "when to pick mangos" That would be another topic) and how long and how you ripen this Mallika.
In India, it is a different story how they ripen Mallika where they pick them mature green and put them in a worm shady place in a cardboard box or laying them on the floor on top of thick layer of hays. Camel dung theory is obsolete these days.

Some claim that it doesn't make any difference if you let it ripe on the tree. But in general, mangos need to be harvested mature green when they show the signs of maturity and develop the right "Percent Brix" specially the Indian Cultivars.

Compared to Mallika, Amrapalli is on the little dwarf side, doesn't have the lanky limbs, precocious(like pickering but it is way superior to it)),Cantaloupe melon flavor is really low which was obtained from Neelam(In Mallika the female parent is Neelam),don't get musty and sometimes don't put forth carrot flavor when it is more ripe.

Some fruit enthusiasts, mango connoisseurs claim their Mallika to be excellent. Maybe, they got lucky having high humidity, less rain and a balanced soil where they have an optimum soil conditions and the soil pH ranges between 6.0-7.0. There is no problem with micronutrient absorption specially Iron and Manganese and macro like phosphorus. In Alkaline conditions, N,K and S absorption are near ok except for P which will react with Ca and Mg in ionic level and will become less soluble. On the contrary, at acidic pH value, P ion will react with Al and Fe to form less soluble compounds.

My soil is little over 7 where I tried to correct that with peat moss and sulfur. Peat moss helps the soil hold nutrients by increasing what is called the CEC or "cation exchange capacity". Then I tried the chelated form of micronutrients until the alkalinity(high pH) went little down.

Anyways, a delicious mango must have few common attributes like signature mango flavor profile(mango flavor all the way being little resinous and/or piney, doesn't matter if it is Chinese, Indochinese or a  south east Asian variety), very good shelf life, very good texture (fiber less and creamy would be appreciated),good color inside and outside, high TSS%(may balance out with any tartness; super sweetness may not be a denominator where there are other characteristics in the flavor spectrum). One should not mind if the specimen has been enhanced with coconut, citrus, melon,
and peach flavor.

I do understand, that Mallika falls under these broad spectrum of flavor profiles in its native environment(India). Unfortunately, due to the conditions in western hemisphere(soil, humidity and rain) it turned into a mediocre mango where(for those who've taste tested these two cultivars in both parts of the world) Amrapalli(small  to medium sized) a little bit better in SoFL conditions retaining 60-70% of its original flavors compared to the Indian version.
Thank you for taking the time to answer my question hopefully I didn't come across as being snarky. From what you said I think that Malika performs better in Central Florida. We receive about 12 in less annual rainfall than South Florida but we have higher humidity. The reason I mentioned soil because when I think of India I think of very rich fertile soil. I am blessed to have a silty loam with a clay component here in Osceola County that trees really seem to love. That may be why my Malika taste so excellent. We wait for the first stripe of yellow and a yellow ring around the stem then we pick put it in a cardboard box for 7 to 10 days. We call that Finney for finish in Creole. I have read  other Forum members who have multiple Groves say that a variety can taste different in each Groove that  maybe only 20 miles apart. Others have said that Malika can sometimes just have an off year but fortunately that has not happened to me. Checking my notes I see where I plan on grafting  some Ambika to Malika and  Amrapila to the Neelam . Just thinking and talking of mangoes brings me much joy thanks so much :)

« Last Edit: December 31, 2020, 05:09:49 PM by bovine421 »
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Re: Amrapali Mango
« Reply #13 on: January 01, 2021, 11:19:20 AM »
In your assessment would you say it is more picker friendly then Malika. As in when and how long to let it set for Peak flavor.

Do you think the soil may effect  flavor profile?


When I had my Mallika tree and had fruits on it I waited till the fruits break color to a little hue of yellow on the green skin. Then I used to harvest them and put on the counter top for 7-12 days depending on the maturity and surface area of that particular fruit for a good color change to pale yellow. Don't let it ripe all the way. I used  to eat them when it was still little giving and not became completely yellow. Its like yellow and green mixed together and still little giving. It is supposed to be the right way to ripen this variety. I also, tried the Indian way, where I harvested my fruits mature green and waited for the color change. The eating quality of this fruit completely, depends on when you harvest(has to be in maturity. "when to pick mangos" That would be another topic) and how long and how you ripen this Mallika.
In India, it is a different story how they ripen Mallika where they pick them mature green and put them in a worm shady place in a cardboard box or laying them on the floor on top of thick layer of hays. Camel dung theory is obsolete these days.

Some claim that it doesn't make any difference if you let it ripe on the tree. But in general, mangos need to be harvested mature green when they show the signs of maturity and develop the right "Percent Brix" specially the Indian Cultivars.

Compared to Mallika, Amrapalli is on the little dwarf side, doesn't have the lanky limbs, precocious(like pickering but it is way superior to it)),Cantaloupe melon flavor is really low which was obtained from Neelam(In Mallika the female parent is Neelam),don't get musty and sometimes don't put forth carrot flavor when it is more ripe.

Some fruit enthusiasts, mango connoisseurs claim their Mallika to be excellent. Maybe, they got lucky having high humidity, less rain and a balanced soil where they have an optimum soil conditions and the soil pH ranges between 6.0-7.0. There is no problem with micronutrient absorption specially Iron and Manganese and macro like phosphorus. In Alkaline conditions, N,K and S absorption are near ok except for P which will react with Ca and Mg in ionic level and will become less soluble. On the contrary, at acidic pH value, P ion will react with Al and Fe to form less soluble compounds.

My soil is little over 7 where I tried to correct that with peat moss and sulfur. Peat moss helps the soil hold nutrients by increasing what is called the CEC or "cation exchange capacity". Then I tried the chelated form of micronutrients until the alkalinity(high pH) went little down.

Anyways, a delicious mango must have few common attributes like signature mango flavor profile(mango flavor all the way being little resinous and/or piney, doesn't matter if it is Chinese, Indochinese or a  south east Asian variety), very good shelf life, very good texture (fiber less and creamy would be appreciated),good color inside and outside, high TSS%(may balance out with any tartness; super sweetness may not be a denominator where there are other characteristics in the flavor spectrum). One should not mind if the specimen has been enhanced with coconut, citrus, melon,
and peach flavor.

I do understand, that Mallika falls under these broad spectrum of flavor profiles in its native environment(India). Unfortunately, due to the conditions in western hemisphere(soil, humidity and rain) it turned into a mediocre mango where(for those who've taste tested these two cultivars in both parts of the world) Amrapalli(small  to medium sized) a little bit better in SoFL conditions retaining 60-70% of its original flavors compared to the Indian version.
Thank you for taking the time to answer my question hopefully I didn't come across as being snarky. From what you said I think that Malika performs better in Central Florida. We receive about 12 in less annual rainfall than South Florida but we have higher humidity. The reason I mentioned soil because when I think of India I think of very rich fertile soil. I am blessed to have a silty loam with a clay component here in Osceola County that trees really seem to love. That may be why my Malika taste so excellent. We wait for the first stripe of yellow and a yellow ring around the stem then we pick put it in a cardboard box for 7 to 10 days. We call that Finney for finish in Creole. I have read  other Forum members who have multiple Groves say that a variety can taste different in each Groove that  maybe only 20 miles apart. Others have said that Malika can sometimes just have an off year but fortunately that has not happened to me. Checking my notes I see where I plan on grafting  some Ambika to Malika and  Amrapila to the Neelam . Just thinking and talking of mangoes brings me much joy thanks so much :)





You're welcome. You most definitely have better soil than us where you've silty loam with some clay component to it which makes it even better. Silty clay loam is very fertile.

Alluvial soil is the largest soil type in India. It  covers more than 45% of Indian plane. They're formed by the sediment deposition mostly  silt, by the three major rivers.

Over 60" of annual rain in  Broward county is one of the leading cause of leaching out all the micronutrients from our soil and on top of that when  it is a bit alkaline/acidic, there are loss of microorganisms as well.

Indian subcontinent has their monsoon during the month of June to Sept/Oct when over 90% of mangos  are harvested. On the contrary, South Florida has most rain falls in the month April to June when mangos are piling up sugars and flavors. Subsequently, sugars and flavors are washed out. That is why, lot of mango lovers will talk about their 2nd or 3rd crops little bit better when these varieties at least get over 15-20 days window to accumulate sugars and flavors after the heavy downpour.

I rarely heard about an off year for any cultivar in Indian subcontinent other than they're infested with MBBS, mango seed weevil, fruit cracking, major disaster with Anthracnose and scab all over the skin leading to fruit discoloration.
In contrast to anthracnose, the scab lesions do not expand after harvest, nor develop into a rot.
However, severely scarred fruit will show post-harvest anthracnose rot earlier than non-scarred fruit.
Anyways, Good to know that you love thinking and talking about mangos. Keep it up.
 


nileshkwr

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Re: Amrapali Mango
« Reply #14 on: January 03, 2021, 08:14:07 AM »
In India Amrapali is gaining popularity. It is more cultivated than Mallika. May be because of its dwarfness and all weather compatibility. Only downside is small fruit size and late season. Early mansoon can damage this late variety.

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Re: Amrapali Mango
« Reply #15 on: January 03, 2021, 02:55:22 PM »
I've been looking to grow one of these in my backyard in SoCal. Any idea where I can get one?

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Re: Amrapali Mango
« Reply #16 on: January 04, 2021, 12:39:54 PM »
I've been looking to grow one of these in my backyard in SoCal. Any idea where I can get one?
That is a pretty exotic variety. If you can't find anyone in California to purchase Budwood from to graft to a locally available mango tree ..

Call Tropical Acre Farms in West Palm Beach Florida
I read in another thread that they may start shipping to California if it's economically viable.

I would think that would be good news to Californians with over 300 varieties to choose from.

He may not have what you want readly available but I would think he may custom graft what you need.
Make that call the worst he can say is no : :(

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Re: Amrapali Mango
« Reply #17 on: January 18, 2021, 03:10:18 AM »
Its nice to read practical experiences from you all. In India only few pleople know these hybrid varieties exists. Keep sharing your knowledge.

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Re: Amrapali Mango
« Reply #18 on: January 30, 2021, 10:11:42 AM »
Any updates?

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Re: Amrapali Mango
« Reply #19 on: January 30, 2021, 11:13:58 PM »
Any updates?

A planted Amrapali which has never fruited or flowered for us since going in the ground in 2017 still shows no signs of flowering while the vast majority of other mango trees at the farm are either in bloom or have swelling buds. Pretty disappointing.

A topworked Amrapali that fruited last year, on the other hand, looks like itís going to bloom again.
« Last Edit: January 31, 2021, 08:48:53 AM by Squam256 »

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Re: Amrapali Mango
« Reply #20 on: January 31, 2021, 06:35:49 AM »
After many years I can say that Amrapali is an excellent cultivar, one of my favorites! In my dry climate it is very productive. Thr fruit is mid size, it has very low fibre, the flesh is orange with a complex, sweet taste. It tastes like the Alphonsos from India.

I have no idea how it performs in FL soil and climate, but here it is outstanding!

I would not compare it with Mallika. This one has not a strong resinous-carrot like flavour, but light and floral, whit reminds me of SE-Asia mangos...





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Re: Amrapali Mango
« Reply #21 on: April 14, 2023, 07:00:23 PM »
I'm contemplating making a custom graft order for amrapali on VP rootstock. I have one already but have had bad luck but it's still alive. The March before last we had high winds and where I had it planted was somewhat close to a dryer vent and normally that is not a problem but because of the wind coming from the East at 20 miles an hour and it was a extremely hot day with the addition of the dryer vent dehydrated that tree. It came back slowly and I decided last fall to transplant it. New location is much better but it isn't thriving as I would like. Even though I've had it one time three seasons ago I've kind of forgot if it was much different than Malika. After doing a web search and not coming up with much I hit on this thread which reaffirms that it does taste different than Malika. So to hedge my bet in case anything happens to the one I have I'm going to order another one and plant it in close proximity to my existing Amrapali. Anyone else growing this



« Last Edit: April 14, 2023, 08:31:38 PM by bovine421 »
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Re: Amrapali Mango
« Reply #22 on: April 15, 2023, 10:37:03 AM »
This must be one of the Indian varieties that needs cold weather to stimulate bloom.  I considered it when Alex told me it was a small tree, but it's probably a good thing I never ordered it.
John

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Re: Amrapali Mango
« Reply #23 on: April 15, 2023, 11:49:21 AM »
This must be one of the Indian varieties that needs cold weather to stimulate bloom.  I considered it when Alex told me it was a small tree, but it's probably a good thing I never ordered it.

Iím now convinced our planted one is a fake, foliage looks different from our real Amrapali . It was always suspect, and we never took budwood from it for this reason. Whatever it is, it Still has yet to fruit.

Our real Amrapali, which is a topwork, has fruited every year despite getting badly outgrown and overcrowded by its stump mate, and always tastes superb. I think itís definitely an Indian variety worth trialing here but hardly anyone has them.
« Last Edit: April 15, 2023, 11:51:12 AM by Squam256 »

johnb51

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Re: Amrapali Mango
« Reply #24 on: April 15, 2023, 01:24:24 PM »
Iím now convinced our planted one is a fake, foliage looks different from our real Amrapali . It was always suspect, and we never took budwood from it for this reason. Whatever it is, it Still has yet to fruit.

Our real Amrapali, which is a topwork, has fruited every year despite getting badly outgrown and overcrowded by its stump mate, and always tastes superb. I think itís definitely an Indian variety worth trialing here but hardly anyone has them.
Ok, that's good to know.  Thanks, Alex.  Could you remove a lot of the stump mate so you get more Amrapali to propagate?
« Last Edit: April 15, 2023, 01:27:20 PM by johnb51 »
John

 

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