Author Topic: Avocado graft pics  (Read 1664 times)

spaugh

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4507
    • San Diego County California
    • View Profile
Avocado graft pics
« on: January 19, 2022, 08:47:44 PM »
Hope this one works because I did about 100 of them like it.  Ive done them in the past but not enough to know if its highly successful.  Was the best I could come up with for the size of the rootstocks. 

Obviously the graft is not yet wrapped in the photo.  Just showing the cuts made. 

if you live somewhere cold you may need to wait longer to try this one.  The bark was slipping on most of my rootstocks but a few were not yet. 




« Last Edit: January 19, 2022, 08:50:14 PM by spaugh »
Brad Spaugh

spaugh

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4507
    • San Diego County California
    • View Profile
Re: Avocado graft pics
« Reply #1 on: January 19, 2022, 09:01:13 PM »
the peoples republic of california also granted me permission to burn an acre of brush.  So I did.  This will become a new block of trees.  Will have it planted out by summer. 




Brad Spaugh

kh0110

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1130
    • USA, Cerritos, CA 90703, Zone 10b
    • View Profile
Re: Avocado graft pics
« Reply #2 on: January 19, 2022, 09:45:22 PM »
Brad, that's about the only kind of graft I do now a day. Easy, quick, works.
Thera

spaugh

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4507
    • San Diego County California
    • View Profile
Re: Avocado graft pics
« Reply #3 on: January 19, 2022, 10:00:33 PM »
good to hear cause Im winging it.  Was banging them out in record time.  About 2-3 minutes per tree.  no graft tape on the union, just flagging tape. 
« Last Edit: January 19, 2022, 10:51:55 PM by spaugh »
Brad Spaugh

Lovetoplant

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 239
    • Oxnard,ca
    • View Profile
Re: Avocado graft pics
« Reply #4 on: January 20, 2022, 12:00:22 AM »
Brad, so you only peeled off the bark? There is no need to cut into the flesh? 

What I did was cut into the flesh at maybe 1/3 of the trunk thickness and slipped the scion in.  It only work 30% of the time. 

From now on I will follow your method.  Will this method work on citrus too?

Thanks

Lovetoplant

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 239
    • Oxnard,ca
    • View Profile
Re: Avocado graft pics
« Reply #5 on: January 20, 2022, 12:03:34 AM »
the peoples republic of california also granted me permission to burn an acre of brush.  So I did.  This will become a new block of trees.  Will have it planted out by summer. 





I love "the people's republic of California" and the walking zombie... ha ha

spaugh

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4507
    • San Diego County California
    • View Profile
Re: Avocado graft pics
« Reply #6 on: January 20, 2022, 12:08:58 AM »
the cambium layer is there right below the bark.  I think theres cambium tissue on the bark and the wood when you do this and it should give maximum cambium contact area. 

but I could have it all wrong and it may end up being a big fail.  Time will tell.  Someone with more knowledge could give us better insight on this.

I am not at all an expert on grafting.  Just good enough to get lucky sometimes with the avocados.  they are definitely not as easy as some other types of trees. 

if the scion and rootstocks are the same or close in diameter I do a cleft and match one side really well instead of this type of graft. 
« Last Edit: January 20, 2022, 12:10:46 AM by spaugh »
Brad Spaugh

Lovetoplant

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 239
    • Oxnard,ca
    • View Profile
Re: Avocado graft pics
« Reply #7 on: January 20, 2022, 12:22:05 AM »
the cambium layer is there right below the bark.  I think theres cambium tissue on the bark and the wood when you do this and it should give maximum cambium contact area. 

but I could have it all wrong and it may end up being a big fail.  Time will tell.  Someone with more knowledge could give us better insight on this.

I am not at all an expert on grafting.  Just good enough to get lucky sometimes with the avocados.  they are definitely not as easy as some other types of trees. 

if the scion and rootstocks are the same or close in diameter I do a cleft and match one side really well instead of this type of graft.

Sounds good.  Please give an update on this method.

jtnguyen333

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 211
    • San Diego
    • View Profile
Re: Avocado graft pics
« Reply #8 on: January 20, 2022, 02:12:46 PM »
Is this the area for all-sharwil orchard?
the peoples republic of california also granted me permission to burn an acre of brush.  So I did.  This will become a new block of trees.  Will have it planted out by summer. 





spaugh

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4507
    • San Diego County California
    • View Profile
Re: Avocado graft pics
« Reply #9 on: January 20, 2022, 03:10:04 PM »
i top worked 40 or so sharwils last week.  havent decided what to put in the new space.  maybe some cherimoyas and some avocados.
Brad Spaugh

canito 17

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 319
    • Puerto rico
    • View Profile
Re: Avocado graft pics
« Reply #10 on: January 20, 2022, 03:56:36 PM »
Here in PR sharwill is a poor producer. Semils are similar in size and heavy producers .But I dislike both, I still keep Oro Negro because a friend like it.
In Puerto Rico avocado size is very important. Small size avocado like pinkerton have no market

spaugh

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4507
    • San Diego County California
    • View Profile
Re: Avocado graft pics
« Reply #11 on: January 20, 2022, 10:49:20 PM »
I dont know, most people I know that tried Sharwil grown in CA thought it was one of the better ones they had tried.  It seems to produce well one year then nothing for another year or 2.  The irregular fruiting may end up sucking.  If it becomes a problem, I will switch them to reed.

I tried a kahaluu the other day.  Was ok but nothing special.  It was the first fruit the tree produced though so who knows.  Flavor wasnt that great to me.





« Last Edit: January 21, 2022, 01:35:02 AM by spaugh »
Brad Spaugh

Zafra

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 527
    • tropical, around 2700ft elevation
    • View Profile
    • Casa Abya Yala
Re: Avocado graft pics
« Reply #12 on: January 21, 2022, 05:28:23 PM »
Brad, that's about the only kind of graft I do now a day. Easy, quick, works.
Yep, me too. I use it for avocado, mango, sapodilla, mulberry, everything. I usually don't top the branch/rootstock until the graft pushes or if it seems to be healed but not pushing. This is the only graft I've had good results with.

spaugh

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4507
    • San Diego County California
    • View Profile
Re: Avocado graft pics
« Reply #13 on: January 21, 2022, 06:37:11 PM »
I probably should have left the tops on, but the window of opportunity to graft here is so narrow, if these fail I will have to wait a year anyway so it doesnt really matter.  They will bush back out if the grafts fail. 

Im pretty confident the grafts will work though so hopefully not too many redos.  The failed grafts from last year had multiple smaller brwnches bushing out and for those i did 2-3 cleft grafts which should almost guarantee success. 

Im sure most people dont do their plantings this way.  Plant a field of seedlings then top work.  Most farms use container grafted plants.  But for me it seems easier to do this way even if it takes multiple tries, doesnt really matter.  The rootstock continues to grow even if a top work attempt is unsuccessful, I can pick up again the following winter.  I tried to stress this point to some people.  You are not wasting time letting rootstocks grow in ground for many years.  It really makes little difference if you top work them in 1, 2, 3 years.  The roots continue growing and once you top work them, the above ground portion always comes right back after 1 summer of growth.  The size of the rootsystem determines how fast the scion grows. 
« Last Edit: January 21, 2022, 06:43:29 PM by spaugh »
Brad Spaugh

ScottR

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2006
    • USA,Arroyo Grande,Calif. 93420,zone 9b
    • View Profile
Re: Avocado graft pics
« Reply #14 on: January 21, 2022, 07:04:39 PM »
nice graft's Brad, good luck on planting out your new section! ;) 8)

spaugh

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4507
    • San Diego County California
    • View Profile
Re: Avocado graft pics
« Reply #15 on: January 21, 2022, 07:21:56 PM »
Thanks Scott.   :D. Have a great weekend.

 I will keep the progress updated in 6-8 weeks.
Brad Spaugh

Woodbert64

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 4
    • Kona, HI
    • View Profile
Re: Avocado graft pics
« Reply #16 on: January 29, 2022, 02:34:51 AM »
Sharwils are a reliable heavy producer here! Plus they taste delicious…

spaugh

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4507
    • San Diego County California
    • View Profile
Re: Avocado graft pics
« Reply #17 on: January 29, 2022, 07:06:42 PM »
Sharwils are a reliable heavy producer here! Plus they taste delicious…

It is a winner for certain. 
Brad Spaugh

mangoba

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 148
    • Mediterranean
    • View Profile
Re: Avocado graft pics
« Reply #18 on: March 09, 2022, 01:51:37 PM »
How are they Brad?

spaugh

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4507
    • San Diego County California
    • View Profile
Re: Avocado graft pics
« Reply #19 on: March 09, 2022, 04:28:51 PM »
Seems like all the graft unions have taken.  Didnt see a single black scion after 6-8 weeks now.  But a few of them have failed to grow properly or have broken in the wind etc.  But its looking pretty promising.  The sharwil is clearly easiest to graft.  Grafts grow fastest and strongest.  Followed by reed, then hass.  Ive seen the same pattern over several years with hass being particularly difficult to get started from grafts out in the field exposed to the heat and wind.  The sharwil tolerates the dry air much better when the grafts are new.  This would be a non issue in a protected greenhouse in pots.  I just dont want to manage 100s of pots in a greenhouse for over 1 year.  Because that bring about other issues like salt burn, aphids, grasshoppers, etc that are otherwise not a problem out in the elements.  The greenhouse plants have a nice cozy environment but that leads to bugs and rot problems for me.  Much more care free to have them planted in the hill.  But the tradeoff is grafting becomes really critical for that 2-3 month period of getting the graft going. 
Brad Spaugh

Longranger

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 119
    • USA, Bonsall Ca
    • View Profile
Re: Avocado graft pics
« Reply #20 on: March 09, 2022, 04:54:14 PM »
That is very encouraging Brad. Our weather has been unusually variable week to week for the past 2 months including a couple of Santa Ana events. If they are good now future grafts should be a pretty sure thing.

Lovetoplant

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 239
    • Oxnard,ca
    • View Profile
Re: Avocado graft pics
« Reply #21 on: March 09, 2022, 07:12:27 PM »
Brad, you were correct on grafting them in January.  The grafts took a lot faster than spring graft.  I have mine pushed in just 3 weeks.

spaugh

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4507
    • San Diego County California
    • View Profile
Re: Avocado graft pics
« Reply #22 on: March 09, 2022, 07:35:08 PM »
Brad, you were correct on grafting them in January.  The grafts took a lot faster than spring graft.  I have mine pushed in just 3 weeks.

They pushed so quickly because the scions were taken right before they were about to push. 
Brad Spaugh

spaugh

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4507
    • San Diego County California
    • View Profile
Re: Avocado graft pics
« Reply #23 on: March 09, 2022, 08:00:15 PM »
That is very encouraging Brad. Our weather has been unusually variable week to week for the past 2 months including a couple of Santa Ana events. If they are good now future grafts should be a pretty sure thing.

I think the grafts would have failed if I had not gone out and bagged them.  Theres nasty dry wind here every other day it seems like.  The bags have a plastic liner and hold moisture well and block light which is needed the first month or so after buds break the tape here or the scions dry up and fail. 

I did a quick walk around today and it looks good.  Looks like 95% or more success rate.   Unless things go really sideways these should be fine.  Next Ill run about 5lbs (for 200 trees) of 20-20-20 salt fertilizer through the irrigation lines to give them a boost.  I like to use the chemical fertilizer the first year or 2 to really get them growing good then switch to organic.














« Last Edit: March 09, 2022, 08:12:22 PM by spaugh »
Brad Spaugh

spaugh

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4507
    • San Diego County California
    • View Profile
Re: Avocado graft pics
« Reply #24 on: March 09, 2022, 08:45:26 PM »
Some of next years trees sitting on the counter in water.  These will go in 1gal pots until they sprout up a bit and then into the ground by june and top worked january 2023.  The trees never need shading other than the graft, or staking. They are tough from the full wind and sun exposure right from the start.


« Last Edit: March 09, 2022, 08:47:44 PM by spaugh »
Brad Spaugh

 

SMF spam blocked by CleanTalk