Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - FruitGrower

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10
1
This was actually a cutting but I donít know if the original seller grew it from seed. The leaves do look like GG but weíll see.

2
You probably got a hybrid or variation, but hard to say. Looks a lot like the flowers on the giant granadilla we grew a while back, don't think it was red either.

Thanks. I was kind of worried if may be that; after looking at the followers again, they do look different in other ways. If thatís the case, Iíll find out soon.

3
I have a Giant Granadilla that is flowering but the petals donít have that purple/ pinkish color that you see here: https://www.australianseed.com/shop/item/passionfruit-giant-granadilla
Any ideas why?





4



I may be the proponent of netting that skhan was referencing. I grow my citrus in containers under a protective netting. For sure itís not aesthetically pleasing, but if you can get over that, citrus is not that hard in S. Florida. The one thing I have noticed with the netting is that the trees are more prone to fungal issues as the netting gets wet and retains moisture and restricts airflow. Hereís a pic of my Excalibur red lime with some fruit.

I have a Tango and a Sugar Belle in the ground covered in netting which will remain for 2-3 years, when hopefully the trees will be large and healthy enough to sustain the inevitable HLB psyllid damage and produce some healthy fruit.

Good luck!

5



I may be the proponent of netting that skhan was referencing. I grow my citrus in containers under a protective netting. For sure itís not aesthetically pleasing, but if you can get over that, citrus is not that hard in S. Florida. The one thing I have noticed with the netting is that the trees are more prone to fungal issues as the netting gets wet and retains moisture and restricts airflow. Hereís a pic of my Excalibur red lime with some fruit.

6
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Orange sherbet mango first blooming
« on: February 01, 2023, 01:02:23 AM »
Interesting, Iíve heard they can be pretty precocious for some growers in south FloridaÖI wonder who has had good productivity luck with young OS trees (assuming not many growers have OS trees over 5 years old)

I have a 5 year old + OS thatís given me one mango so far. Hoping for a good year this year. 

8
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Fruit trees I gave up on
« on: January 10, 2023, 11:13:04 PM »
FruitGrower and Flgarden, what problems did you have with the trees, e.g., growth habit, disease, etc.? Thanks!

P.S. if my coffee plants go, I'll add that to the list of trees I gave up on . . .

The older one has constant limb dieback, symptoms of micronutrient deficiencies despite regular foliar and drench applications, and has hardly grown in 5+ yrs. The younger one grew a little better but the limbs always grew downward. I would trim those in an effort to get more upward growth and theyíd do the same, after so many prunings on a small tree, it began to show similar symptoms to the other one, though not as bad. I cut both back recently and went crazy with the minors in hopes of seeing something that will make me keep them but Iím not holding out hope. Weíll see.

9
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Fruit trees I gave up on
« on: January 09, 2023, 09:10:56 PM »
Since 2017 and 2020 respectively.

10
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Durian + Salak Seedlings - South Florida
« on: January 08, 2023, 06:30:31 PM »
Hi, Iím interested. Sending you a PM. Thanks.

11
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Most Difficult to Grow Trees
« on: January 08, 2023, 03:51:28 PM »
Citrus are one of the hardest types for me to grow. While I do not have to worry about HLB, I do have to make sure their potting mix is just right and constantly defend them from spider mites.

Sapindaceae are probably the most difficult for me. I've managed to keep one lychee alive long-term but with the exception of that lychee and the generally easy-to-grow Mamoncillo, I've killed many other plants in that genus. I've given up on growing rambutan or pulasan.

I wish I could grow citrus without the worry of HLB! 

Have you tried the 5-1-1 potting mix? I use a variation of that and have had great results.

12
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Most Difficult to Grow Trees
« on: January 08, 2023, 03:49:03 PM »
usually the tap root will coil itself in the pot, and cause the interior structure to malform to the point that they cannot transport water and nutrients efficiently-

Some species appear to be more resilient to this, maybe have a mechanism for stopping growth on the taproot? maybe just better at surviving off feeders?

Either way Artocarpus, Durio, and Canarium all seem to have this problem

Cerrado species IME also can have this problem as they have huge taproots to deal with the long droughts in their native region-

One of the major advantages to air layered plants for container growing is no taproot- also an old saying from bsbullie (i think is where I heard it) on here is that when shopping for trees at a nursery go for the smallest ones that haven't filled out the pot yet and put them in the ground immediately.

People typically go for the largest ones to get the most bang for their buck but root structure is very important to the long term health of some trees

That makes complete sense, I didnít realize you were growing in containers. I would imagine they would be hard to fruit in them, though I have seen fruiting jacks in 100+ gal. pots. 

I also adhere to the advice of getting a smaller plant for its pot size. Iíve had too many bad experiences with root-bound pots.

13
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Most Difficult to Grow Trees
« on: January 08, 2023, 12:45:47 AM »
Artocarpus always get too big too quick and choke themselves off

Curious what you mean by choking off? Mine got big before producing but theyíre going now with no problem.

14
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Most Difficult to Grow Trees
« on: January 08, 2023, 12:43:33 AM »
Most difficult to grow trees are
based on location...for example many struggle with cerrado species. Well if you live in the Brazilian cerrado, they grow wild.
Other example, mangosteen and durian. If you're in FL, they are gonna be hard to fruit and grow. If you're in Thailand, they're gonna be way easier.
For me, hardest are ultra tropicals so I don't mess with them. Other than that, nothings been too hard, just the cerrado species some are hard like plinia nana.

Yes, based on your location.

15
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Most Difficult to Grow Trees
« on: January 07, 2023, 11:39:24 PM »
I was inspired by Gnappiís post, Fruit Trees You've Given Up On, to start a thread about trees that have been difficult to grow, but youíve still not given up on and maybe even eventually found success with, expanding on what you found.  For me, itís been:

Purple Mangosteen - my hardest tree to grow so far. It is the most tropical of anything I grow, gets burned easily with too much sun but struggles to grow with too little, is finicky about the soil and nutrition, and seems to have a problem if you just look at it wrong.

Abui - my second hardest trees to grow.  With the exception of one particular tree from Excalibur that just excelled, all of the other roughly dozen trees have been difficult and I lost about half of them. They are very finicky in our limestone/ high ph soil, need a lot of minor nutrient applications, and donít seem to recover if damaged by the cold too young.

Citrus - lost about a dozen trees the first time around due to HLB (poor container mix didnít help either) but with screen protection theyíre actually not that difficult.

As I mentioned in the other thread, I would put lychee and my coconut crŤme mangos in the giving up on category.

16
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Fruit trees I gave up on
« on: January 07, 2023, 11:17:58 PM »
Great thread!

For me itís been:

Papaya - didnít like the fruit

Bananas - didnít like the fruit enough over store-bought to justify the effort.

On the fence is:

Coconut cream mango - two trees in different locations have been nothing but problems and no fruit production so far.

Lychees - my favorite fruit I grow but the issues with production and now the erinose mite have sealed the deal and I have already planted their replacements.

17
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / Re: WTB Marang Trees
« on: January 07, 2023, 10:59:15 PM »
I have a few available.

Thank you for the response, Fruitguy. Sending you a PM now. Thanks.

18
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / Re: WTB Marang Trees
« on: January 07, 2023, 01:16:39 PM »
Can try to grow from seeds are pretty easy

Thank you, will look for those now.

19
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / WTB Marang Trees
« on: January 07, 2023, 01:15:48 AM »
Looking for a couple of Marang trees. I found a seller from Hawaii but hoping to find something closer to S Florida. Does anyone have any sources for it and is anyone growing it? Thanks.

20
Thanks for all the replies!

Much gratitude for your post and offer FruitGrower. This helps me a lot. I will be contacting you in June for sure.

Gotta spot for a med to large tree, so even if it's hard to keep in check, won't be a problem.   

Got a tree coming tomorrow =)

Youíre very welcome, glad I could help you and help spread the word on this amazing fruit.

21
Hello everyone.

Is anyone growing Ma'afala (or any other breadfruit) in Miami-Dade or Homestead area? Any info on flowering and fruiting, harvest? Thinking of adding a tree and wanted to hear about other's experiences.

Also, how good is the fruit? I'm looking for something to cook with, and wondering how realistic it is to use breadfruit as a regular food source. Love potatoes, yucca, malanga, boniato, and all kinds of stuff like that, but not easy to grow them in my yard. Medium size tree would work.

Have eaten some in past while in the Caribbean, but has been a while.

I have Maíafala in Miami that flowers/ fruits well and I even picked fruit in December before the cold. It hardly flinched at the ~43 low a couple of weeks ago; it only had some minor leaf tip burn and did much better than my soursop, which completely defoliated. The fruit is very versatile and is one of only two savory tree fruits I grow, the other being avocado, so for us it definitely gets used. I am still learning to use it but I basically use it as a potato. And due to its spongy texture, the foods are more light and airy; they make the best tostones Iíve ever had. The only thing is itís not a medium tree by any stretch. Itís my most vigorous grower by far. If you want to try the fruit in season, send me a pm around June or so.

22
Citrus General Discussion / Re: At my wits end with these two citrus trees
« on: December 29, 2022, 11:24:52 PM »
In Florida it's best to dig a big hole and fill with potting soil or compost because the sand and shells here is junk other than a small amount in the mix.

We did an oak tree with a huge hole of potting soil like 20 years ago. It's huge now you would think it's 50 years old. Even my grapes don't want to grow in this sand. The pepper trees seem unstoppable though. They must take nutrients out of the air or something. Nothing in these shells and sand except calcium. Very low nitrogen and even if you fertilize it doesn't hold nutrients just washed into the waterways causing algae blooms. The plant will get a little. The compost will hold water and nutrients.

Thanks 1rainman. Glad you posted here.

I think citrus would prefer sand and shells rather than potting soil or compost but, as others have mentioned, I think your trees big problem is likely greening. I would not grow citrus without screen protection in most of Florida. Theyíre actually not that difficult to grow with the screens.

23
Ive got a decent mango tree collection now but would like to add a few more trees.

Just curious if planting mango trees too close to septic tank or drain field could burn the tree or ruin my septic system.

Im aware that mango trees have long taproots but Iím not educated on theirí root systems well enough to answer this one.

How close is too close?

Thanks

Abe

I have a Juliette about 8 ft. from my drain field but I did burry an 18Ē plastic root barrier in between and so far no problems, though the tree is still young.

24
Citrus General Discussion / Re: HLB Virus Map
« on: December 09, 2022, 11:13:41 PM »
I plugged in my address (St Petersburg, Fla) and it shows me in a green circle with the message: You are more than 5 miles from an HLB detection (colored boxes).

I guess the means that my citrus trees are relatively safe for now? I thought surely I would be in a hot zone.

Out of curiosity I plugged in my location and got the same message. I know for sure HLB is in my area as I have lost over a dozen trees to it, so I would be careful coming to the conclusion that your citrus is safe, just from that info.

Thanks for checking. I would like to see some other Floridians chime in with their results.

Incidentally, I received an email from a UF biologist letting me know the little wasps are being overnighted to me next Tuesday.

I tried the wasps, they were gone almost immediately and did nothing to stop the greening. The only method Iíve found effective is growing under a protective screen.

25
Citrus General Discussion / Re: HLB Virus Map
« on: December 09, 2022, 02:56:31 PM »
I plugged in my address (St Petersburg, Fla) and it shows me in a green circle with the message: You are more than 5 miles from an HLB detection (colored boxes).

I guess the means that my citrus trees are relatively safe for now? I thought surely I would be in a hot zone.

Out of curiosity I plugged in my location and got the same message. I know for sure HLB is in my area as I have lost over a dozen trees to it, so I would be careful coming to the conclusion that your citrus is safe, just from that info.

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10
SMF spam blocked by CleanTalk