Author Topic: Wanted: Pejibaye (Peach Palm) Bactris gasipaes cultivar from Peru  (Read 4725 times)

snhabegger

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This is a question for anyone who is familiar with the pejibaye research on Hawaii, Peruvian varieties, or anything to do with the development of the fruit.  This video (link below) shows a landrace that is clearly macrocarp, and completely thornless.  I've planted two accessions I received from the research facility on Hawaii, which are 100% heavily thorned, and haven't fruited yet; but they come from a landrace somewhere in Amazonian Peru/western Brazilian Amazon.  I was struck in this video by how much larger the pejibayes on these trees look than those I've seen elsewhere.  Two questions.

1)  How do these compare with the varieties being researched on Hawaii?

2)  Does anyone know where I can find seeds of this type, heavily macrocarp but also spineless?

Pijuayo Bactris gasipaes
« Last Edit: February 08, 2014, 09:53:48 PM by snhabegger »

nullzero

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Re: Wanted: Pejibaye cultivar from Peru
« Reply #1 on: February 04, 2014, 06:07:41 PM »
This is a question for anyone who is familiar with the pejibaye research on Hawaii, Peruvian varieties, or anything to do with the development of the fruit.  This video (link below) shows a landrace that is clearly macrocarp, and completely thornless.  I've planted two accessions I received from the research facility on Hawaii, which are 100% heavily thorned, and haven't fruited yet; but they come from a landrace somewhere in Amazonian Peru/western Brazilian Amazon.  I was struck in this video by how much larger the pejibayes on these trees look than those I've seen elsewhere.  Two questions.

1)  How do these compare with the varieties being researched on Hawaii?

2)  Does anyone know where I can find seeds of this type, heavily macrocarp but also spineless?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lnAsv4jF3E8

This seller on ebay had what looks like a good thornless variety. Here is the original listing: http://www.ebay.com/itm/Costa-Rica-Exotic-THORNLESS-GOOD-Peach-Palm-Pejibaye-10-seeds-Bactris-gasipaes-/130935061878?ssPageName=ADME%3AL%3AOU%3AUS%3A3160&nma=true&si=F9zrN4KDP5upLGX1UqMa77KWAII%253D&orig_cvip=true&rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.l2557
Grow mainly fruits, vegetables, and herbs.

HIfarm

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Re: Wanted: Pejibaye cultivar from Peru
« Reply #2 on: February 04, 2014, 11:05:28 PM »
I picked up a bunch (~350) of seedlings from a grower here who has very select thornless trees.  He does not have any thorned trees nor are there any nearby.  He mentioned his seed germinates 10-25% with thorned seedlings.  (He culled out a LOT of thorned seedlings when selecting mine & I still got quite a few that slipped through).  If there are thorned trees nearby, the percent will be much higher.  I would say that the USDA must have a mixed collection (best case).

I believe that initial work here was primarily to get thornless trees suitable for hearts of palm production.  However, this grower is now selecting for better flavor / higher oil content (evidently goes hand in hand) and also for thinner, more tender skin so skin removal is not required before eating.

John

This is a question for anyone who is familiar with the pejibaye research on Hawaii, Peruvian varieties, or anything to do with the development of the fruit.  This video (link below) shows a landrace that is clearly macrocarp, and completely thornless.  I've planted two accessions I received from the research facility on Hawaii, which are 100% heavily thorned, and haven't fruited yet; but they come from a landrace somewhere in Amazonian Peru/western Brazilian Amazon.  I was struck in this video by how much larger the pejibayes on these trees look than those I've seen elsewhere.  Two questions.

1)  How do these compare with the varieties being researched on Hawaii?

2)  Does anyone know where I can find seeds of this type, heavily macrocarp but also spineless?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lnAsv4jF3E8

snhabegger

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Re: Wanted: Pejibaye cultivar from Peru
« Reply #3 on: February 05, 2014, 12:46:41 AM »
I picked up a bunch (~350) of seedlings from a grower here who has very select thornless trees.  He does not have any thorned trees nor are there any nearby.  He mentioned his seed germinates 10-25% with thorned seedlings.  (He culled out a LOT of thorned seedlings when selecting mine & I still got quite a few that slipped through).  If there are thorned trees nearby, the percent will be much higher.  I would say that the USDA must have a mixed collection (best case).

I believe that initial work here was primarily to get thornless trees suitable for hearts of palm production.  However, this grower is now selecting for better flavor / higher oil content (evidently goes hand in hand) and also for thinner, more tender skin so skin removal is not required before eating.

John




Thanks, that is interesting to know.  Of the pejibayes that you grew on Hawaii, were their fruits as large as the ones in the video?  Spineless is nice, but what I would really like are seeds of a macrocarp variety.  I'm not so interested in heart-of-palm. 

fruitlovers

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Re: Wanted: Pejibaye cultivar from Peru
« Reply #4 on: February 05, 2014, 03:49:16 AM »
Never seen peach palm (what they're called here) that big. I notice also that all the spineless i've seen here fruit very poorly. The spineless here seem to mostly been bred for hearts of palm production, not for fruits.
I think most of the peach palms at experimental plot are thorny types. But yes they're mixed.
Here is an interesting video about peach palm production from Colombia. Yes it's in spanish, but a lot of it is visual. It claims that the best types in that area are red colored.

Chontaduro de Cuatro Esquinas
« Last Edit: February 06, 2014, 09:56:18 AM by murahilin »
Oscar

snhabegger

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Re: Wanted: Pejibaye (Peach Palm) Bactris gasipaes cultivar from Peru
« Reply #5 on: February 05, 2014, 09:37:58 PM »
Thank you for that very interesting video!  How does the size of the fruit there compare to the ARS research station on Hawaii?

fruitlovers

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Re: Wanted: Pejibaye (Peach Palm) Bactris gasipaes cultivar from Peru
« Reply #6 on: February 05, 2014, 09:44:53 PM »
Thank you for that very interesting video!  How does the size of the fruit there compare to the ARS research station on Hawaii?

All the ones i've seen here are a lot smaller.
Oscar

murahilin

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Re: Wanted: Pejibaye (Peach Palm) Bactris gasipaes cultivar from Peru
« Reply #7 on: February 06, 2014, 10:02:03 AM »
Regarding the USDA collection:

HBAC8 has an average weight of 79.82 gm and HBAC1 has an average weight of 69.46 gm.

HBAC8 should be considered a macrocarp while HBAC1 is at the border of mesocarp and macrocarp. I am not sure of the quality of the fruit though.

snhabegger

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Re: Wanted: Pejibaye (Peach Palm) Bactris gasipaes cultivar from Peru
« Reply #8 on: February 08, 2014, 09:53:17 PM »
It seems like (relative to other tropical fruits) very little effort has been put into making different cultivars of pejibaye available.  I would really like to get ahold of any of these macrocarp varieties (Peruvian, Colombian, doesn't matter) -- if anyone has any advice or contacts, I'd be very grateful. 

My reason is this, and I'd be glad of any feedback as to whether it makes sense or not; I think that this species has the potential to be fantastically useful as an adjunct to rice farming in Southeast Asia.  Maybe not so much in Thailand any more, where subsistence farming is nearly vanished -- but in Laos or Cambodia, a tree that produces a reliable load of high energy fruit is nothing to be sneezed at.  They could be planted on the margins of rice fields, or around the central fields of schools to be used as a supplement for kids to eat.  The food is high quality, contains protein and fat as well as carbs.  I'm growing two strains from Hawaii (Putumayo, I believe), and when they fruit I'm going to take some shoots and give them to the Ag department (along with some basic information) in the National University of Laos.  They are perfectly acceptable for a start (and I haven't seen the fruit yet, it might be macrocarp), but it would be great to be able to get some of these exceptional cultivars.

Plus there is a chance that they will go well with the different fish and shrimp pastes that the Thais like.

fruitlovers

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Re: Wanted: Pejibaye (Peach Palm) Bactris gasipaes cultivar from Peru
« Reply #9 on: February 09, 2014, 03:25:43 AM »
I think it's always good to introduce new crops, especially very nutritious and tasty ones, to new countries. Just be aware that getting people to accept new foods is not so easy, can take decades or longer, unless there is also a big push with marketing and information campaign.
Oscar

snhabegger

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Re: Wanted: Pejibaye (Peach Palm) Bactris gasipaes cultivar from Peru
« Reply #10 on: February 10, 2014, 01:38:03 AM »
The Thais are the stubbornest people I know when it comes to food -- they don't want to eat food from three provinces away, much less a new staple.  I think that the use of the pejibaye for heart-of-palm will help in its acceptance, this is very popular there.  As for Laos, it is a fairly regimented society (because of the government).  I can meet a few profs in the ag department, and if they're interested, they can figure out how to introduce it into some villages.

Time will tell . . .

HIfarm

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Re: Wanted: Pejibaye (Peach Palm) Bactris gasipaes cultivar from Peru
« Reply #11 on: February 10, 2014, 01:03:27 PM »
I have made the disturbing discovery that, evidently, mice like hearts of palm too.  I have had my peach palm seedlings on my lanai so that they will get part sun to grow them on and start to harden them off to plant them in the field.  They have been there for months with no problems.  About the time this string started, my wife noticed a mouse on the lanai when she went out for something at night.  The next day, we found stems just gone from a bunch of seedlings.  So, I am guessing mice.  I put out some rat/mouse poison & it looks like it may have stopped.  I haven't taken inventory yet but I think I lost a couple of dozen seedlings.

John

waiakea

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Re: Wanted: Pejibaye (Peach Palm) Bactris gasipaes cultivar from Peru
« Reply #12 on: April 07, 2014, 09:35:11 PM »
Where can I order some seedlings of peach palm from Peru?  Thank you in advance.

Best,